Midnight at Marble Arch (Thomas and Charlotte Pitt Series #28)

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Overview

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER ? NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY RT BOOK REVIEWS

In this superbly accomplished new Charlotte and Thomas Pitt adventure, Anne Perry takes us beneath the glittering surface of wealthy Victorian society into a nightmare world of fear and intimidation, where women are too often blamed for the violent attacks against them, and powerful men ...
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Midnight at Marble Arch (Thomas and Charlotte Pitt Series #28)

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Overview

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY RT BOOK REVIEWS

In this superbly accomplished new Charlotte and Thomas Pitt adventure, Anne Perry takes us beneath the glittering surface of wealthy Victorian society into a nightmare world of fear and intimidation, where women are too often blamed for the violent attacks against them, and powerful men take what they want, leaving others to pay the price.
 
The horrifying rape and apparent suicide of Catherine Quixwood, wife of a wealthy merchant banker, falls outside the jurisdiction of new Special Branch head Thomas Pitt, but so pervasively offensive are the rumors about the victim that Pitt quietly takes a hand in the investigation.
 
Yet even with the help of his ingenious wife, Charlotte, and his former superior, Victor Narraway, Pitt is stumped. Why did high-minded, cultured Catherine choose not to accompany her husband to a grand party on the night of her demise? Why did she dismiss all her servants for the evening and leave the front door unlocked? What had been her relationship with the young man seen frequently by her side at concerts and art exhibits? And what can be done to avenge another terrible crime: the assault on Angeles Castelbranco, beloved teenage daughter of the Portuguese ambassador?
 
As an ordinary policeman, Pitt used to enter London’s grand houses through the kitchen door. Now, as a guest in those same houses, can he find the steel in his soul to challenge the great men of the world with their crimes? The path to the truth takes him in deeply troubling directions, from the lofty world of international politics and finance to his own happy home, where his own teenage daughter, Jemima, is coming of age in a culture rife with hidden dangers.
 
In this rich, emotionally charged masterpiece, Anne Perry exposes yet another ugly secret of Victoria’s proud empire. And in a courtroom battle of unparalleled brilliance, we thrill at the chance to witness a massive wrong righted.

Includes a preview of Anne Perry’s next Charlotte and Thomas Pitt novel, Death on Blackheath

Praise for Midnight at Marble Arch
 
“Sweeping and scandalous . . . Perry has perfected a delicate touch.”The New York Times Book Review
 
“Fresh and vibrant . . . Perry captures Victorian England with flair, and her storyline is fascinating.”—Wichita Falls Times Record News

“Perry is a master at illuminating the wrongs of the Victorian age.”Booklist (starred review)
 
“Bestselling author Perry continues her Charlotte and Thomas Pitt series with another splendid success. She is so familiar with life at this time that history, attitudes and culture are slipped in seamlessly so the reader sees the world as Victorians did. Not only are Inspector Pitt and his wife fully realized, their circle of friends and acquaintances also feel real and alive. This is a series to read from the beginning.”RT Book Reviews (Top Pick)
 
“May be [Perry’s] most intense and thrilling novel to date . . . Midnight at Marble Arch is stunning and insightful from start to finish.”—Bookreporter
 
“This book is packed with intrigue.”—The Huffington Post
 
“The monsters Anne Perry creates are not easy to live with, and their actions linger long after the book is closed.”—New York Journal of Books
 
“Engrossing . . . intriguing . . . Perry does a nice job exploring late Victorian attitudes toward sex crimes.”Publishers Weekly

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Sweeping and scandalous . . . [Anne] Perry has perfected a delicate touch.”The New York Times Book Review
 
“Fresh and vibrant . . . Perry captures Victorian England with flair, and her storyline is fascinating.”—Wichita Falls Times Record News

“Perry is a master at illuminating the wrongs of the Victorian age.”Booklist (starred review)
 
“Bestselling author Perry continues her Charlotte and Thomas Pitt series with another splendid success. She is so familiar with life at this time that history, attitudes and culture are slipped in seamlessly so the reader sees the world as Victorians did. Not only are Inspector Pitt and his wife fully realized, their circle of friends and acquaintances also feel real and alive. This is a series to read from the beginning.”RT Book Reviews (Top Pick)
 
“May be [Perry’s] most intense and thrilling novel to date . . . Midnight at Marble Arch is stunning and insightful from start to finish.”—Bookreporter
 
“This book is packed with intrigue.”—The Huffington Post
 
“The monsters Anne Perry creates are not easy to live with, and their actions linger long after the book is closed.”—New York Journal of Books
 
“Engrossing . . . intriguing . . . Perry does a nice job exploring late Victorian attitudes toward sex crimes.”Publishers Weekly

From the Hardcover edition.

The New York Times Book Review - Marilyn Stasio
Without losing her grip on the refined language appropriate to the day, Perry has written a sweeping and scandalous exposé of sexual brutality amid the upper classes…Although the subject is strictly taboo in [Victorian] society, Perry has perfected a delicate touch in approaching the untouchable. Even when dealing with sexual violence, she applies the same nuanced technique that she uses to indicate a woman's age, class and marital status by recording the precise shade of her dress. It's more than a neat trick: it makes readers aware of how the violation of women, those symbols of social stability, can send a modern civilization back to the dark ages.
Publishers Weekly
Sexual violence is at the heart of bestseller Perry’s engrossing 28th Charlotte and Thomas Pitt novel (after 2012’s Dorchester Terrace), set in 1896 London. Pitt, the new head of Special Branch, and his ousted predecessor, Victor Narraway, are about to leave a party when a police officer informs another guest, financier Rawdon Quixwood, that his wife, Catherine, is dead. Pitt and Narraway accompany Quixwood to the financier’s house, where they find the wife’s battered body. After being raped by her assailant—someone she apparently let inside—she drank a fatal dose of laudanum. Later, Angeles Castelbranco, the Portuguese ambassador’s daughter, plunges to her death in an effort to escape the rake who had been tormenting her. Pitt learns that she, too, was the victim of sexual assault. In an intriguing twist, Quixwood provides the alibi for the suspect in that case. Perry does a nice job exploring late Victorian attitudes toward sex crimes. Agent: Donald Maass, Donald Maas Literary Agency. (Apr.)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345536686
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 3/25/2014
  • Series: Thomas and Charlotte Pitt Series , #28
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 43,375
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.97 (h) x 0.73 (d)

Meet the Author

Anne Perry
Anne Perry is the bestselling author of two acclaimed series set in Victorian England: the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt novels, including Dorchester Terrace and Treason at Lisson Grove, and the William Monk novels, including A Sunless Sea and Acceptable Loss. She is also the author of a series of five World War I novels, as well as ten holiday novels, most recently A Christmas Garland, and a historical novel, The Sheen on the Silk, set in the Ottoman Empire. Anne Perry lives in Scotland.

From the Hardcover edition.

Biography

Born in London in October 1938, Anne Perry was plagued with health problems as a young child. So severe were her illnesses that at age eight she was sent to the Bahamas to live with family friends in the hopes that the warmer climate would improve her health. She returned to her family as a young teenager, but sickness and frequent moves had interrupted her formal education to the extent that she was finally forced to leave school altogether. With the encouragement of her supportive parents, she was able to "fill in the gaps" with voracious reading, and her lack of formal schooling has never held her back.

Although Perry held down many jobs—working at various times as a retail clerk, stewardess, limousine dispatcher, and insurance underwriter—the only thing she ever seriously wanted to do in life was to write. (In her '20s, she started putting together the first draft of Tathea, a fantasy that would not see print until 1999.) At the suggestion of her stepfather, she began writing mysteries set in Victorian London; and in 1979, one of her manuscripts was accepted for publication. The book was The Cater Street Hangman, an ingenious crime novel that introduced a clever, extremely untidy police inspector named Thomas Pitt. In this way an intriguing mystery series was born…along with a successful writing career.

In addition to the Thomas and Charlotte Pitt novels, Perry crafts darker, more layered Victorian mysteries around the character of London police detective William Monk, whose memory has been impaired by a coach accident. (Monk debuted in 1990's The Face of a Stranger.) She also writes historical novels set during the First World War (No Graves as Yet, Shoulder the Sky, etc.) and holiday-themed mysteries (A Christmas Journey, A Christmas Secret, etc), and her short stories have been included in several anthologies.

Good To Know

Some fun and fascinating outtakes from our interview with Anne Perry:

The first time I made any money telling a story I was four and a half years old—golden hair, blue eyes, a pink smocked dress, and neat little socks and shoes. I walked home from school (it was safe then) with my lunchtime sixpence unspent. A large boy, perhaps 12 or 13, stopped me. He was carrying a stick and threatened to hit me if I didn't give him my sixpence. I told him a long, sad story about how poor we were—no food at home, not even enough money for shoes! He gave me his half crown—five times sixpence! It's appalling! I didn't think of it as lying, just escaping with my sixpence. How on earth he could have believed me I have no idea. Perhaps that is the knack of a good story—let your imagination go wild, pile on the emotions—believe it yourself, evidence to the contrary be damned. I am not really proud of that particular example!

I used to live next door to people who had a tame dove. They had rescued it when it broke its wing. The wing healed, but it never learned to fly again. I used to walk a mile or so around the village with the dove. Its little legs were only an inch or two long, so it got tired, then it would ride on my head. Naturally I talked to it. It was a very nice bird. I got some funny looks. Strangers even asked me if I knew there was a bird on my head! Who the heck did they think I was talking to? Of course I knew there was a bird on my head. I'm not stupid—just a writer, and entitled to be a little different. I'm also English, so that gives me a second excuse!

On the other hand I'm not totally scatty. I like maths, and I used to love quadratic equations. One of the most exciting things that happened to me was when someone explained non-Euclidean geometry to me, and I suddenly saw the infinite possibilities in lateral thinking! How could I have been so blind before?

Here are some things I like—and one thing I don't:

  • I love wild places, beech trees, bluebell woods, light on water—whether the light is sunlight, moonlight, or lamplight; and whether the water is ocean, rain, snow, river, mist, or even a puddle.

  • I love the setting sun in autumn over the cornstooks.

  • I love to eat raspberries, pink grapefruit, crusty bread dipped in olive oil.

  • I love gardens where you seem to walk from "room to room," with rambling roses and vines climbing into the trees and sudden vistas when you turn corners.

  • I love white swans and the wild geese flying overhead.

  • I dislike rigidity, prejudice, ill-temper, and perhaps above all, self-righteousness.

  • I love laughter, mercy, courage, hope. I think that probably makes me pretty much like most people. But that isn't bad.
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      1. Also Known As:
        Juliet Hulme
      2. Hometown:
        Portmahomack, Ross-shire, U.K
      1. Date of Birth:
        October 28, 1938
      2. Place of Birth:
        Blackheath, London England

    Read an Excerpt

    chapter

    1

    Pitt stood at the top of the stairs and looked across the glittering ballroom of the Spanish Embassy in the heart of London. The light from the chandeliers sparkled on necklaces, bracelets, and earrings. Between the somber black and white suits of the men, the women’s gowns blossomed in every color of the early summer: delicate pastels for the young, burning pinks and golds for those in the height of their beauty, and wines, mulberries, and lavenders for the more advanced.

    Beside him was Charlotte, her hand resting lightly on his arm. She had no diamonds to wear, but he knew that she had long ago ceased to mind that. It was 1896 and she was now forty years old. The flush of youth had gone, but the richness of maturity became her even more. The happiness that glowed in her face was lovelier than flawless skin or sculpted features, which were mere gifts of chance.

    Her hand tightened on his arm for a moment as they started down the stairs. Then they moved into the throng of people, smiling, acknowledging this one and that, trying to remember names. Pitt had recently been promoted to head of Britain’s Special Branch, and it was a heavier weight of responsibility than he had ever carried before. There was no one senior to him in whom he could confide, or to whom he could defer a difficult decision.

    He spoke now to ministers, ambassadors, people of influence far greater than their casual laughter in this room might suggest. Pitt had been born in the most modest of circumstances, and gatherings like this were still not easy for him. As a policeman, he had entered homes through the kitchen door, like any other servant, whereas now he was socially acceptable because of the power his position gave him and because he was privy to a range of secrets about almost everyone in the room.

    Beside him Charlotte moved easily, and he watched her grace with pleasure. She had been born into Society and knew its foibles and its weaknesses, even if she was too disastrously candid to steer her way through them, unless it was absolutely necessary, as it was now.

    She murmured some polite comment to the woman next to her, trying to look interested in the reply. Then she allowed herself to be introduced to Isaura Castelbranco, the wife of the Portuguese Ambassador to Britain.

    “How do you do, Mrs. Pitt?” Isaura replied with warmth. She was a shorter woman than Charlotte, barely of average height, but the dignity of her bearing made her stand apart from the ordinary. Her features were gentle, almost vulnerable, and her eyes were so dark as to seem black against her pale skin.

    “I hope you are finding our summer weather agreeable?” Charlotte remarked, for the sake of something to say. No one cared about the subject: it was the tone of voice, the smile in the eyes, that mattered.

    “It is very pleasant not to be too hot,” Isaura answered immediately. “I am looking forward to the Regatta. It is at Henley, I believe?”

    “Indeed it is,” Charlotte agreed. “I admit, I haven’t been for years, but I would love to do so again.”

    Pitt knew that was not really true. Charlotte found the chatter and the pretentiousness of lavish Society events a little tedious, but he could see in her face that she liked this woman with her quiet manner.

    They spoke for several minutes more before courtesy required that they offer their attention to the others who swirled around under the lights, or drifted to the various side rooms, or down the stairs to the hallway below.

    They separated with a smile as Pitt was drawn into conversation with a junior minister from the Foreign Office. Charlotte managed to catch the attention of her great-aunt, Lady Vespasia Cumming-Gould. Actually she was great-aunt by marriage to Charlotte’s sister Emily, but over the years that distinction had ceased even to be remembered, let alone matter.

    “You seem to be enjoying yourself,” Vespasia said softly, amusement lighting her remarkable silver-gray eyes. In her prime she had reputedly been the most beautiful woman in Europe, certainly the wittiest. Did they but know it, she was also one who had fought at the barricades in Rome, during the turbulent revolution that had swept Europe in ’48.

    “I haven’t forgotten all my manners,” Charlotte replied with her usual frankness. “I fear I am reaching an age when I cannot afford to wear an expression of boredom. It is terribly unflattering.”

    Vespasia was quite openly amused, her smile warm. “It never does to look as if you are waiting for something,” she agreed. “Which is good. Women who are waiting are so tiresome. Who have you met?”

    “The wife of the Portuguese ambassador,” Charlotte replied. “I liked her immediately. There is something unusual in her face. I’m sorry I shall probably never see her again.”

    “Isaura Castelbranco,” Vespasia said thoughtfully. “I know little of her, thank heaven. I know too much about so many other people. A little mystery lends such charm, like the softness of the late afternoon or the silence between the notes of music.”

    Charlotte was turning the thought over in her mind before replying when there was a sudden commotion a dozen yards away from them. Like those around her, she turned toward it. A very elegant young man with a sweep of fair hair took a step backward, raising his hands defensively, a look of disbelief on his face.

    In front of him a girl in a gown of white lace stood alone, the skin of her bosom, neck and cheeks flushed red. She was very young, perhaps no more than sixteen, but of a Mediterranean darkness, and already the woman she would become was clear in the curves of her body.

    Everyone around the two fell silent, either in embarrassment or possibly out of confusion, as if they had little idea what was happening.

    “Really, you are quite unreasonable,” the young man said defensively, his voice light, trying to brush off the incident. “You misunderstood me.”

    The girl was not soothed at all. She looked angry, even a little frightened.

    “No, sir,” she said in slightly accented English. “I did not misunderstand. Some things are the same in all languages.”

    He still did not seem to be perturbed, only elaborately patient, as with someone who was being unintentionally obtuse. “I assure you, I meant it merely as a compliment. You must be used to such things?”

    She drew in her breath to answer, but obviously could not find the words she wished.

    He smiled, now openly amused at her, perhaps just a little mocking. He was good-looking in an unusual way. He had a strong and prominent nose and thin lips, but fine dark eyes.

    “You’ll have to get used to admiration.” His look swept up and down her with just a fraction too much candor. “You’ll receive a great deal of it, I can promise you.”

    The girl was shaking now. Even from where she stood, Charlotte could see that she had no idea how to deal with such inappropriate appreciation of her beauty. She was too young to have learned the necessary composure. It seemed her mother was not close enough to have overheard the exchange, and the young man, whom she now recognized as Neville Forsbrook, was very confident. His father was one of London’s foremost bankers and the family had wealth and status, and all the privilege that came with it. He was not used to being denied anything, most especially by a girl who was not even British.

    Charlotte took a step forward, and felt Vespasia’s hand on her arm, restraining her.

    The color had drained out of the girl’s face, leaving her ashen. “Leave me alone!” Her voice was shrill and a little too loud. “Don’t touch me!”

    Neville Forsbrook laughed quite openly now. “My dear young lady, you are being ridiculous, and making something of a spectacle of yourself. I’m sure that is not what you wish.” He was smiling, and he took a step toward her, one hand out in front of him, as if to soothe.

    The girl swung her hand wildly in an arc, catching his arm with hers and knocking it aside roughly. She swiveled around to escape, lost her balance and almost fell against another young woman, who promptly screamed and flung herself into the arms of a startled young man close to her.

    The girl managed to untangle herself and fled, sobbing now. Neville Forsbrook remained where he was with a half smile on his face, which quickly changed to a look of bewilderment. He shrugged and spread his hands, elegant and strong, but the shadow of a smile remained. Was it out of embarrassment, or was there still the faintest hint of mockery there? Charlotte wasn’t sure.

    Someone stepped forward and began a polite conversation about nothing in particular. Others joined in gratefully. After a few moments the hum of voices resumed, the rustle of skirts, distant music, the slight sound of feet moving on the polished floor. It was as if nothing had happened.

    “That was very ugly,” Charlotte said to Vespasia as soon as she was certain they were not overheard. “What an insensitive young man.”

    “He must feel foolish,” Vespasia replied with a touch of sympathy.

    “What on earth was that all about?” a dark-haired woman near them asked confusedly.

    The elderly man with her shook his head. “Young ladies tend to be rather excitable, my dear. I wouldn’t worry about it. It’s just some misunderstanding, no doubt.”

    “Who is she, anyway?” the woman asked him, glancing at Charlotte also, in case she could shed light on it.

    “Angeles Castelbranco. Pretty young thing,” the elderly man remarked, not really to anyone. “Going to be a beautiful woman.”

    “That’s hardly relevant, James!” his wife snapped. “She doesn’t know how to behave! Imagine her doing that at a dinner party!”

    “Quite bad enough here, thank you,” another woman joined in. The brilliance of her diamonds and the sheen on her lush green silks could not disguise the bitterness of her expression.

    Charlotte was stung to the girl’s defense. “I’m sure you are right,” she said, meeting the woman’s eyes boldly. “You must know far more about it than we do. All we saw was what appeared to be a rather self-assured young man quite clearly embarrassing a foreign ambassador’s daughter. I have no idea what preceded it, or how it might more kindly have been handled.”

    Charlotte felt Vespasia’s hand fall very lightly on her arm again, but she ignored it. She kept the fixed, inquiring smile on her face and did not lower her gaze.

    The woman in green colored angrily. “You give me too much credit, Mrs. . . . I’m afraid I do not know your name . . .” She left the denial hanging in the air, not so much a question as a dismissal. “But of course I am well acquainted with Sir Pelham Forsbrook, and therefore his son, Neville, who has been kind enough to show a very flattering interest in my youngest daughter.”

    Pitt now rejoined them with a glance at Vespasia, but Charlotte did not introduce either him or herself to the woman in green. “Let us hope it is more graciously expressed than his unflattering interest in Miss Castelbranco,” she continued in a tone so sweet as to be sickly. “But of course you will make sure of that. You are not in a foreign country and uncertain how to deal with ambiguous remarks from young men directed toward your daughter.”

    “I do not know any young men who make ambiguous remarks!” the woman snapped back, her eyebrows arched high.

    “How pleasant for you,” Charlotte murmured.

    The elderly man coughed, and raised his handkerchief to conceal his mouth, his eyes dancing.

    Pitt turned his head away as if he had heard some sudden noise to attract his attention, and accidentally pulled Charlotte with him, although in truth she was perfectly ready to leave. That had been her parting shot. From here on it could only get worse. She gave a dazzling smile to Vespasia, and saw an answering sparkle in her eyes.

    “What on earth are you doing?” Pitt demanded softly as soon as they were out of earshot.

    “Telling her she’s a fool,” Charlotte replied. She had thought her meaning was obvious.

    “I know that!” he retorted. “And so does she. You have just made an enemy.”

    “I’m sorry,” she apologized. “That may be unfortunate, but being her friend would have been even more so. She’s a social climber of the worst sort.”

    “How do you know? Who is she?” he asked.

    “I know because I’ve just seen how she acts. And I have no idea who she is, nor do I care.” She knew she might regret saying that, but just at the moment she was too angry to curb her temper. “I am going to speak to Senhora Castelbranco and make sure her daughter is all right.”

    “Charlotte . . .”

    She broke free, turned for a moment and gave him the same dazzling smile she had offered Vespasia, then moved into the crowd toward where she had last seen the Portuguese ambassador’s wife.

    It took her ten minutes more to find her. Senhora Castelbranco was standing near one of the doorways, her daughter with her. The girl was the same height as her mother, and even prettier than she had appeared at a distance. Her eyes were dazzling, and her skin softly honey-colored with a faint flush across her cheeks. She watched Charlotte approach them with an alarm that she could not hide, even though she was clearly trying to.

    Charlotte smiled at her briefly, then turned to her mother. “I’m so sorry that wretched young man was rude. It must be impossibly difficult for you to do anything, in your diplomatic position. It really was inexcusable of him.” She turned to the girl, then realized she was uncertain how fluent her English might be. “I hope you are all right?” she said a little awkwardly. “I apologize. We should have made sure you were not placed in such an ugly situation.”

    Angeles smiled, but her eyes filled with tears. “Oh, I am quite all right, madam, I assure you. I . . . I am not hurt. I . . .” She gulped. “I just did not know how to answer him.”

    Isaura put a protective arm around her daughter’s shoulder. “She is well, of course. Just a little embarrassed. In our own language she would’ve known what to say.” She gave a little shrug. “In English one is not always sure if one is being amusing, or perhaps insulting. It is better not to speak than risk saying something one cannot later withdraw.”

    “Of course,” Charlotte said, although she felt uneasy. It seemed like Angeles had actually been far more distressed than they were admitting. “The more awkward the situation, the harder it is to find the words in another language,” she agreed. “That is why he should have known better than to behave as he did. I am so sorry.”

    Isaura smiled at her, her dark eyes unreadable. “You are very kind, but I assure you there is no harm done beyond a few moments’ unpleasantness. That is unavoidable in life. It happens to all of us at some time or another. The Season is full of events. I hope we will meet again.”

    It was gracious, but it was also a dismissal, as if they wished to be left alone for a while, perhaps even to leave.

    “I hope so too,” Charlotte agreed, and excused herself. Her feeling of unease was, if anything, greater.

    As she returned to where she had left Pitt, she passed several groups of people talking. One of half a dozen included the woman in green, of whom she had undoubtedly made an enemy.

    “Very excitable temperament,” she was saying. “Unreliable, I’m afraid. But we have no choice except to deal with them, I suppose.”

    “No choice at all, so my husband informs me,” another assured her. “It seems we have a treaty with Portugal that is over five hundred years old, and for some reason or another, we consider it important.”

    “One of the great colonial powers, I’m told,” a third woman said with a lift of her fair eyebrows, as if the fact was scarcely credible. “I thought it was just a rather agreeable little country off the west side of Spain.” She gave a tinkling laugh.

    Charlotte was unreasonably irritated, given that she knew very little more of Portuguese colonial history than the woman who had spoken.

    “Frankly, my dear, I think she had possibly taken rather too much wine and was the worse for it,” the woman in green said confidentially. “When I was sixteen we never drank more than lemonade.”

    The second woman leaned forward conspiratorially. “And too young to be engaged, don’t you think?”

    “She is engaged? Good heavens, yes.” Her voice was emphatic. “Should wait another year, at the very least. She is far too immature, as she has just most unfortunately demonstrated. To whom is she engaged?”

    “That’s the thing,” the third woman said, shrugging elegantly. “Very good marriage, I believe. Tiago de Freitas. Excellent family. Enormous amount of money, I think from Brazil. Could it be Brazil?”

    “Well, there’s gold there, and Brazil is Portuguese,” a fourth woman told them, smoothing the silk of her skirt. “So it could well be so. And Angola in the southwest of Africa is Portuguese, and so is Mozambique in southeast Africa, and they say there’s gold there too.”

    “Then how did we come to let the Portuguese have it?” the woman in green asked irritably. “Somebody wasn’t paying attention!”

    “Perhaps they’ve quarreled?” one of them suggested.

    “Who? The Portuguese?” the woman in green demanded. “Or do you mean the Africans?”

    “I meant Angeles Castelbranco and Tiago de Freitas” came the impatient reply. “That would account for her being a bit hysterical.”

    “It doesn’t excuse bad manners,” the woman in green said sharply, lifting her rather pronounced chin, and thereby making more of the diamonds at her throat. “If one is indisposed, one should say so and remain at home.”

    At that rate, you should never set foot out of the door, Charlotte thought bitterly. And we should all be the happier for it. But she could not say so. She was an eavesdropper, not part of the conversation. She moved on quickly before they became aware that she had been standing in the same spot for several moments, for no apparent reason except to overhear.

    She found Pitt speaking with a group of people she didn’t know. In case it might be important, she did not interrupt. When there was a break in the discussion, he excused himself temporarily and came over to her.

    “Did you find the ambassador’s wife?” he asked, his brow slightly furrowed with concern.

    “Yes,” she said quietly. “Thomas, I’m afraid she’s still very upset. It was a miserable thing to do to a young girl from a foreign country. At the very least, he made public fun of her. She’s only sixteen, just two years older than Jemima.” In the moment of saying her own daughter’s name she felt a tug of fear, conscious of how terribly vulnerable Jemima was. She was partway between child and woman, her body seeming to change every week, to leave behind the comfort of girlhood but not yet gain the grace and confidence of an adult.

    Pitt looked startled. Clearly he had not even imagined Jemima in a ball gown with her hair coiled up on her head and young men seeing so much more than the child she was.

    Charlotte smiled at him. “You should look more carefully, Thomas. Jemima’s still a little self-conscious, but she has curves, and more than one young man has looked at her a second and third time—including her dance teacher and the rector’s son.”

    Pitt stiffened.

    She put her hand on his arm, gently. “There’s no need to be alarmed. I’m watching. She’s still two years younger than Angeles Castelbranco, and at this age two years is a lot. But she’s full of moods. One minute she’s so happy she can’t stop singing, an hour later she’s in tears or has lost her temper. She quarrels with poor Daniel, who doesn’t know what’s the matter with her, and then she’s so reticent she doesn’t want to come out of her bedroom.”

    “I had noticed,” Pitt said drily. “Are you sure it’s normal?”

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    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 32 Customer Reviews
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 23, 2013

      Whoops

      As usual I was excited to see another book in the Thomas and Charlotte Pitt series. However, this book was more of a "soapbox" novel about the horrors and helplessness of rape. There really wasn't a lot of story to this one and not a lot of the details and characterization that have made the Pitt series so wonderful. Not really a book to curl up on a rainy day and lose yourself in; maybe next time :0(

      7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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    • Posted April 9, 2013

      The Pitts tackle the most heinous of crimes. I feel as if Perry

      The Pitts tackle the most heinous of crimes. I feel as if Perry was trying to make a great big statement with this book. Tackling the issue of rape in that era and the upper echelons reaction to it. The theme was relevant for that era but the points and arguments had a 21st century ring to them. That could mean two things. Either we as a society have not moved one inch in our thinking and approach to the issue in the last few centuries or Perry forgot which era she was writing in.
      It was quite evident how much the author wanted to point out her stance on the matter. How the victims are/were treated as the guilty party and rejected for being raped. Blamed by other females for bringing it upon themselves, being bad women hence deserved it or making the man forget himself. All of those stereotypical answers can still be heard today. Women of that era couldn't accuse or come forward it would mean embarrassing their family and bringing shame upon their own person.
      I think getting the point across was more important than concentrating on the usual Pitt type murder mystery. It overshadowed the sub-plots.
      It wasn't the usual comfortable Perry style mystery. This was Perry finding her voice and shouting above the noise.
      I received a copy of this book via NetGalley.

      6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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    • Posted May 17, 2013

      Charlotte and Thomas Pitt continue to be among the most engaging

      Charlotte and Thomas Pitt continue to be among the most engaging of fictional sleuths, but Anne Perry has become more ponderous and preachey with the passage of time. Surely readers don't need quite so many iterations of the helplessness and rage that afflict the principal characters, or of the frustrating explanatory scenarios that they propose. There just isn't enough action to sustain the 337 pages of well-written but repetitive prose.

      3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted May 3, 2013

      Highly recommend

      I have been an Anne Perry fan for many years and look forward to new episodes of the Pitts.

      2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted June 23, 2013

      fabulous!

      As good as all of the others; couldn't put it down

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Posted June 8, 2013

      I am a big fan of this series. Another reviewer wondered if the

      I am a big fan of this series. Another reviewer wondered if the book contained some anachronisms or if we have not moved very far when is come to the question of rape. Unfortunately, I think it is that we haven't come very far. This is a great addition to the series.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted May 17, 2013

      Highly Recommended

      Ann Perry has done her usual superb job with this one. She never disappoints anyone who is a lover of History and a lover of an excellent Mystery. Ms. Perry is a master of both. I highly recommend this book and all of her other books in any of her several series and other stand alone books.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted May 7, 2013

      great!!!

      reading & enjoying this book right now. would highly recommend it.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Posted May 3, 2013

      Ms Perry always delivers!

      Enjoyed it so much. Now awaiting the next one.

      1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    • Posted May 3, 2013

      Recommended

      Anne Perry is always a joy to read - historical information and background is an added plus - I so enjoy the deveolpment of the characters from book to book- She is consistent with the human development three dimenisional characters- Difficult subject - yet written so well

      1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted April 12, 2014

      Compassion to Wildfire

      Hi, I'm Compassion, and I noticed Love hasn't been rping. So, if you're still on, I'd like to take over for Love. Is that ok?

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted March 31, 2014

      Anne Perry has written another Charlotte and Thomas Pitt winning

      Anne Perry has written another Charlotte and Thomas Pitt winning novel. Finally Thomas takes charge as the Commander of the Special Branch. In this story Thomas and Victor Narraway ,the former Commander investigate two different rapes of girls and high society women. Vespasia and Charlotte discuss the crimes in a way that would be done today.
      Can't wait to read the next one. Thanks Net Galley and Ballantine books.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted December 13, 2013

      it just ended.

      Did the author miss her deadline? the book just ends. yes everything gets tied up, but too quickly and there's no closure for some stories.

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    • Posted December 10, 2013

      Only ok

      The Thomas and Charlotte Pitt stories are getting more violent and somewhat repetitive. I would save my money.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted August 14, 2013

      Kenzie

      Sat.

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted August 8, 2013

      add to your collection--yet another Charlotte & Thomas Pitt delight

      Charlotte is at her best is assisting Thomas with this mystery of who is having an affair with whom and the consequences that follow.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted June 6, 2013

      To all

      Roleplay more kits at white result 3

      0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted June 6, 2013

      May i rp

      Infinityheart?

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted June 9, 2013

      Fawnlight

      Fawnlight stretches and yawns, rolling onto her back.

      0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted June 6, 2013

      Can I rp

      Velvetpelt or Infinityheart? What gender is Infinityheart

      0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 32 Customer Reviews

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