The Mi'kmaq: Resistance, Accommodation, and Cultural Survival / Edition 1

The Mi'kmaq: Resistance, Accommodation, and Cultural Survival / Edition 1

by Harald E. L. Prins
     
 

ISBN-10: 0030534275

ISBN-13: 9780030534270

Pub. Date: 01/02/1996

Publisher: Cengage Learning

Chronicled here are 500 years of the complex dynamics of Mi'kmaq culture. This text explores the group as a tribal nation-their ordeals in the face of colonialism and their current struggle for self-determination and cultural revitalization.

Overview

Chronicled here are 500 years of the complex dynamics of Mi'kmaq culture. This text explores the group as a tribal nation-their ordeals in the face of colonialism and their current struggle for self-determination and cultural revitalization.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780030534270
Publisher:
Cengage Learning
Publication date:
01/02/1996
Series:
Case Studies in Cultural Anthropology Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
250
Product dimensions:
6.45(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.42(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword vii(4)
Acknowledgments xi
1. Introduction: Quest for Cultural Survival
1(6)
2. Problems and Challenges: The Politics of History
7(12)
Internal Colonialism and Domestic Dependency
7(1)
Hegemony and Alienation: Endangered Heritage
7(4)
The Mi'kmaq as Ethnic Group
11(1)
Reconstructing History
12(1)
Political Significance of History
13(6)
3. Aboriginal Baseline: A Historical Ethnography
19(24)
Natural Habitat
19(1)
Mi'kmaq Origin Legends
20(1)
Klu'skap as Culture Hero
21(1)
The Prehistoric Past: Archaeological and Linguistic Evidence
22(3)
Personal Appearances: Dress, Hairstyle, Tattoos
25(1)
Demographics
26(1)
Mode of Production at the Time of Contact: Subsistence Foraging
27(3)
Portable Material Culture
30(2)
Social Structure: Family, Band, Tribe
32(1)
Social Division of Labor
33(1)
Political Organization: Saqmaq and Nikmanaq
33(2)
Grand Chief and District Chiefs
35(1)
Ideology: Worldview, Dreams, Guardian Spirits, and Shamanism
35(2)
Social Niche: Mi'kmaqs and Their Neighbors
37(2)
Intertribal Conflicts
39(2)
Conclusion
41(2)
4. First Contact: Europe's Advent and Klu'skap's Exit
43(12)
European Culture on the Eve of the Invasion
43(1)
Wenuj: Strangers on the Coast
44(1)
The Portuguese of Cape Breton: A Lost Colony (1525)
45(1)
Cartier's Explorations on the Mi'kmaq Coast (1534-1536)
45(2)
Cod Fishers and Fur Traders
47(2)
Mi'kmaqs as Fur Trade Middlemen
49(1)
Mi'kmaqs Discover Europe
50(2)
Mi'kmaq Perceptions and Attitudes Toward White Newcomers
52(1)
The "Great Dying": Epidemics on the Mi'kmaq Coast
53(2)
5. Moving In: European Colonists in Mi'kmaq Country
55(16)
International Linkages
56(1)
Colonization and the Seigneurial System in Mi'kmaq Country
57(2)
The Early Colonizers
59(4)
The Company of New France as Feudal Overlord (1627-1663)
63(2)
The French Crown Takes Over Seigneuries from New France Company
65(1)
Seigneuries in Acadia and Gaspesia
65(1)
Acadia's Indian Seigneuries
66(1)
Mi'kmaq-Acadian Intermarriages
67(2)
Conclusion
69(2)
6. Christianizing the Mi'kmaq: "Black Robes" and "Bare Feet"
71(18)
French Catholic Missions
72(1)
Jesuit Priests and Franciscan Recollects: Missionary Perspectives and Policies
73(1)
The Arrival of "Black Robes" in Mi'kmaq Country (1611-1613)
73(1)
The "Bare Feet" Spread Their Gospel (1619-1624)
74(1)
Capuchins: Other "Bare Feet" Priests in Mi'kmaq Country (1632-1654)
75(1)
"Black Robes" Return to Mi'kmaq Country
75(2)
Recollet Mission at Gaspe (1673-1690)
77(3)
Baptism as Alliance Ritual
80(2)
Cultural Resistance: Persistence of Shamanic Beliefs
82(2)
Cultural Accommodation: From Guardian Spirit to Patron Saint
84(1)
Mi'kmaq Hieroglyphs: Writing as Religious Agency
85(4)
7. Accommodation and Resistance: Mi'kmaq Life in the Colonial Period
89(14)
Commercial Fisheries
89(2)
Mi'kmaq-French Symbiosis: A Dual Society in Colonial Acadia
91(1)
Cultural Melange: Blending the New with the Old
92(3)
The Fur Trade: Mi'kmaq Market Hunting
95(3)
Decline of the Fur Trade: The Problem of Indian Alliances
98(1)
Sea Mammal Hunting
99(1)
Mi'kmaq Critiques of Europeans
100(3)
8. Cultural Stress: Alcoholic Rage and Beaver Wars
103(14)
Alcohol: Agent of Self-Destruction
103(2)
Game Depletion
105(1)
"Beaver Wars": Intertribal Conflicts
106(2)
Mi'kmaq-Stadaconan War
108(1)
Mi'kmaq-Abenaki War
108(1)
Mi'kmaq-Maliseet War
109(1)
Mi'kmaq-Massachusetts Wars
110(1)
Mi'kmaq-Montagnais War
111(1)
Mi'kmaq-Inuit Wars
112(1)
Mi'kmaq-Iroquois Wars
112(2)
Intertribal Diplomacy and Peace
114(3)
9. Colonial Wars and Alliances
117(16)
Mounting Anglo-French Rivalries
117(1)
Indian Involvement in European Rivalries
118(1)
The Wabanaki Confederacy
119(1)
Alliance Ceremonial Practices
119(1)
Kinship Terminology and Alliance
120(1)
French Missionaries as Warrior-Priests
121(1)
The Introduction of Commercial Scalping
122(1)
The First Anglo-Wabanaki War (1676-1678)
123(1)
The Second Anglo-Wabanaki War (1688-1698)
123(6)
The Rise and Fall of New England's Fort Pemaquid (1692-1696)
125(3)
New England's Counterattack and Termination of War
128(1)
The Third Anglo-Wabanaki War (1703-1713)
129(2)
Losing the Fight for Acadia
130(1)
Treaty of Utrecht (1713): Making Peace and Dividing Wabanaki Lands
131(2)
10. Colonial Wars: Losing the Armed Struggle for Independence
133(20)
Aboriginal Title: French Opportunism in Acadia After 1713
133(2)
Cape Breton as the New French Political Center
135(1)
French Proxy Warfare: Mi'kmaq Seafighters
135(1)
Mi'kmaq Missions and French Warrior-Priests
136(1)
The Fourth Anglo-Wabanaki War (1722-1726)
137(3)
Uneasy Peace and New Missionaries
140(1)
The Fifth Anglo-Wabanaki War (1744-1748)
141(2)
Mi'kmaqs in Exile
142(1)
Cease-Fire
143(1)
Halifax (1749) and the Changing Power Balance in Nova Scotia
143(2)
Treaty of 1752
145(2)
Keeping Anger Alive: France's Ongoing Need for Indian Allies
147(1)
The Sixth Anglo-Wabanaki War (1755-1760)
148(5)
Ethnic Cleansing: Expulsion of the French Acadians
148(2)
Fall of French Canada (1758-1759)
150(3)
11. More Treaties and Broken Promises
153(14)
The Royal Proclamation of 1763: Dispossession by Default
153(2)
Settling Mi'kmaq Lands
155(1)
The American Revolution (1775-1783)
156(6)
Wabanakis Join the Revolution
156(1)
Treaty of Watertown (1776)
157(1)
Warriors at Machias (1777-1780)
157(3)
Julian's Treaty (1779)
160(1)
Diplomatic Betrayal: The Treaty of Paris (1783)
161(1)
International Border-Crossing Rights: Jay Treaty (1794)
162(1)
The Demographics of Dispossession
163(3)
Conclusion
166(1)
12. Survival under Internal Colonialism
167(22)
Birth of the Reservation
168(2)
Spiritual Resort: Return of Catholic Priests
170(2)
Saint Anne: Mi'kmaq Patron Saint
172(2)
Mi'kmaq Chiefs: Political Organization and Indirect Rule
174(2)
Mi'kmaq Districts
176(1)
Changing Subsistence Strategies
177(2)
Porpoise Hunting in the Bay of Fundy (c. 1815-1895)
179(1)
Changing Material Culture: Fixed Dwellings and Common Dress
180(2)
Political Paternalism: Indian Agents
182(1)
Federal Guardianship: The Indian Act (1876)
183(2)
Indian Residential School of Shubenacadie
185(1)
Magic Heroes in the Enchanted World of Imagination
186(1)
Conclusion
187(2)
13. Mi'kmaq Cultural Survival: A Tribal Nation in the Modern World
189(30)
Mi'kmaq Personhood and Indian "Status"
189(1)
Mi'kmaq Bands Today: Federal Hegemony
190(1)
Reserves: Places of Refuge and Government Dependency
191(1)
Mi'kmaq Mobility and the Tribal Network
192(6)
Caroline Sark Copage: Oral History
193(2)
Donald and Mary Sanipass: Oral History
195(3)
Counterculture and Revival in Indian Country
198(1)
Political Resistance: Indian Unions and Self-Determination
199(1)
Radical Politics: AIM and the Killing of Anna Mae Pictou
200(2)
Cultural Renaissance
202(7)
The Paradox of Imprisonment: Discovering Indianness in Jail
202(1)
Sante' Mawio'mi and the Paradox of St. Anne
203(4)
Language: Key to the Survival of Mi'kmaq Culture
207(2)
Political Revitalization: Mi'kmaq Native Rights
209(5)
Land Claims
209(1)
Treaty Rights: Hunting and Fishing
210(1)
Challenging Sex Discrimination
211(1)
Boston Indian Council: Resurrecting the 1776 Watertown Treaty
212(1)
Rebirth of the Wabanaki Confederacy
212(1)
Beating the Melting Pot: Federal Recognition of the Aroostook Band in Maine
213(1)
Mi'kmaq Sovereignty
214(2)
Sovereignty and the Sante' Mawio' mi
214(2)
Conclusion
216(3)
Glossary 219(2)
Bibliography 221(14)
Credits 235(2)
Films on the Mi'kmaq: An Annotated List 237(2)
Index 239

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >