Middle Men [NOOK Book]

Overview

In this widely acclaimed story collection, Jim Gavin delivers a hilarious and panoramic vision of California, in which a number of down-on-their-luck men, from young dreamers to old vets, make valiant forays into middle-class respectability. Each of the men in Gavin’s stories is stuck somewhere in the middle, caught halfway between his dreams and the often crushing reality of his life. A work of profound humanity that pairs moments of high comedy with searing truths about life’s missed opportunities, Middle Men ...
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Middle Men

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Overview

In this widely acclaimed story collection, Jim Gavin delivers a hilarious and panoramic vision of California, in which a number of down-on-their-luck men, from young dreamers to old vets, make valiant forays into middle-class respectability. Each of the men in Gavin’s stories is stuck somewhere in the middle, caught halfway between his dreams and the often crushing reality of his life. A work of profound humanity that pairs moments of high comedy with searing truths about life’s missed opportunities, Middle Men brings to life unforgettable characters as they learn what it means to love and work and exist in the world as a man.

Hailed as a “modern-day Dubliners” (Time Out ) and “reminiscent of Tom Perotta’s best work” (The Boston Globe), this stellar debut has the Los Angeles Review of Books raving, “Middle Men deserves its hype and demonstrates a top-shelf talent. . . . A brilliant sense of humor animates each story and creates a state of near-continuous reading pleasure.”
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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Marisa Silver
A generous humanity and a fond wit animate Jim Gavin's wonderful first collection…Gavin's stories revolve around a familiar theme—men searching for identity and meaning—but they're distinguished by his more specific concerns: how work shapes lives, and the differences in the way the young and the old confront the humbling problem of ambition and success. Gavin's characters…are sons of journeymen, low-paid assistants and traveling salesmen. These men know, or are beginning to suspect, that the mark they will make on the world is small. But Middle Men doesn't wallow in pessimism; with deft portraiture, nimble prose and an intimacy with the lives of his amiable characters, Gavin shows us that the real work of a life takes place not when the sale is made but when the salesman goes back home, looks in a half-empty refrigerator and considers his options.
Publishers Weekly
When it comes to truth-in-advertising, it doesn't get much droller than the title of Stegner fellow Gavin's debut story collection, which does indeed compile a menagerie of unprepossessing California menfolk. Slackers, dropouts, the semiemployed, and the simply maladroit, Gavin's young protagonists may not exactly be a credit to their generation, but they make for the kind of fiction that catches you off guard and brutalizes you with humor. Thus "Bermuda" concerns an Echo Park miscreant's courtly pursuit of an ex-groupie (in between Nintendo binges); a game show production assistant staggers adrift in a world of trivia in "Elephant Doors"; and "Play the Man" gives us a singularly unmotivated varsity basketball player's coming-of-age. These are paeans to extended adolescence and mediocrity, but the collection's best stories are much more than opportunities for pity and Gen-X pathos: "Bewildered Decisions in Times of Mercantile Terror," for example, coaxes profundity and hope out of the parallel struggles of a would-be boy inventor (he's working on something called "The Man Handler") and his solvent-but-damaged cousin, Nora. Finally, the book's two-part title story is the definitive father-and-son plumbing equipment salesmen picaresque. In tracing the careers of the basically unemployable, Gavin speaks with authority, and his colloquial, detail-driven dialogue oscillates nicely between Flaubert and The Simpsons. Sad and overtly hysterical, the stories dodge self-pity and indie quirk for pensive American tales of turn-of-the-20th century manchildren gesturing vaguely toward a future of eroded opportunity. Agent: PJ Mark, Janklow & Nesbit. (Feb.)
Booklist
“Distinctive and powerful….Gavin plumbs the hearts and minds of his men with laserlike accuracy, but he also brings surprising humor to the stories, especially in the relief that his characters often feel when they realize that they won’t be able to live up to their own expectations.”
author of Zombie Spaceship Wasteland - Patton Oswalt
"Jim Gavin's Middle Men is perfectly titled — these are characters gloriously unaware of how adrift they are. Gnostic high school basketballers, romantic pursuers, open mic comedians — I've rarely seen such a keen depiction of souls so out of focus. These stories — especially "Elephant Doors" — brought back some hilarious, uncomfortable memories for me. Immerse yourself! Immerse!"
author of Union Atlantic - Adam Haslett
"The best debut collection of short stories I've read in a very long time."
author of The Ask - Sam Lipsyte
“Jim Gavin’s stories are wise and funny and not at all afraid of the dark, or the light. Middle Men is a very powerful debut.”
author of Drift and This Vacant Paradise - Victoria Patterson
“With its sharply drawn characters, its humor and affection and melancholy, its deep wisdom of the ways we live and cope and endure, and its panoramic and precise vision of California, Middle Men is a phenomenal story collection, and Jim Gavin an extravagantly talented writer. I could not put this book down. Gavin brings the California and SoCal I know and love to the page with searing intelligence, beauty, and an emotive force, making Middle Men one of the finest and most unusual fictions I’ve read in years.”
author of The Eden Hunter and The Southern Cross - Skip Horack
“Like the heroes of this stunning collection, Jim Gavin’s stories negotiate and illuminate the gray, authentic middle, bridging the divide that exists between California’s—and indeed, America’s—golden mythology and her starker realities. There is deep truth, beauty, and humor to be found in this territory, and in Gavin we have found the ultimate emissary. This book is an absolute triumph of sympathy and revelation.”
author of You Think That's Bad and Liked You'd Understand, Anyway - Jim Shepard
“I love the wit and intelligence and rigor with which Jim Gavin renders characters who find themselves spiraling down the water column. Middle Men is peerless in its portraits of American males dimly coming to appreciate the disastrous convergence of their own fecklessness and feelings of entitlement with the increasingly unforgiving hard times bearing down on them, and on most of the rest of us as well.”
Time Out
"Gavin's debut short-story collection reads like a modern-day Dubliners. . . . Middle Men finds wonder in the most ordinary places and, even in bleak situations, it elevates the everyday doldrums in a way that's closer to comedy than tragedy."
The New York Times
“The stories in Mr. Gavin's first collection are carved from the follies and frustrated longings of modern manhood….[He] strikes a fine balance in each tale, wielding a sharp sense of humor but never losing sight of people's dignity.”
Time Out (4 stars)
"Gavin's debut short-story collection reads like a modern-day Dubliners. . . . Middle Men finds wonder in the most ordinary places and, even in bleak situations, it elevates the everyday doldrums in a way that's closer to comedy than tragedy."
From the Publisher
“The stories in Mr. Gavin's first collection are carved from the follies and frustrated longings of modern manhood….[He] strikes a fine balance in each tale, wielding a sharp sense of humor but never losing sight of people's dignity.”

"Gavin's debut short-story collection reads like a modern-day Dubliners. . . . Middle Men finds wonder in the most ordinary places and, even in bleak situations, it elevates the everyday doldrums in a way that's closer to comedy than tragedy."

“Who is Jim Gavin? The second coming of Denis Johnson if his debut collection is any indication. These sad, funny stories about nowhere men—some young, some bent-backed, all pained and searching for something they’ll never find—knocked me out….These short stories will transport you, will educate you, will entertain you, will fill you with fear and laughter and sadness.”

"Jim Gavin's Middle Men is perfectly titled — these are characters gloriously unaware of how adrift they are. Gnostic high school basketballers, romantic pursuers, open mic comedians — I've rarely seen such a keen depiction of souls so out of focus. These stories — especially "Elephant Doors" — brought back some hilarious, uncomfortable memories for me. Immerse yourself! Immerse!"

"The best debut collection of short stories I've read in a very long time."

“Jim Gavin’s stories are wise and funny and not at all afraid of the dark, or the light. Middle Men is a very powerful debut.”

“With its sharply drawn characters, its humor and affection and melancholy, its deep wisdom of the ways we live and cope and endure, and its panoramic and precise vision of California, Middle Men is a phenomenal story collection, and Jim Gavin an extravagantly talented writer. I could not put this book down. Gavin brings the California and SoCal I know and love to the page with searing intelligence, beauty, and an emotive force, making Middle Men one of the finest and most unusual fictions I’ve read in years.”

“Like the heroes of this stunning collection, Jim Gavin’s stories negotiate and illuminate the gray, authentic middle, bridging the divide that exists between California’s—and indeed, America’s—golden mythology and her starker realities. There is deep truth, beauty, and humor to be found in this territory, and in Gavin we have found the ultimate emissary. This book is an absolute triumph of sympathy and revelation.”

“I love the wit and intelligence and rigor with which Jim Gavin renders characters who find themselves spiraling down the water column. Middle Men is peerless in its portraits of American males dimly coming to appreciate the disastrous convergence of their own fecklessness and feelings of entitlement with the increasingly unforgiving hard times bearing down on them, and on most of the rest of us as well.”

“Gavin's exceptional debut collection, set mainly in southern California, harkens to an earlier literary Los Angeles…[Middle Men is] the best kind of satire: barbed and hilarious, but suffused with compassion.”

Los Angeles Review of Books
Middle Men deserves its hype and demonstrates a top-shelf talent….A brilliant sense of humor that animates each story and creates a state of near-continuous reading pleasure….A superlative debut.”
Boston Globe
“Excellent….extremely entertaining….Gavin’s writing delivers jab after jab, the hilarious and the poignant mingling in compelling ways….He has a way of quickly and vividly drawing the minor characters who drift in and out of his stories….Overall, Gavin’s writing is eminently readable and reminiscent of some of Tom Perrotta’s best work.”
Time Out Chicago
“With impressive precision, [Gavin] describes everything from being creatively unfulfilled to dodging landlords looking for back rent…. his writing achieves new insight, power and grace.”
'Faces to Watch' The Los Angeles Times
“Middle Men” aspires to do what ambitious fiction has always done: show the world (especially the world we think we know) in a way that's recognizable and revealing, while telling us something fundamental about where and how we live.”
'What to Read in 2013' Chicago Tribune
“New Yorker contributor Jim Gavin's debut story collection, praised as "exceptional" in a starred Kirkus review, portrays a group of men whose dreams are at odds with the reality of their lives.”
Atlantic Wire
“A book of hilarious and moving short stories from New Yorker contributor Gavin, who portrays a group of men of various ages in California as they try to find that space somewhere between their dreams and their actual lives.”
AM New York (interview)
“A hilarious and moving debut of stories.”
The Millions
“[A] superb debut collection….laugh-out-loud funny…. all of Gavin’s stories are gems….Middle Men [is], as all good collections should be, greater in total than merely a succession of well-crafted stories.”
Brooklyn Rail
Middle Men is a fantastic book…The stories here that stick the hardest…are symphonic triumphs, gut-wrenchers of male life.”
PopMatters.com
“[Gavin’s] debut dramatizes, in odd or mundane circumstances, the surprises that quiet epiphanies can present to the attentive wanderer.”
Examiner.com
“In this brilliant debut of short stories, Jim Gavin manages to humorously cover a cross-section of sad men – of all ages – going mindlessly through the motions of life, some with hope, many without. The collection would be sad if not for Gavin’s knack for pointing out the humor in the mundane.”
"Faces to Watch 2013" Los Angeles Times
“Middle Men” aspires to do what ambitious fiction has always done: show the world (especially the world we think we know) in a way that's recognizable and revealing, while telling us something fundamental about where and how we live.”
"What to Read in 2013" Chicago Tribune
“New Yorker contributor Jim Gavin's debut story collection, praised as "exceptional" in a starred Kirkus review, portrays a group of men whose dreams are at odds with the reality of their lives.”
OCWeekly.com
“Jim Gavin is the real deal….[he] confronts [Southern California] with the power and weary enthusiasm of a D.J. Waldie, Joan Didion or Raymond Chandler….Perfect.”
Zyzzyva.org
“Sad and funny…Middle Men captures its mishap-prone and chronically underemployed characters on the cusp of moving beyond their muddled dreams of grandeur.”
Omaha World Herald
“Gavin's characters are funny and sad….These lovable souls have held onto their dignity but not a whole lot more….This is a writer who understands both the painful and the beautiful moments that make up a human life, and spending time with his characters is a great gift. This collection is a triumph of storytelling and Gavin's loose, relaxed prose is nearly perfect.”
Esquire
“Who is Jim Gavin? The second coming of Denis Johnson if his debut collection is any indication. These sad, funny stories about nowhere men—some young, some bent-backed, all pained and searching for something they’ll never find—knocked me out….These short stories will transport you, will educate you, will entertain you, will fill you with fear and laughter and sadness.”
Library Journal
Gavin's debut collection chronicles the dudes of Los Angeles, moving from a high school basketball player to a widowed toilet salesman, a sad but soulful collection of losers, underachievers, slackers, and misfits linked mainly by a fondness for Del Taco. In the particularly memorable "Elephant Doors," a morose aspiring comedian's day job as a production assistant on a Jeopardy-like game show is threatened when he gets dragged into the pedantic host's sordid personal life. Only one, "Bewildered Decisions in Times of Mercantile Terror," features a female protagonist, a high-achieving Type-A striver, quite unlike the male characters, who nonetheless flames out in spectacular fashion in the end. Though these are largely tales of men failing in their endeavors and scraping by from disappointment to disappointment, lowering their expectations as they lose jobs, girlfriends, and homes, they are uniformly laugh-out-loud funny. VERDICT As the lizard at the bottom of the pool in the title story could tell you, there are no happily ever-afters in this stellar collection marked by an irreverent, deadpan humor and postmodern sensibility. [See Prepub Alert, 8/27/12.]—Lauren Gilbert, Sachem P.L., Holbrook, NY
Kirkus Reviews
Gavin's exceptional debut collection, set mainly in southern California, harkens to an earlier literary Los Angeles, that of Nathanael West, who, in The Day of the Locust, called Hollywood a "dream dump...the Sargasso of the imagination." Gavin's bleakly funny, inventive stories feature hapless men caught between dire, pitiless reality--busted loves, dead parents, stillborn careers--and a golden (or at least spray-paint–gilded) mythology of manhood and of success that they can neither believe in nor bring themselves (quite) to throw out. Several stories feature young men making disastrous decisions and then following them to their conclusions in a way that would seem bathetic except that these young men, not having the consolation of delusion, steam toward misery with eyes open and mordant wit intact. There's the impoverished 20-something in "Bermuda" who gets himself fired from his job as a Meals on Wheels deliveryman so as to chase his reluctant beloved to her new job teaching music in paradise. He does this not to win her back--that's not in the cards, and he knows it--but because he sees that the only way out of the narrative he's foolishly invested so much in is to keep spiraling down to its humiliating end. In "Elephant Doors," an assistant to a mercurial, Belgium-obsessed quiz-show host is made to wriggle through a doggy door in the house of his ex-wife on a commando mission that cannot end but badly. The protagonist of "Illuminati" is a battered screenwriter still trying, long after the glory has faded, to nourish both himself and the "exalted visions I had of my future" off the proceeds from his one payday--for a "multi-ethnic buddy cop adventure comedy" called Hyde & Sikh. The poignant finale is a diptych about father-and-son toilet salesmen, the old man a veteran who feels most at home traversing the freeways, the son a fish hopelessly out of water, both bereft after the slow death by cancer of the woman--mother and wife--they loved. The best kind of satire: barbed and hilarious, but suffused with compassion.
The Barnes & Noble Review

Middle Men, Jim Gavin's first collection of stories, takes its title from the book's final two-story pairing but could also describe the central characters of every one of these poignant, comedy-flecked entries. In most of them we find a young man drifting between the expectations of youth and the elusive, maybe impossible success—or at least condition—of adulthood. It is a makeshift stretch of existence, sometimes a rather lengthy one before destiny's verdict comes in. Gavin's young men are not what you might call on the ball, and their stories can begin "As a boy, Matt Costello often wondered what his dad did when he left the house in the morning," or "Bobby's office, for the time being, was the Berkeley Public Library."

Take Brian of "Bermuda." He is twenty-three-years old and lives in a crummy apartment with a lot of roommates and hangers-on: "My room was one-half of the living room and my mattress was a single, a mighty single, floating on a sea of thin brown carpet." He has a part-time job delivering Meals on Wheels and falls in love with Karen, a pianist ten years his senior, a drifter of sorts. Matters come to a head when Karen moves to Bermuda to teach music at a private school and Brian manages to borrow just enough money to pursue her there. ("I passed a little park and saw two private-school kids in blazers, sharing a cigarette and cursing in their dainty little accents.") The result is a dose of reality beautifully managed by Gavin, who subtly contrasts this futile chapter in his character's life with a brief glimpse at a future.

Gavin's comic gift and sharp eye for fatuousness are evident in "Elephant Doors." The main character, Adam, would seem at first to know what he's doing: He's a production assistant at a Hollywood TV- studio complex—a lowly position, yes, but the envy of those less fortunate. Alas, his real ambition is to be a stand-up comic. He attends a weekly open-mike event, a gruelingly awful affair held under the auspices of an aging stoner and bar owner called Frankie: "Every Friday, Frankie sat in the back of his crappy bar, laughing generously and running outrageous tabs. Adam thought of Father Damien among the lepers."

The prospect of what Adam is sure will be a knockout performance at the mike brings him a sense of his future: "He looked down Lincoln Boulevard, a treeless span of auto body shops, futon outlets, and discount shoe emporiums. Adam savored these sights, knowing that someday, in a nostalgic mood, he would look back fondly on his tawdry origins." The problem is, as his act shows with excruciating clarity, Adam is profoundly unfunny and after his performance his spirits take a dive: "He was waiting for something to click. In books and interviews all of his comic heroes had described a moment onstage when, after stumbling for many years, they suddenly, and oftentimes, inadvertently, became themselves." His existential predicament is typical of Gavin's characters: "He imagined the two versions of himself—the young fraud and the old pro—standing on either side of a dark chasm. If there was some blessed third version of himself, the middle man who could bridge the gap, Adam saw no trace of him in the darkness."

Most of these stories are set in the Southern California of fast food outlets, warehouses, swampy swimming pools, browned golf courses, real estate booms and busts, and the limbo of the freeways. "The Luau," the first of the stories that make up Middle Men, gives us Matt Costello, mentioned above, the son of a plumbing-supplies rep. He left college to care for his dying mother, an act that was both kind and a chance to introduce direction into his own life. "When he moved home it felt like a relief because he had a purpose; each day he knew exactly what he had to do, and nobody expected anything from him" After his mother's death, Matt is simply stuck and motiveless, waiting, as Galvin's characters tend to, for something to happen. Finally his father gets him a job in the plumbing supplies business.

This is its own world. Peopled with chancers and canny adepts, it is tough and arcane, a business where a widely distributed faulty ballcock has a seismic effect, and where plumbing supplies are sold according to "a strange and mystifying calculus." The process (whereby "factory sold to the rep, the rep to the wholesaler, the wholesaler to the contractor, but sometimes the rep skipped a step and talked directly to the contractor, telling him which wholesaler to buy from?") is as byzantine as it is obnoxious to the MBAs who have arrived—we learn in the following story—to plant the kiss of death on the whole idiosyncratic sales culture.

Here I should note that jobs are woven into Gavin's stories—as they are not in the fiction of most other writers—in an essential and enriching way. Matt's tour of the world of plumbing-supplies is that of a na?f among a vanishing breed of men, and offers a view of the life which, as it happens, he won't have. That life belongs to his father, Martin, the center of "Costello," a sales rep who averages 50,000 miles a year on the freeways. He is now floating between the past and the death of his wife a year ago, and the future which holds the extinction of his sort of job and the inevitable loss of his house sinking under three mortgages.

"Three mortgages, babe, each one more magnificent than the last." That statement captures what we like about Matt, his spirit in the face of bad luck and past decisions. It's Saturday, after all, and he has his pool with its raft and the sports page, crossword puzzle, cigarettes, Zippo, and a copy of the industry paper, the Pipeline, announcing that he's been nominated for sales rep of the year. He sees himself as Magellan becalmed in the Doldrums. Adversity and disappointment come to him in this story, but he, like all of Gavin's characters at their own junctures in life, is not unmanned or as adequately defeated as his circumstances would seem to demand.

If Gavin has a weakness, it is that he ends some stories with a sudden over-portentous act—tearing up a check, shaving a head, flipping a dead animal into another man's pool—but that is an affliction to which short stories are prone. Otherwise, these stories with their fine calibrations of bleakness, comedy, and compassion beautifully conjure the emotional perplexity of people afloat. They are superb and suggest that, for Jim Gavin at least, there truly is a promising future.

Katherine A. Powers reviews books widely and has been a finalist for the Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing from the National Book Critics Circle.

Reviewer: Katherine A. Powers

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781451649369
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 2/19/2013
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 453,441
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Jim Gavin’s fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Zoetrope, Esquire, Slice, The Mississippi Review, and ZYZZYVA. He lives in Los Angeles.
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 6 of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2013

    And leggolas is female

    Omg. Yuck

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2013

    Galad

    Gn

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2013

    Gandalf

    Hmmph.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2013

    Strider

    Runs in* Viola!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2013

    Pippin

    Wanders aimlessly, trying to figure out what to do.

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