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Microsoft XNA Game Studio 4.0: Learn Programming Now!: How to program for Windows Phone 7, Xbox 360, Zune devices, and more
     

Microsoft XNA Game Studio 4.0: Learn Programming Now!: How to program for Windows Phone 7, Xbox 360, Zune devices, and more

4.7 4
by Rob Miles
 

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ISBN-10: 0735651574

ISBN-13: 2900735651578

Pub. Date: 03/01/2011

Publisher: Microsoft Press

Now you can build your own games for your Xbox 360, Windows Phone 7, or Windows-based PC—as you learn the underlying concepts for computer programming. Use this hands-on guide to dive straight into your first project—adding new tools and tricks to your arsenal as you go. No experience required!

  • Learn XNA and C# fundamentals—and

Overview

Now you can build your own games for your Xbox 360, Windows Phone 7, or Windows-based PC—as you learn the underlying concepts for computer programming. Use this hands-on guide to dive straight into your first project—adding new tools and tricks to your arsenal as you go. No experience required!

  • Learn XNA and C# fundamentals—and increase the challenge with each chapter
  • Write code to create and control game behavior
  • Build your game’s display—from graphics and text to lighting and 3-D effects
  • Capture and cue sounds
  • Process input from keyboards and gamepads
  • Create features for one or multiple players
  • Tweak existing games—and invent totally new ones

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900735651578
Publisher:
Microsoft Press
Publication date:
03/01/2011
Edition description:
NE
Pages:
466

Table of Contents

;
Acknowledgments;
Introduction;
Who This Book Is For;
System Requirements;
Code Samples;
Errata and Book Support;
We Want to Hear from You;
Stay in Touch;
Getting Started;
Chapter 1: Computers, C#, XNA, and You;
1.1 Introduction;
1.2 How the Book Works;
1.3 C# and XNA;
1.4 Getting Started;
1.5 Writing Your First Program;
1.6 Conclusion;
1.7 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 2: Programs, Data, and Pretty Colors;
2.1 Introduction;
2.2 Making a Game Program;
2.3 Working with Colors;
2.4 Controlling Color;
2.5 Conclusion;
2.6 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 3: Getting Player Input;
3.1 Introduction;
3.2 Reading a Gamepad;
3.3 Using the Keyboard;
3.4 Adding Vibration;
3.5 Program Bugs;
3.6 Conclusion;
3.7 Chapter Review Questions;
Images, Sound, and Text;
Chapter 4: Displaying Images;
4.1 Introduction;
4.2 Resources and Content;
4.3 Using Resources in a Game;
4.4 Conclusion;
4.5 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 5: Writing Text;
5.1 Introduction;
5.2 Text and Computers;
5.3 Getting the Date and Time;
5.4 Making a Prettier Clock with 3-D Text;
5.5 Creating Fake 3-D;
5.6 Conclusion;
5.7 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 6: Creating a Multi-Player Game;
6.1 Introduction;
6.2 Conclusion;
6.3 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 7: Playing Sounds;
7.1 Adding Sound;
7.2 Conclusion;
7.3 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 8: Creating a Timer;
8.1 Making Another Game;
8.2 Finding Winners Using Arrays;
8.3 Conclusion;
8.4 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 9: Reading Text Input;
9.1 Using the Keyboard in XNA;
9.2 Working with Arrays, Objects, and References;
9.3 Displaying Keys;
9.4 Conclusion;
9.5 Chapter Review Questions;
Writing Proper Games;
Chapter 10: Using C# Methods to Solve Problems;
10.1 Introduction;
10.2 Playing with Images;
10.3 Creating a Zoom-Out;
10.4 Conclusion;
10.5 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 11: A Game as a C# Program;
11.1 Introduction;
11.2 Creating Game Graphics;
11.3 Projects, Resources, and Classes;
11.4 Creating Game Objects;
11.5 Conclusion;
11.6 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 12: Games, Objects, and State;
12.1 Introduction;
12.2 Adding Bread to Your Game;
12.3 Adding Tomato Targets;
12.4 Conclusion;
12.5 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 13: Making a Complete Game;
13.1 Introduction;
13.2 Making a Finished Game;
13.3 Improving Code Design;
13.4 Adding a Background;
13.5 Adding a Title Screen;
13.6 Conclusion;
13.7 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 14: Classes, Objects, and Games;
14.1 Introduction;
14.2 Design with Objects;
14.3 Classes and Structures;
14.4 References;
14.5 Value and Reference Types;
14.6 Creating a Sprite Class Hierarchy;
14.7 Adding a Deadly Pepper;
14.8 Conclusion;
14.9 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 15: Creating Game Components;
15.1 Introduction;
15.2 Objects and Abstraction;
15.3 Constructing Class Instances;
15.4 Adding 100 Killer Tangerines;
15.5 Adding Artificial Intelligence;
15.6 Adding Game Sounds;
15.7 From Objects to Components;
15.8 Conclusion;
15.9 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 16: Creating Multi-Player Networked Games;
16.1 Introduction;
16.2 Networks and Computers;
16.3 Xbox Live;
16.4 Bread and Cheese Pong;
16.5 Conclusion;
16.6 Chapter Review Questions;
Making Mobile Games for Windows Phone 7 with XNA;
Chapter 17: Motion-Sensitive Games;
17.1 Introduction;
17.2 The Accelerometer;
17.3 Acceleration and Physics;
17.4 Creating a “Cheese Lander” Tipping Game;
17.5 Conclusion;
17.6 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 18: Exploring Touch Input;
18.1 Introduction;
18.2 The Windows Phone Touch Screen;
18.3 Creating a Panic Button;
18.4 Creating a Touch Drumpad;
18.5 Creating a Shuffleboard Game;
18.6 Conclusion;
18.7 Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 19: Mobile Game Development;
19.1 Introduction;
19.2 The Windows Phone;
19.3 Maximizing the Phone Battery Life in XNA Games;
19.4 Dealing with Changes in Phone Orientation;
19.5 Using a Specific Display Size for Windows Phone Games;
19.6 Hiding the Windows Phone Status Bar;
19.7 Stopping the Screen Timeout from Turning Off Your Game;
19.8 Creating a Phone State Machine;
19.9 Handing Incoming Phone Calls;
19.10 A Game as a Windows Phone Application;
19.11 Getting Your Games into the Marketplace;
19.12 Conclusion;
19.13 Chapter Review Questions;
Answers to the Chapter Review Questions;
Chapter 1;
Chapter 2;
Chapter 3;
Chapter 4;
Chapter 5;
Chapter 6;
Chapter 7;
Chapter 8;
Chapter 9;
Chapter 10;
Chapter 11;
Chapter 12;
Chapter 13;
Chapter 14;
Chapter 15;
Chapter 16;
Chapter 17;
Chapter 18;
Chapter 19;
About the Author;
Rob Miles;

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Microsoft XNA Game Studio 4.0: Learn Programming Now!: How to program for Windows Phone 7, Xbox 360, Zune devices, and more 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
gman570 More than 1 year ago
Good for learning c# even with no programming expirence. Goes through each step in detail.
Dexterously More than 1 year ago
This book was a great read. Although you are not required to have extensive knowledge of C# I think it would help to understand this book better. If you haven't programmed games before, this is the book for you. It is great because it covers those concepts and what I liked most about it is that the same code can work on all three platforms with just little extra code to accommodate the form factor. I strongly recommend this book to anyone looking into getting into game development for Microsoft's platforms. It's a fun read and it is covered with great tips to make your code more efficient and write once but expand it everywhere. In my opinion he should've spent more time on integrating graphics with code and making renders etc. but it's more oriented towards programmers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago