Migrating Legacy Systems: Gateways, Interfaces and the Incremental Approach

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Overview

Many businesses are burdened by legacy ISs--existing systems that contain valuable data but lack the power or the agility to meet current organizational requirements. Since such systems are by nature resistant to modification, the only way an enterprise can gain full use of the data within one is to move to a completely new IS--ideally, one that won't become a legacy itself in a few years. This book discusses the challenges and provides a framework for a workable system migration, based on incremental modifications that allow the manager to control cost and risk. Focusing on data migration, the authors outline key techniques for transforming a legacy IS into a flexible system that meets current needs and is adaptable to unpredictable future changes.

Because designing, developing, testing, and deploying a new system all at once would be extremely risky, the authors advocate a step-by-step strategy that migrates the system to a decomposable target environment while the current IS remains completely operational. Their flexible 11-step method allows any IS to be migrated incrementally, using gateways to access data reliably and accurately without any downtime.

Because each company's IS is as unique as its business strategy, the authors focus on the choices and pitfalls that may be encountered in an IS migration. Drawing on over 45 years of collective IS experience, they illustrate their work with two complete case studies of migration projects they worked on themselves. Their versatile solution is effective for any migration, including those to a client/server environment using relational DBMSs and 4GLs.

Features a special survey of migration tools by Jennifer Schmidt.

Note: the authors would be very interested in receiving a brief report on any successful legacy IS migration project using their methodology or any other, or of significant problems encountered in a migration attempt. As such projects take years, success can apply to the first significant increment. Please send reports by e-mail to Michael L. Brodie (brodie@gte.com) and Mike Stonebraker (mike@nobozo.CS.Berkeley.EDU)or via regular mail to:

Michael L. Brodie
GTE Laboratories Incorporated
40 Sylvan Road, MS-62
Waltham, MA 02254 USA

Information systems that resist modification and don't support organizational requirements are a critical business problem. The authors present a step-by-step strategy for complete IS migration to a new environment and discuss the potential problems and alternatives that may arise in the process.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Provides a framework for a workable system migration from old IS systems to new, based on incremental modifications that allow organizations to control costs and risks. Focusing on data migration, the authors outline techniques for designing, developing, testing, and deploying a new system using an 11-step method. Includes case studies, diagrams, checklists, and a chapter describing useful migration tools. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781558603301
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science & Technology Books
  • Publication date: 11/15/1994
  • Series: Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Managemen
  • Pages: 191
  • Product dimensions: 7.47 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Table of Contents

Migrating Legacy Systems: Gateways, Interfaces & The Incremental Approach by Michael L. Brodie and Michael Stonebraker
Foreword by Blayne Maring
Preface
1 Problems and Possibilities of Legacy Migration
1.1 The Legacy IS Problem
1.2 More About Legacy ISs
1.3 The Solution: Migration
1.4 About the Term Migration
1.5 Migration Strategies
1.5.1 The Cold Turkey Approach
1.5.2 The Chicken Little Alternative
1.6 Migration Complexity and IS Architectures
1.6.1 Decomposable Legacy IS Architectures
1.6.2 Semidecomposable Legacy IS Architectures
1.6.3 Nondecomposable Legacy IS Architectures
1.6.4 Discussion
1.7 The Role of Gateways
1.8 Interface Migration
1.9 Preparation and Global Design
1.10 The Chicken Little Steps
Step 1: Incrementally Analyze the Legacy IS
Step 2: Incrementally Decompose the Legacy IS Structure
Step 3: Incrementally Design the Target Interfaces
Step 4: Incrementally Design the Target Applications
Step 5: Incrementally Design the Target Database
Step 6: Incrementally Install the Target Environment
Step 7: Incrementally Create and Install the Necessary Gateways
Step 8: Incrementally Migrate the Legacy Database
Step 9: Incrementally Migrate the Legacy Applications
Step 10: Incrementally Migrate the Legacy Interfaces
Step 11: Incrementally Cut Over to the Target IS
1.11 Cutover
1.12 Version Control and Configuration Management
1.13 Preventing New Legacy ISs
1.14 Closing Remarks

2 Migrating Decomposable Legacy ISs
2.1 Decomposable Architectures and Chicken Little
2.2 Forward Migration method
Step 1: Incrementally Analyze the Legacy IS
Step 2: Incrementally Decompose the Legacy IS Structure
Step 3: Incrementally Design the Target Interfaces
Step 4: Incrementally Design the Target Applications
Step 5: Incrementally Design the Target Database
Step 6: Incrementally Install the Target Environment
Step 7: Incrementally Create and Install the Forward Database Gateway
Step 8: Migrate the Legacy Database
Step 9: Incrementally Migrate the Legacy Applications
Step 10: Incrementally Migrate the Legacy Interfaces
Step 11: Incrementally Cut Over to the Target
2.3 Reverse Migration Method for Deomposable Legacy ISs
Step 7: Incrementally Create and Install the Reverse Database Gateway
Step 8: Incrementally Migrate the Legacy Applications
Step 11: Incrementally Cut Over to the Target IS
2.4 General Migration Method
Step 5: Incrementally Design the Target Database
Step 7: Incrementally Create and Install the Database Gateway
Step 8: Incrementally Migrate the Legacy Database
Step 9: Incrementally Migrate the Legacy Applications
Step 11: Incrementally But Over to the Target
2.5 Closing Remarks

3 Case Study 1: Migrating Money CentralÆs Cash Management System
3.1 Our Background Research
3.2 Analysis of the CMS Core
3.3 The CMS Migration Plan
3.4 CMS Cutover Issues
3.5 Closing Remarks

4 Migrating Semidecomposable Legacy ISs
4.1 Semidecomposable IS Migration Method
Step 1: Incrementally Analyze the Legacy IS
Step 2: Incrementally Decompose the Legacy IS Structure
Step 3: Incrementally Design the Target Interfaces
Step 4: Incrementally Design the Target Applications
Step 5: Incrementally Design the Target Database
Step 6: Incrementally Install the Target Database
Step 7: Incrementally Create and Install the Application Gateway
Step 8: Incrementally Migrate the Legacy Database
4.2 The Remaining Steps: Application Migration, Interface Migration, and Cutover
4.3 Closing Remarks

5 Case Study 2: Migrating Global TelecomÆs Telephone Provisioning System
5.1 Some Basic Information
5.2 Analysis of TPS
5.3 The TPS Migration Gateway
5.4 The TPS Migration Plan, Part I
5.5 TPS Migration History

6 Migrating Nondecomposable Legacy ISs
6.1 The Migration Method
Step 1: Incrementally Analyze the Legacy IS
Step 2: Incrementally Decompose the Legacy IS Structure
Step 3: Incrementally Design the Target Interfaces
Step 4: Incrementally Design the Target Applications
Step 5: Incrementally Design the Target Database
Step 6: Incrementally Install the Target Environment
Step 7: Incrementally Create and Install the IS Gateway
Step 8: Incrementally Migrate the Legacy Database
Step 9: Incrementally Migrate the Legacy Applications
Step 10: Incrementally Migrate the Legacy Interfaces
Step 11: Incrementally Cut Over to the Target IS
6.2 Closing Remarks

7 Migrating Legacy ISs: A General Case
7.1 Architecture Notes
7.2 The General Case
Step 1: Incrementally Analyze the Legacy IS
Step 2: Incrementally Decompose the Legacy IS Structure
Step 3: Incrementally Design the Target IS
Step 4: Incrementally Install the Target Environment
Step 5: Incrementally Migrate
7.3 The TPS Migration Plan, Part II
7.4 Closing Remarks

8 Distributed Computing and Incremental Migration
8.1 Supporting Technologies
8.1.1 CORBA
8.1.2 OLE/COM
8.1.3 Distributed Databases
8.1.4 Transaction Monitors
8.1.5 Combined Architecture
8.1.6 The Horse Race
8.2 Distributed Computing Principles
8.2.1 Object Orientation
8.2.2 Openness and Standards
8.2.3 The Enterprise Information Architecture
8.3 Distributed Database Architectures
8.4 CORBA Architectures
8.4.1 Chicken Little Migration on a CORBA Architecture
8.4.2 CORBA-Based Application Integration and Migration Frameworks
8.5 Closing Remarks

9 Tool Wish List
9.1 Gateways
9.2 Specification Extractors
9.3 Application Analyzers
9.4 Dependency Analyzers
9.5 Migration Schema Design and Development Tools
9.6 Database Extractors
9.7 Higher-Level 4GLs
9.8 Distributed Systems Design and Performance Testing
9.9 Application Cutover
9.10 Distributed IS Development and Migration Environment
9.11 Migration Planning and Management
9.12 More Information on Tools

10 A Practical Implementation with Migration Tools by Jennifer Schmidt
10.1 Using Tools
10.1.1 Future Directions
10.2. Tool Categories
10.2.1 Gateways
10.2.2 Analyzers and Specification Extractors
10.2.3 Migration Tools
10.2.4 Testing
10.2.5 Configuration Management Tools
10.2.6 Full-Service Migration Consultants
10.3 Tools and the Chicken Little Steps
10.4 Migration Management
10.5 Getting Started
Glossary
References
Index
About the Authors
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