Microsoft Word 2002

Microsoft Word 2002

by Joseph W. Habraken
     
 

Because most people don't have the luxury of sitting down uninterrupted for hours at a time to learn Word, this 10-Minute Guide focuses on the most often used features, covering them in lessons designed to take 10 minutes or less to complete. In addition, this guide teaches the user how to use Word without relying on technical jargon. By providing

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Overview

Because most people don't have the luxury of sitting down uninterrupted for hours at a time to learn Word, this 10-Minute Guide focuses on the most often used features, covering them in lessons designed to take 10 minutes or less to complete. In addition, this guide teaches the user how to use Word without relying on technical jargon. By providing straightforward, easy-to-follow explanations and lists of numbered steps that tell the user which keys to press and which options to select.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780789726360
Publisher:
Que
Publication date:
08/28/2001
Series:
10 Minute Guide Series
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.60(d)

Read an Excerpt

Lesson 3: Working with Documents

In this lesson, you learn how to start a new document and enter text. You also learn how to take advantage of Word document templates and Word document wizards.

Starting a New Document

When you choose to start a new document in Word, you can take three routes. You can
  • Create a blank new document using Word's default template.
  • Create a document using one of Word's many other templates or a custom one you created yourself.
  • Create a document using one of the Word wizards, such as the Fax or Envelope Wizard.
The amount of software assistance you get in creating your new document is greatly increased when you choose the template or wizard option.

Plain English
Template A blueprint for a document that may already contain certain formatting options and text.

When you create a new document from scratch, you are actually using a template—the Blank Document template. Documents based on the Blank Document template do not contain any premade text (as some of the other templates do), and the formatting contained in the document reflects Word's default settings for margins, fonts, and other document attributes (including any you customized specifically to your needs or preferences). To find more information on default Word settings involving font and document attributes, see Lesson 7, "Changing How Text Looks," and Lesson 11, "Working with Margins, Pages, and Line Spacing," respectively).

As covered in Lesson 2, "Working in Word," Word automatically opens a new blank document for you when you start the Word soft-ware. You can also open a new document when you are already in the Word application window.

To open a new document, follow these steps:

  1. Select File, and then New. The task pane opens on the right side of your screen. Under New from Template, select General Templates and Word opens the Templates dialog box with a range of templates from which to choose (see Figure 3.1).

  2. Make sure that the General tab is selected in the Templates dialog box, and then double-click the Word Blank Document icon. A new document appears in the Word application window.
Although the steps shown here are designed for you to create a new blank document, you could have chosen any of the templates available in the Templates dialog box to create a new document. The fastest way to create a new blank document is to click the New Blank Document icon on the Word Standard toolbar.


Caution
What Happened to My Previous Document? If you were already working on a document, the new document will, in effect, open on top of the document you were previously working on. You can get back to the previous document by clicking the appropriately named document icon on the Windows taskbar (if you haven't yet named the first document, it might appear as Document1 on the taskbar). You can also select the Windows menu to see a list of currently opened documents. Click any document in the list to switch to it.

...Figure 3.1
When you choose New on the File menu, the task pane opens and you can choose General Templates.


Tip
Removing Multiple Document Icons from the Taskbar If you prefer not to see the open document icons on the taskbar, select the Tools menu, select Options, and click the View tab. Clear the Windows in Taskbar check box. You must then use the Windows menu to switch between documents.

Entering Text

After you have opened a new document, you are ready to start entering text. Notice that a blinking vertical element called the insertion point appears in the upper-left corner of your new document. This is where new text will be entered.

Begin typing text from the keyboard. The insertion point moves to the right as you type. As soon as you reach the end of the line, the text automatically wraps to the next line if you are using word wrap.

When you reach the end of a paragraph in Word, you must press the Enter key to manually insert a line break. If you want to view the manually placed line breaks (called paragraph marks) in your document, click the Show/Hide button on the Word Standard toolbar.

If the Show/Hide button is not visible on the Word toolbar, click the Tool Options button located at the end of the Standard toolbar. From the shortcut menu that appears, select Add or Remove Buttons and then Standard. A drop-down box of other buttons, including the Show/Hide button, appears. Clicking this button adds it to the Standard toolbar. When you are finished, click outside the drop-down box to return to your document. Now you can turn the Show/Hide option on and off as previously described....

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Meet the Author

Joe Habraken is an information technology professional with a master's degree from American University and more than 15 years experience as an author, consultant and instructor. Joe is a Microsoft® Certified Professional and Cisco Certified Network Associate. Joe currently serves as a technical director for ReviewNet Corporation and also is an instructor at the University of New England in Portland, Maine, where he teaches IT Certification courses. Joe is a bestselling author whose publications include The Complete Idiot's Guide to Microsoft® Access 2000, The Complete Idiot's Guide to Microsoft® Windows 2000, Microsoft® Office 10 8-In-1, and Practical Cisco Routers.

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