Midnight in Mexico: A Reporter's Journey Through a Country's Descent into Darkness

Midnight in Mexico: A Reporter's Journey Through a Country's Descent into Darkness

4.1 9
by Alfredo Corchado
     
 

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"a solid and substantive work on the compassionate way. "  See more details below

Overview

"a solid and substantive work on the compassionate way. "

Editorial Reviews

Washington Post - Marie Arana
Electrifying… Corchado documents his own race against time with white-knuckle alarm. Searching for clues about the death threat against him, he gives readers an intimate sense of the murky alliances: the drug thugs who lunch with U.S. government officials, the cheeky prostitute who holds more valuable information than any high-level bureaucrat, the broadcast journalist who can't tear herself away from the gore.
Dallas Morning News - Alan Cheuse
Fascinating… a passionate amalgam of personal history, national history and reportage. Corchado looks at Mexico's darkest hour. And doesn't blink.
From the Publisher
Praise for Alfredo Corchado’s Midnight in Mexico:
 
"Electrifying… the portrait that Corcahdo paints is all the more heartrending for Mexico's extraordinary promise... Security and the drug war that are Mexico's biggest worries… watching Corchado struggle in the crucible, trying to do the right thing by his two homelands, one can't help being reminded… the dawn that will follow this 'midnight in Mexico' will come only if we take some of the responsibility. The health of this neighbor is integral to our own."
Washington Post
 
"Corchado looks at Mexico's darkest hour. And doesn't blink."
—Alan Cheuse, Dallas Morning News
 
"A riveting account that features many of the places and personalities that have been central to Mexico's recent nightmare…Corchado is a dogged and savvy journalist who manages to be everywhere a good reported should be… A unique binational perspective on the two countries he calls home, expressing admiration for the determination of U.S. and Mexican officials to fight a shared problem by taking on shared responsibility."
—San Francisco Chronicle
 
"[Corchado's] solid research and detailed understanding of the forces at work there make the book an important one for anyone who cares about Mexico, and his personal struggle with his homeland make it a raw, compelling read."
Miami Herald
 
"The secret revealed at [Midnight in Mexico's] conclusion is more compelling than Citizen Kane’s 'Rosebud'… I won’t spoil the ending here, but you will shiver when you get there, and you may even weep. Either way, you will understand Corchado’s need to stay in Mexico and his need to bring us stories that we need to read."
Texas Observer
 
"An excellent, first-hand description of what a journalist must endure to report critically on Mexico."
El Paso Times
 
 
 "Having lived and reported through four presidencies… His own story is emblematic… People are willing to do anything about Latin America other than read about it, or so it's been said. This is one book about Latin America that merits attention."
Kirkus
 
"This book is about the blood-drenched borderlands that divide Alfredo Corchado's two countries, Mexico and the United States, which still dominate his own life. Told against the backdrop of the horrifically violent drug wars that have turned much of Mexico into a charnel land, Corchado shares his own story and that of his family with a moving degree of honesty and acuity. Corchado's love for his immigrant family and pride in what they have achieved is palpable, yet weighted down by a sense of what they, and Mexico, may have lost forever in the exchange. In many ways, Midnight in Mexico stands as a raw, real-life parable for the paradoxes of the Mexican-American experience, and it is both a riveting and gut-wrenching read."
—Jon Lee Anderson, author of Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life and The Fall of Baghdad
 
"Midnight in Mexico is the story of a journalist's dangerous and notable efforts to report on Mexico's horrible drug wars. The book brings a special clarity, the clarity of the personal and particular, to a very important and confusing subject, and it is in itself an absorbing story, marked by careful attention to fact and also by the author's deep love for his homeland. Mr. Corchado is the kind of reporter and writer who revives one's faith in journalism."
Tracy Kidder, Pulitzer Prize winning author of Strength in What Remains
 
"Anyone who wants to learn about Mexico on the inside, especially how the United States affects it, illegally and legally, will learn much from this sharply perceptive and moving account."
John Womack Jr., Robert Woods Bliss Professor of Latin American History and Economics, Harvard University
 
"Alfredo Corchado is the top American journalist covering Mexico today. His life embodies the complex blending of the U.S. and Mexico. Corchado’s knowledge of the Mexican political system, the drug trade, and modern Mexican society is non-pareil."
Howard Campbell, author of Drug War Zone
 
"One of the keenest observers of Mexico today, Corchado tells his story of Mexico, of the hope of its democratic opening, of the often despair at its violence, and of its ever closer ties with his other country, the United States."
Shannon K. O’Neill, Senior Fellow for Latin American Studies, Council on Foreign Relations
 
"Anyone interested in what is happening and has happened in Mexico for the past six years must read this book. We can call what is happening in Mexico a “drug war” but that phrase cheapens the politics and the economics that govern the relationship between the United States and Mexico. I believe Midnight in Mexico will become one of the most necessary books about the Mexican-American experience in this country. More than a journalist, Alfredo Corchado is the real thing, a voice that represents millions of people."
Benjamin Alire Saenz, American Book Award winning author of Calendar of Dust
 
 
 
Kirkus Reviews
Mexico-born U.S. journalist Corchado frames a portrait of a torn nation within an account of escaping his own murder. "By the time this book is published," writes Dallas Morning News Mexico bureau chief Corchado, "nearly ninety thousand people will have been killed or disappeared since President Calderón launched a war on the cartels." Any number of people might have wanted him among them: the Zetas, enforcers for a Mexican drug lord who became drug lords themselves; lesser drug lords; corrupt officials within the military or government. As he writes, on receiving the death threat, "I scanned my recent work…looking for the story that could have pissed them off--whoever they were." Having lived and reported through four presidencies (a Mexican president serves a single six-year term), Corchado was well-placed to gauge the seriousness of the threat--and, having gauged it, wise to head back to El Norte, the cause of so many of Mexico's woes. His own story is emblematic, to be sure, but also common enough: After all, hundreds of young people lie dead in Ciudad Juárez because of the psychopathy attendant in the drug trade. More interesting than his personal travails are the author's reflections on a Mexico that is malformed and crime-stricken largely due to American influences, unintended perhaps but real nonetheless, the drug cartels having filled an economic and political vacuum produced by neoliberal free trade. In fact, the cartels are perfect examples of free trade, with one drug lord standing on "the Forbes list of the world's billionaires." Corchado is short on prescription but long on description, especially of the disastrous policies of the George W. Bush administration, some of which helped flood Mexico with automatic weapons. People are willing to do anything about Latin America other than read about it, or so it's been said. This is one book about Latin America that merits attention.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101617830
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/30/2013
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
121,171
File size:
1 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

Benjamin Alire Sáenz
Anyone interested in what is happening and has happened in Mexico for the past six years must read this book. We can call what is happening in Mexico a “drug war” but that phrase cheapens the politics and the economics that govern the relationship between the United States and Mexico. I believe Midnight in Mexico will become one of the most necessary books about the Mexican-American experience in this country. More than a journalist, Alfredo Corchado is the real thing, a voice that represents millions of people.
—Benjamin Alire Saenz, American Book Award winning author of Calendar of Dust
John Womack Jr.

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Shannon O'Neill
One of the keenest observers of Mexico today, Corchado tells his story of Mexico, of the hope of its democratic opening, of the often despair at its violence, and of its ever closer ties with his other country, the United States.
—Shannon K. O'Neill, Senior Fellow for Latin American Studies, Council on Foreign Relations
Tracy Kidder
Midnight in Mexico is the story of a journalist's dangerous and notable efforts to report on Mexico's horrible drug wars. The book brings a special clarity, the clarity of the personal and particular, to a very important and confusing subject, and it is in itself an absorbing story, marked by careful attention to fact and also by the author's deep love for his homeland. Mr. Corchado is the kind of reporter and writer who revives one's faith in journalism.
—Tracy Kidder, Pulitzer Prize winning author of Strength in What Remains
From the Publisher
Praise for Alfredo Corchado’s Midnight in Mexico:
 
"Electrifying… the portrait that Corcahdo paints is all the more heartrending for Mexico's extraordinary promise... Security and the drug war that are Mexico's biggest worries… watching Corchado struggle in the crucible, trying to do the right thing by his two homelands, one can't help being reminded… the dawn that will follow this 'midnight in Mexico' will come only if we take some of the responsibility. The health of this neighbor is integral to our own."
—Washington Post
 
"Corchado looks at Mexico's darkest hour. And doesn't blink."
Alan Cheuse, Dallas Morning News
 
"A riveting account that features many of the places and personalities that have been central to Mexico's recent nightmare…Corchado is a dogged and savvy journalist who manages to be everywhere a good reported should be… A unique binational perspective on the two countries he calls home, expressing admiration for the determination of U.S. and Mexican officials to fight a shared problem by taking on shared responsibility."
—San Francisco Chronicle
 
"[Corchado's] solid research and detailed understanding of the forces at work there make the book an important one for anyone who cares about Mexico, and his personal struggle with his homeland make it a raw, compelling read."
—Miami Herald
 
"The secret revealed at [Midnight in Mexico's] conclusion is more compelling than Citizen Kane’s 'Rosebud'… I won’t spoil the ending here, but you will shiver when you get there, and you may even weep. Either way, you will understand Corchado’s need to stay in Mexico and his need to bring us stories that we need to read."
—Texas Observer
 
"An excellent, first-hand description of what a journalist must endure to report critically on Mexico."
—El Paso Times
 
 
 "Having lived and reported through four presidencies… His own story is emblematic… People are willing to do anything about Latin America other than read about it, or so it's been said. This is one book about Latin America that merits attention."
—Kirkus
 
"This book is about the blood-drenched borderlands that divide Alfredo Corchado's two countries, Mexico and the United States, which still dominate his own life. Told against the backdrop of the horrifically violent drug wars that have turned much of Mexico into a charnel land, Corchado shares his own story and that of his family with a moving degree of honesty and acuity. Corchado's love for his immigrant family and pride in what they have achieved is palpable, yet weighted down by a sense of what they, and Mexico, may have lost forever in the exchange. In many ways, Midnight in Mexico stands as a raw, real-life parable for the paradoxes of the Mexican-American experience, and it is both a riveting and gut-wrenching read."
—Jon Lee Anderson, author of Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life and The Fall of Baghdad
 
"Midnight in Mexico is the story of a journalist's dangerous and notable efforts to report on Mexico's horrible drug wars. The book brings a special clarity, the clarity of the personal and particular, to a very important and confusing subject, and it is in itself an absorbing story, marked by careful attention to fact and also by the author's deep love for his homeland. Mr. Corchado is the kind of reporter and writer who revives one's faith in journalism."
Tracy Kidder, Pulitzer Prize winning author of Strength in What Remains
 
"Anyone who wants to learn about Mexico on the inside, especially how the United States affects it, illegally and legally, will learn much from this sharply perceptive and moving account."
John Womack Jr., Robert Woods Bliss Professor of Latin American History and Economics, Harvard University
 
"Alfredo Corchado is the top American journalist covering Mexico today. His life embodies the complex blending of the U.S. and Mexico. Corchado’s knowledge of the Mexican political system, the drug trade, and modern Mexican society is non-pareil."
Howard Campbell, author of Drug War Zone
 
"One of the keenest observers of Mexico today, Corchado tells his story of Mexico, of the hope of its democratic opening, of the often despair at its violence, and of its ever closer ties with his other country, the United States."
Shannon K. O’Neill, Senior Fellow for Latin American Studies, Council on Foreign Relations
 
"Anyone interested in what is happening and has happened in Mexico for the past six years must read this book. We can call what is happening in Mexico a “drug war” but that phrase cheapens the politics and the economics that govern the relationship between the United States and Mexico. I believe Midnight in Mexico will become one of the most necessary books about the Mexican-American experience in this country. More than a journalist, Alfredo Corchado is the real thing, a voice that represents millions of people."
Benjamin Alire Saenz, American Book Award winning author of Calendar of Dust
 
 
 
 
Howard Campbell
Alfredo Corchado is the top American journalist covering Mexico today. His life embodies the complex blending of the U.S. and Mexico. Corchado's knowledge of the Mexican political system, the drug trade, and modern Mexican society is non-pareil.
—Howard Campbell, author of Drug War Zone

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Meet the Author

Alfredo Corchado is a Nieman, Woodrow Wilson, and Rockefeller fellow and the Mexico bureau chief of the Dallas Morning News. In 2000, he was the first reporter granted an interview with then newly-elected president Vicente Fox. He lives in Mexico City.

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