Mig Alley: The fight for air superiority

Mig Alley: The fight for air superiority

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by William Y'Blood
     
 

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The fight for air superiority began the day the Korean War started and only ended with the armistice three years later. Once the shock of the North Koreans’ invasion wore off, it did not take long for the United States Air Force, assisted by other United Nations air forces, to destroy the North Korean Air Force. The arrival of the MiG–15 in November 1950

Overview

The fight for air superiority began the day the Korean War started and only ended with the armistice three years later. Once the shock of the North Koreans’ invasion wore off, it did not take long for the United States Air Force, assisted by other United Nations air forces, to destroy the North Korean Air Force. The arrival of the MiG–15 in November 1950, often flown by Soviet pilots, changed things considerably however. For the remainder of the war, bitterly contested air battles were fought almost daily. Yet despite a decided numerical superiority in jet fighters, the Communists were never able to gain air superiority, testament to the skill and training of the UN fighter pilots, primarily those U.S. Air Force airmen flying the magnificent F–86 Sabre.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013974593
Publisher:
Historical Studies
Publication date:
01/01/2000
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
53
Sales rank:
113,375
File size:
1 MB

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Mig Alley: The fight for air superiority 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Skeeter21 More than 1 year ago
I got this book because I flew jets in Korea in the 80's and am very interested in the air combat that took place during the Korean War. Although this book, at times, reads like a college textbook, I found it to be very interesting and informative. If you get this book, I would suggest you have a map of the Korean peninsula handy for reference (unless you've been there and know where all these places are). You will be amazed at the overwhelming odds against the U.N. pilots had to overcome. If you're a fighter jock (like me) or a history buff, this book is for you. If you want to read a book on the specifics of being a fighter jock at the time, I'd suggest, "The Hunters," by James Salter, who flew Sabres during the war.