Microsoft Publisher 97 for Dummies

Overview

You don't have to master sophisticated, professional desktop publishing programs like PageMaker or QuarkXPress to get sophisticated, professional results. With Microsoft's Publisher 97 software and hands-on, practical guidance from Microsoft Publisher 97 For Dummies you can get started right away creating your own newsletters, brochures, calendars, resumes, stationery, and other documents. In Microsoft Publisher 97 For Dummies, desktop publishing experts Barrie Sosinsky, Christopher J. Benz, and Jim McCarter ...
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Overview

You don't have to master sophisticated, professional desktop publishing programs like PageMaker or QuarkXPress to get sophisticated, professional results. With Microsoft's Publisher 97 software and hands-on, practical guidance from Microsoft Publisher 97 For Dummies you can get started right away creating your own newsletters, brochures, calendars, resumes, stationery, and other documents. In Microsoft Publisher 97 For Dummies, desktop publishing experts Barrie Sosinsky, Christopher J. Benz, and Jim McCarter share their own secrets for designing attractive layouts, adding clip art without cheesing up your document, and, most importantly, preparing your document so that your service bureau or printer can output it without hassles or extra costs.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764501487
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/28/1997
  • Series: For Dummies Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 354
  • Product dimensions: 7.41 (w) x 9.26 (h) x 1.03 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction

About This Book
How to Use This Book
You've Been Warned
Our Foolish Assumptions
How This Book Is Organized
Part I: Hey! Ya Say Ya Want a Revolution?
Part II: Some Glue, Some Scissors, a Board, et Voilà
Part III: 10,000 Words, One Maniac
Part IV: Picture That
Part V: Just So Output
Part VI: Publishing on the Internet
Part VII: The Part of Tens
Icons Used in This Book
Where to Go from Here

Part I: Hey! Ya Say Ya Want a Revolution?


Chapter 1: Own the Printing Press
When Should I Use Microsoft Publisher 97?
How Desktop Publishing Works
The Design Process
Storyboarding
Assembling a page
Outputting a page
You Want Fast? Well, Meet Mr. Wizard
Our favorite, the Airplane PageWizard
Facts about PageWizards
Okay, now meet Mr. Wizard's family

Chapter 2: Designer Genes
Know Your Audience
Where Others Have Gone Before
The Keys to Design Success
Desktop Style Resources
Everything Costs Money

Chapter 3: Basic Housekeeping
Launch Time
What's All This on My Screen?
Options and More Options . . .
Help on Help
Finding a topic
Inch-by-inch; step-by-step
Things You Can Do with Files
Playing with files on the outside
Starting a publication
Opening remarks
Finding files
Saving your files means never having to say you're sorry
File saving formats
File-saving mechanics
Insurance, please
Canning templates
Nag me
Close calls
Shut Down without Crash Landing

Part II: Some Glue, Some Scissors, a Board, et Voilà


Chapter 4: Working with Pages
In the Beginning: The Page
Moving from page to page
Scrolling within a page
Changing What You See On-Screen
Two-page spreads
Full Page and Actual Size views
Zooming around
Lining Things Up
Margin and grid guides
Ruler guides
Snap to it!
Using Virtual Rulers
Creating Background Pages
From the background to the foreground and back again
Working with multiple backgrounds
Adding background objects
Creating headers and footers
Inserting page numbers
Getting a date
Suppressing background objects
Adding and Deleting Pages
Adding pages
Deleting pages
Modifying the Page Layout
The Normal layout
The Special Fold layout
The Special Size layout
The Labels layout
Getting Your Pages Set to Print

Chapter 5: Objects and Frames
Working with Frames
Creating frames
Selecting things
Editing frames
Filling frames
Moving and resizing frames
Working with Drawn Objects
Understanding object properties
Using the Format Painter
Aligning and positioning objects
Working with layers
Wrapping Text around Objects
Creating regular text wraps
Fine-tuning your text wraps
Grouping Objects

Part III: 10,000 Words, One Maniac


Chapter 6: Getting the Word
More about Text Frames
Typing text
Importing text
Using the Clipboard
Using the Text File command
Exporting text
Let Me Tell You a Story
Forming, reforming, and deforming stories
Connecting frames
Moving among the story's frames
Autoflowing text
Rearranging chains
Deleting stories
Editing story text
Adding continuation notices
Table Frames
Moving around in tables
Creating a table frame
Modifying tables
Resizing tables, columns, and rows
Inserting and deleting columns and rows
Merging and splitting cells
Working with table text
Importing table frame text
Moving and copying table text
Formatting table text manually

Chapter 7: Editors Are Bought, Not Born
Tricks of the Editing Meisters
Movin' and groovin'
Selection tricks
Drag and drop
Symbols
Tools of the Editing Meisters
Hide and seek: Find and Replace
Can you check my spelling?
Hyphenation
Text Formatting
The Format toolbar
Character formatting
Paragraph formatting
Frame formatting

Chapter 8: Vintage Type: The Corkscrew, Please
About Type and Fonts
Font styles
A primer on buying fonts
How to Work with Fonts
Tracking down TrueType fonts
Viewing character sets
Installing PostScript fonts
Installing and removing TrueType fonts
Selecting fonts in your publication
Printing with fonts
Typography 101
WordArt
Other Special Text Effects

Part IV: Picture That


Chapter 9: You Ought to Be in Pictures
Understanding More about Picture Frames
Getting Yours
Using the Microsoft ClipArt Gallery
Inserting picture files
Modifying pictures
Working with Different Picture Types
Painted versus drawn graphics
Paint with Microsoft Paint
Draw with Microsoft Draw
Say OLE!
Using the Design Gallery
Tracking Down Other Picture Sources
Scanning the Picture
Reviewing File Formats

Chapter 10: Color by the Numbers
How Color Improves Your Page
What Is Color?
Color Models
Printing in Color
Process color (full-color) printing
Spot color printing
Color Matching
Matching process color
Matching spot color
Color Resources

Part V: Just So Output


Chapter 11: Final Checks
The Eyes Have It
The Design Checker
Word Fitting Techniques
Copyfitting
Adjusting spacing
Improving the Page
Adding special page elements
Adding drawn objects
Borders and shading
Special symbols

Chapter 12: Printing, Print Shops, and Paper
Printers and Output Quality
Selecting the Target Printer
Printing your pages
Planning for outside printing
Using Outside Printing Services
Working with an outside service
Avoiding problems
Setting Up for Outside Printing
Outside printer setup
Outside printer printing
Selecting Paper
Paper as a design element
Special papers from PaperDirect
More Printing Resources

Part VI: Publishing on the Internet


Chapter 13: Weaving a Web Page
What are Web pages?
Using the Web site PageWizard
Adding text or picture objects
Adding text
Adding pictures
Adding and removing hyperlinks
Adding hyperlinks
Removing hyperlinks
Adding color and texture to the background
Adding color to the background
Adding texture to the background

Chapter 14: Getting Published (On the Internet)
Previewing a Web Site
Publishing Your Web Site
Publishing to a folder on your PC
Publishing to a local network drive
Publishing on the Internet

Part VII: The Part of Tens


Chapter 15: Ten Great Design Ideas
Borrow the best ideas of others
Design your piece with your audience in mind
Use a design grid
Use pictures well
Check out the Design Gallery
Put repeating design elements onto your background
Keep It Simple, Stupid
Create templates and use the PageWizards
Use multicolumn text frames
Live with your designs a while

Chapter 16: Ten Design Blunders
Not designing your publication for the right audience
Not talking to your printer early in the project
Using the wrong printer driver
Making your publication too complicated
Making your pages too boring!
Printing too many or too few copies
Designing a publication that is too expensive
Don't violate copyright laws
Scanning your files at the wrong resolution

Chapter 17: Ten Text Tips
Use the keyboard shortcuts
Zoom in and out of your text block
Show those special characters
Check your spelling and then proofread
Use the Format Painter
Use autoflow
Hyphenate justified text
Use the text frame's context-sensitive menu
Use typographers symbols and conventions
Use your word processor to edit your stories

Chapter 18: Ten Type Tips
Use fonts sparingly
Use appropriate fonts
Create a style sheet
Collect fonts in families
Use the WordArt program to create fancy headlines
Yearn to kern your headlines
Use table frames to present tabular data
Use bulleted and numbered Lists
Wrap text around your graphics
Use ruler settings to make your tabs

Chapter 19: Ten Ways to Use Color
Use color sparingly
Highlight important information
Create a color scheme and stick to it
Consider using process color
Use complementary colors
Use culturally appropriate colors
Use a colored page as a design element
Use a color for your text
Use spot colors appropriately
Use the Microsoft Publisher 97 color-matching system

Chapter 20: Ten Things to Check Before Printing
Give page proofs to your outside printer
Show your page proofs around
Include all your files and fonts on your submission disk
Give your service bureau all original materials
Give the Microsoft Publisher 97 Infosheet to your outside printer
Use the Microsoft Publisher 97 checklist
Run the Design Checker
Specify the correct printer driver
Use printing marks on your master copies
Check for the end of the story

Chapter 21: Ten Questions for Your Service Bureau
Are you comfortable working with Windows files?
How do you want to receive my files?
What is your usual turnaround time?
What kind of imagesetter do you use?
What kind of equipment do you have in your shop?
Do you have the creator applications for the EPS graphics that I create?
How much do you charge?
Can you outsource the work that you can't do?
Can you give me some references?

Chapter 22: Ten Ways to Save Money Printing
Talk to your printer
Choose an appropriate printer
Solicit three written bids for a print job
Make a careful paper selection
Provide master print copy to your printer
Ask for a cash discount
Don't print close to your deadline
Use special paper to print in color without having to print in color
Use a print broker for large and/or expensive print jobs
Minimize the amount of setup work that your printer must do

Chapter 23: Ten Resources You Should Know About
Desktop Publishing & Design For Dummies, by Roger Parker, IDG Books Worldwide, Inc.
The PC Is Not a typewriter, by Robin Williams, Peachpit Press
Pocket Pal, 14th Edition, International Paper
The Illustrated Handbook of Desktop Publishing & Typesetting, 2nd Edition, by Michael Klepper, Windcrest Books
Technique Magazine, Boston, MA
Windows 95 For Dummies, by Andy Rathbone, IDG Books Worldwide, Inc.
The Macintosh Font Book, 3rd Edition, by Efert Fenton, Peachpit Press
Getting It Printed, by Mark Beach, Steve Shepro, and Ken Russon, Coast to Coast Press
Real World Scanning and Halftones, by David Bladner and Steve Roth, Peachpit Press
Font and Function, Adobe Systems

Index

IDG Books Worldwide Registration Card

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First Chapter

Chapter 2
Designer Genes

In This Chapter

  • Knowing your audience
  • Analyzing other people's projects
  • Discovering the keys to design success
  • Working within a budget

We live in a fast age. Before, you had time to read the occasional ad or brochure that appeared in your mailbox; now, you may receive ten or twenty mailings. We are bombarded with so much stuff that we tend to ignore almost everything.

So, here's the deal. Your publication has five seconds to get someone's attention. (Some design gurus claim that most pieces get about two seconds of review before being tossed.) If your published piece doesn't have something that interests your audience and makes them want to explore it further, poof! it's gone.

If you have only five seconds, you better make sure that your primary message is the first thing a reader sees. You have little room for error on this score. Consider any design device that you can use to repeat -- and build on -- the primary message.

This chapter shows you the design basics necessary to do your work in Microsoft Publisher 97 quickly and well.

Know Your Audience

The first step to creating a successful project is figuring out who your audience is and how they will interact with your work. Knowing your audience helps you refine your publication's look and feel. In addition, it helps you determine your writing style, which is essential for good communication.

You can learn a lot about successful design by studying the work of marketing gurus, particularly those who do advertising. Advertising combines a creative art form with statistically measured results based on large populations of target markets. One of our favorite books on this topic is Successful Direct Response Marketing by Robert Stone (published by Crain Books).

While you're designing your publication, show it to others so that you can figure out who your audience is and what they need.

When you know your audience, you can create a publication that has the correct "voice" or "tone" for that group. For example, a typeface that looks like lettering on a ransom note is inappropriate for business correspondence but might be perfect for birthday party invitations. Microsoft Publisher 97 classifies document styles according to the expected audience; the gray flannel style, for example, should appeal to a business audience.

Knowing your audience can help you decide which typeface to use on a page. Some vendors sell type in packages designed for specific uses. Their catalogs (which are works of art in themselves) describe the best use for many typefaces and also suggest typefaces that work well together.

The typeface that you use can flavor your publication for a particular audience.

Where Others Have Gone Before

When we first start the design phase of a publishing project, we try to collect the best examples of work in that area. We look at the overall design of a piece and look for style elements that we can use as a springboard to creating our own style. Keep file folders of ads that you like, marketing pieces that you get in the mail, and other publications. Then, when you're ready to create a piece, you can sit down and peruse your samples. Invariably, you'll find an idea or two to get you started.

Make sure that you do not copy too much from anyone's design when making your own work.

Any artwork, images, templates, or designs that you find in Microsoft Publisher 97 and its Design Gallery are there for your use. The Readme file states: "You are free to use Publisher clip art for any publication you print. You may not, however, sell or distribute Publisher clip art electronically as software, such as in a clip art library." Restrictions such as these are common for clip art. You should always check the license of any artwork that you use before incorporating it into commercial products.

When you use other people's work, you can adapt the designs that you collect, borrowing an idea here and an idea there. You cannot and should not copy an entire design or image from someone else, however. That's illegal. Most designs are copyrighted by the authors.

Sometimes a fine line exists between adapting an idea and copying one. You need to use good judgment. Note that the law in this area is volatile and subject to change. We recommend The Desktop Publisher's Legal Handbook by David Sitarz (published by Nova Press) as a good place to start learning about these issues.

Another resource to use when beginning the design phase is a study of before and after makeovers. You can find case studies in the design makeover columns in desktop publishing magazines and in some specialized books on desktop publishing. The following resources take this approach:

  • Desktop Publishing & Design For Dummies®, by Roger C. Parker (published by IDG Books Worldwide, Inc.).
  • BEFORE & After: How to design cool stuff, 1830 Sierra Gardens Drive, Roseville, CA 95661; Phone: 916-784-3880 and Fax: 916-784-3995.

The Keys to Design Success

Most design gurus agree that you can apply certain principles to your designs to make them easier to understand and more attractive to the reader. The exact terminology for these principles may vary, but the set of principles is nearly always the same.

A list of these principles follows. When you begin to design a publication, you may not always analyze your work in terms of these principles, but you should at least keep them in mind:

  • Be consistent. Elements on a page should be repeated in appropriate places. Consistency is particularly important in longer publications such as books. The more structured you make your design, the easier producing the piece will be.
  • The best way to enforce consistent design is to create a meaningful style sheet for your publication. Microsoft Publisher 97 can help you apply styles or formats to text, objects, tables, and other page elements. Just as word processor documents can have style sheets, Microsoft Publisher 97 can import or create text styles. You can put together your Microsoft Publisher 97 project more quickly and more consistently if you use a well-developed style sheet and template rather than simply develop on-the-fly.

  • Put things where people tend to see them. People have a tendency to view a page in a diagonal from the top left to the bottom right. Elements in the center of the page get the most attention; elements at the bottom left and top right get the least attention.
  • Your design should treat a two-page spread as if it were a single page because the entire two-page spread is the unit of design that readers see.

  • Keep your message simple. To make your reader focus on the content, consider the following:
    • Use white space. Many well-designed pieces have a white space content of 50 percent.
    • Limit yourself to no more than two fonts on a page.
    • Be judicious with color -- apply it as highlighting.
  • Keep related or similar information on a page. Keep related information close together or aligned.
  • You can create a block of related elements by separating them from other elements on the page with rules (lines), frames (boxes), or white space. Likewise, if a graphic relates to a story, the graphic should appear close to the story. Any caption for the graphic should appear close to the graphic.

  • Align everything on a page with something. Create a grid and place your page elements on that grid, as described in Chapter 4. Creating a page grid for a layout is akin to creating an outline for a written document.
  • The same page grid can produce order on pages without producing pages that look alike. For example, three- and four-column newspapers and newsletters are so common because you can produce many looks within those formats. You can have blocks in the grid that are not filled in, for example, and graphics that span multiple blocks. Figure 2-1 is a four-column grid with three rows. This layout generates 12 blocks and offers a lot of flexibility. Figures 2-2 through 2-4 show you three examples that use this grid layout.

  • Provide contrast to enliven your work. Balance consistency by doing the unexpected.
  • Use a page hierarchy. If you have a large headline, the reader will probably start reading the page there. You can use smaller headlines to divide a page into sections. You can also use vertical and horizontal rules to break your page into blocks and provide contrast. Emphasize what's important by making it look different, but don't emphasize parts of your page that have less importance.

The columns in your page grid don't have to be the same width, and the pages in a two-page spread don't have to be balanced or symmetrical. We think that balanced pages are boring. We tend to vary the size and placement of graphics across columns. We also favor the use of sidebars, pull-quotes (short statements that summarize information on a page), large initial capitals, and column shadings to break up the page.

Desktop Style Resources

Desktop publishing has turned millions of people into typographers and typesetters. Using type and doing typography is not a skill that comes naturally to most people, however. The many rules and guidelines specific to page layout don't pertain to typewritten text or text prepared in word processors. The following resources can help you make the transition from text documents to desktop publications.

Two of the most accepted style guides for clear writing in the United States for the English language are the following:

  • The Elements of Style, 3rd Edition, by William Strunk, Jr. and E. B. White (published by Macmillan)
  • The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th Edition (published by the University of Chicago Press)

A number of texts specialize in the handling of type. In addition to The Chicago Manual of Style, the following books are worthy additions to your library:

  • Words into Type (published by Prentice Hall)
  • Hart's Rules for Compositors and Readers (published by University Press)
  • Pocket Pal (published by International Paper Company)

The following two small texts are noteworthy for beginning users because they deal with typographical issues in a friendly way:

  • The PC Is Not a Typewriter, by Robin Williams (published by Peachpit Press)
  • The Desktop Style Guide, by James Felici (published by Bantam Computer Books)

Desktop publishing has its own language. Each typography reference work mentioned in this section helps you keep your picas separate from your points, your en dashes from your em dashes, and your verso from your recto.

Everything Costs Money

Your budget can play a prominent role in the design of your publication. You don't want to merrily design something only to be shocked by the sticker price when you arrive at the printer. A good designer always asks the question, "How much were you intending to spend?" straight out because it helps to ground the project in reality. Perhaps good designers ask the question also because it helps them set their pay scale.

Just because a project has a limited budget doesn't mean that the publication has to be poorly designed. It simply means that you must rely on techniques that not only enhance your work but also are within your budget. We have seen creative, effective, and attractive pieces produced on a limited budget, and we have seen expensively designed pieces that belong in the Desktop Publishing Hall of Shame. It takes experience and good judgment to get the most out of what you have to spend.

Establish a good working relationship with the staff at your print shop. They can help you in the early design phase by suggesting paper and color selections. Inquire about their price breaks for quantity printing. They can also supply you with the correct printer driver to install so that your design both formats correctly on your screen and prints correctly to their printer.

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