Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life

( 115 )

Overview

On April 10, 1994, PBS stations nationwide will air the first episode of a lavish six-part Masterpiece Theatre production of Eliot's brilliant work, Middlemarch, hosted by Russell Baker and produced by Louis Marks. The Modern Library is pleased to offer this official companion edition, complete with tie-in art and printed on acid-free paper. Unabridged.
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
This Paperback (Mass Market Paperback) is Not Available through BN.com
Middlemarch (Collins Classics)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - ePub edition)
$0.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

On April 10, 1994, PBS stations nationwide will air the first episode of a lavish six-part Masterpiece Theatre production of Eliot's brilliant work, Middlemarch, hosted by Russell Baker and produced by Louis Marks. The Modern Library is pleased to offer this official companion edition, complete with tie-in art and printed on acid-free paper. Unabridged.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Another great romantic story, in which the adorable intellectually pretentious heroine makes a disastrous marriage to a desiccated fossil before finding true love with a penniless somebody."  —Jilly Cooper

"Perhaps the greatest novel of them all . . . An enormous canvas and a vast and poignant range of character . . . a marvellous portrait of nineteenth-century provincial life."  —Joanna Trollope

"In Middlemarch George Eliot's serious intelligence produced a novel that no one else could have been capable of—a picture of society as an organic, living, breathing synthesis—order and disorder, hope and hopelessness, pride and humility, charity and greed."  —Kate Atkinson

Michael McKeon Rutgers University
"Broadview Press and editor Gregory Maertz have produced a text whose rich but judicious contextual annotation, notably highlighting Eliot's deep immersion in German culture, makes this a crucial edition of what is arguably the greatest Victorian novel of them all."
Mark Turner King's College
"Gregory Maertz's fine new edition of Middlemarch allows readers to consider the novel in relation to a range of documents—reviews and other writings by George Eliot, contemporary reviews of the novel, and contextual material. This additional material both enriches our reading of the novel and its concerns and expands our knowledge of the period."
From Barnes & Noble
Strangled by the confining terms of her late husband's will, an idealistic young woman throws herself into the struggle for medical reforms advocated by a visionary doctor. Considered by many to be Eliot's finest work and one of the best novels in English ever written.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451501677
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 12/1/1968
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 5.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

GEORGE ELIOT was born in Nuneaton on November 22, 1819. Baptized Mary Anne Evans, Eliot chose to write using a male pen name. She was sent away to school but returned when her mother died in 1836. She later moved to Coventry with her father. After her father's death she became the Assistant Editor of the Westminster Review in 1851. She also met George Henry Lewes this year and they became partners for the rest of his life. Lewes was already married, although he and his wife both considered their relationship to be an open one, but he and Eliot set up home together, much to the dismay of polite London society. In 1857 Eliot published Amos Barton in Blackwood's Magazine and in 1859 her novel Adam Bede was published to great acclaim.

Her first attempt to write Middlemarch, her most famous novel, ended in failure. Abandoning it, she began a short novella entitled Miss Brooke which was eventually integrated into the final version of Middlemarch. The novel was published serially in eight parts in 1871. Lewes died in 1878 and Eliot married again in 1880. Her husband, John Walter Cross was an American who was twenty years her junior. George Eliot died on December 22, 1880 at 4 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea and is buried in Highgate Cemetery next to Lewes.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

WHO that cares much to know the history of man, and how the mysterious mixture behaves under the varying experiments of Time, has not dwelt, at least briefly, on the life of Saint Theresa,' has not smiled with some gentleness at the thought of the little girl walking forth one morning hand - in - hand with her still smaller brother, to go and seek martyrdom in the country of the Moors? Out they toddled from rugged Avila, wide - eyed and helpless - looking as two fawns, but with human hearts, already beating to a national idea; until domestic reality met them in the shape of uncles, and turned them back from their great resolve. That child - pilgrimage was a fit beginning. Theresa's passionate, ideal nature demanded an epic life: what were many - volumed romances of chivalry and the social conquests of a brilliant girl to her. Her flame quickly burned up that light fuel; and, fed from within, soared after some illimitable satisfaction, some object which would never justify weariness, which would reconcile self - despair with the rapturous consciousness of life beyond self. She found her epos in the reform of a religious order.
That Spanish woman who lived three hundred years ago was certainly not the last of her kind. Many Theresas have been born who found for themselves no epic life wherein there was a constant unfolding of far - resonant action; perhaps only a life of mistakes, the offspring of a certain spiritual grandeur ill - matched with the meanness of opportunity; perhaps a tragic failure which found no sacred poet and sank unwept into oblivion. With dim lights and tangled circumstance they tried to shape their thought and deed in noble agreement; but after all, tocommon eyes their struggles seemed mere inconsistency and formlessness; for these later - born Theresas were helped by no coherent social faith and order which could perform the function of knowledge for the ardently willing soul. Their ardour alternated between a vague ideal and the common yearning of womanhood; so that the one was disapproved as extravagance, and the other condemned as a lapse.
Some have felt that these blundering lives are due to the inconvenient indefiniteness with which the Supreme Power has fashioned the natures of women: if there were one level of feminine incompetence as strict as the ability to count three and no more, the social lot of women might be treated with scientific certitude. Meanwhile the indefiniteness remains, and the limits of variation are really much wider than any one would imagine from the sameness of women's coiffure and the favourite love - stories in prose and verse. Here and there a cygnet is reared uneasily among the ducklings in the brown pond, and never finds the living stream in fellowship with its own oary-footed kind. Here and there is born a Saint Theresa, foundress of nothing, whose loving heart -beats and sobs after an unattained goodness tremble off and are dispersed among hindrances, instead of centering in some long recognisable deed.


Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
George Eliot: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text
Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life
Appendix A: George Eliot’s Essays, Reviews, and Criticism
1. "Woman in France: Madame de Sablé," Westminster Review (October 1854)
2. "The Morality of Wilhelm Meister," The Leader (21 July 1855)
3. "Margaret Fuller and Mary Wollstonecraft," The Leader (13 October 1855)
4. Review of John Ruskin's Modern Painters (1856), Westminster Review (April1856)
5. "The Natural History of German Life," Westminster Review (July 1856)
6. "Silly Novels by Lady Novelists," Westminster Review (October 1856)
Appendix B: Contemporary Reviews of Middlemarch
1. Edward Dowden, "George Eliot," Contemporary Review (August 1872)
2. Richard Holt Hutton, review of Middlemarch, Spectator (7 December 1872)
3. Edith Simcox, "Middlemarch," Academy (1 January 1873)
4. [Henry James], unsigned review, Galaxy (March 1873)
5. [William Hurrell Mallock], unsigned review of Impressions of Theophrastus Such (1879), Edinburgh Review (October 1879)
6. Margaret Oliphant, Chapter XI, "Of the Younger Novelists," The Victorian Age of English Literature (1882)
7. Sir John Emerich Edward Dalberg, first Baron Acton, "George Eliot’s Life," Nineteenth Century (March 1885)
8. Virginia Woolf, "George Eliot," Times Literary Supplement (20 November 1919)
Appendix C: Historical Documents: Medical Reform, Religious Freedom, and the Advent of the Railroads
1. "The Apothecaries Act" (1815)
2. "The Roman Catholic Relief Act" (1829)
3. "An Act to amend the representation of the people in England and Wales" (1832)
4. "An Act for regulating Schools of Anatomy" (1832)
5. Liverpool and Manchester Railroad Company Prospectus (1824)
6. [Commentary on the projected Liverpool and Manchester Railway], Quarterly Review (March 1825)
7. "An Act to consolidate and amend the Acts relating to the Property of Married Women" (1882)
Select Bibliography
Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

1. Discuss the relationship between religious and secular, spiritual and worldly, in the novel. Is it conflicted or not? Why?

2. What is Eliot's view of ambition in its different forms-social, intellectual, political? How is this evident in the novel?

3. In her introduction, A. S. Byatt contends that Eliot was "the great English novelist of ideas." How do you interpret this? How do you think ideas-human thought-inform the plot of Middlemarch?

4. George Eliot is a pseudonym for Mary Ann Evans. How does Eliot's femaleness-and her concealing of it-add resonance to the novel, if at all? Do you see Dorothea's character differently in this regard? Do you see Middlemarch as a "women's" novel?

5. Middlemarch was originally published in serial form, a single book at a time. What kinds of concerns affected Eliot's narrative in this regard? How do these discrete segments differ from the whole?

6. Discuss the convention of marriage in the novel. Do you feel it ultimately restricts the characters? Or is it the novel's provincial setting that proves more oppressive?

7. Discuss the metaphor of Dorothea as St. Theresa. What is Eliot saying here?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 115 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(49)

4 Star

(17)

3 Star

(18)

2 Star

(15)

1 Star

(16)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 51 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 6, 2010

    Bad Version

    This version of Middlemarch crashed my Nook repeatedly. I opted to download a different version.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2003

    a soap opera to read

    this book illustrates the imagination that Eliot had. it is very comlex and deep with content. there are so many different conflicts and themes to learn from in this book. the lessons that are tought throughout the book make this novel worth reading. i do not reccomend this book to people who do not like a challenge when they read because this book calls for a good memory and patience for the parts that get kind of slow. the book switches around a lot on the characters, telling one story and then jumping to another about someone else. this book calls for a lot of thinking and i can see now why this was called a brilliant masterpiece. there is so much to read and so many people to learn about before you can get in to the book . i recommend this book to the advanced readers.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2004

    Timeless

    This is a story about the timeless issues of the self and of human relationships, love, decency and corruption, society's virtues and vices. A good book if you like classics, however I do not recommend it if one is not up for a long reading...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2003

    Great Classic Book!

    I really enjoyed how George Eliot made you feel like you were apart of Middlemarch. By the end of the book you really feel like you knew the people personally. This is the first George Eliot book I have read, but I look forward to reading more.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2003

    All about Middlemarch

    Middlemarch was a good book but it was not as great as I thought it would be. I definetly recommend this book to other people because I am sure they will like it a little more than me. I was interested in many parts of the book, but I just thought it was a little drawn out. I am not a big time reader to I usually don't like to read the same book for a week or so.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2003

    B.R. Student 5/03

    Middlemarch is a good novel set in the early ninetenth century in England. Eliot gives the novel many character's to show different examples of what life was like in England in 1832. The style is very similar to a modern soap opera. The novel, just as a soap opera, has many families that live in the same town and somehow are all connected. I recommend people read Middlemarch to learn about everyday life during the 1830's. Eliot shows the reader how the lives of the character's in the novel are affected due to all the historical changes and events. The novel is very long and at times a little dry, so I recommend that you have a lot of time to read and enjoy the novel fully. Middlemarch is a great example of victorian literature, creating real enents with Eliot's character's.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2000

    A Victorian dessert

    For those who enjoy social novels and don't mind the number of pages this excellent overlook of the life in Victorian England will supplement with all necessary stuff for the great novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2000

    a mirror of humanity

    Middlemarch is deffinatly a great work of literature. There is a huge variety of characters and they strangely mirror ourselves. I recommend this book, but it must be read when you have a lot of time and you must be persistant, because there are many boring parts and the plot flows leisurely and at a very slow pase.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 51 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)