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Mildred and Sam (I Can Read Series: Level 2)

Overview

Mouse dreams

Mildred and Sam live in a tiny burrow underneath the daffodil roots. Sam is happy, but Mildred dreams of a bigger house. Will her dream come true?

When eight baby mice arrive, their father finally understands why their mother had wanted a bigger house.

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Overview

Mouse dreams

Mildred and Sam live in a tiny burrow underneath the daffodil roots. Sam is happy, but Mildred dreams of a bigger house. Will her dream come true?

When eight baby mice arrive, their father finally understands why their mother had wanted a bigger house.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Collicott's (Toestomper and the Caterpillars) cheery I Can Read Book introduces an endearing mouse couple living in a small hollow beneath a crop of daffodils. While Sam is content with their cozy home, Mildred is "fidgety" and fears that their abode isn't large enough. "There is no room for visitors," she tells Sam. In the first of the tale's three chapters, the duo's outings (a climb up an oak tree, a picnic on a lily pad, a tea-and-cookies repast in a rose thicket) lead Mildred on each occasion to ask, "Wouldn't it be nice to live here?" Sam's levelheaded responses (e.g., "But there is no door to keep us safe from the great owl," he says of the oak tree) inspire Mildred to dream whimsical scenarios, vividly portrayed in enchanting illustrations. (a painting of the owl carrying the couple skyward also reveals their tool for escape-an umbrella with which to parachute down). Mildred's dreams in the second section-which spring from her efforts to plant a garden-take on outlandish, decidedly child-pleasing proportions. Finally, the reasons for Mildred's "fidgeting" and nesting instincts are revealed: the couple welcomes eight new additions to their burrow-the payoff for Sam's feverish digging (to provide "plenty of room for visitors-just in case"). A well-balanced narrative with plenty of judiciously repeated phrases, plus fetching graphics, make this a fine choice for beginning readers, who will want to find out what happens to the mouse family next. Ages 3-7. (Jan.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Sam was very happy with their little burrow under the daffodil roots, but Mildred wanted more space. They tried a variety of places—an oak tree limb that offered no protection from predators like the big white owl. The lily pad and the rose thicket also had problems. Sam finally decided to take things into his own hands and with his spade and Mildred's help, he dug out another room. Mildred then decided to create a garden and planted some unmarked seeds among the vegetables. Suddenly they had a crop of baby gourds (live animals), who were eventually reunited with their parents. Mildred asked Sam to build yet another room and this time it was put to good use, as Sam and Mildred's family suddenly increased in size. Children may find the planting of gourds and having them turn into live creatures a bit strange, as did this reviewer. They may not relate to Mildred's constant request for more space and her onset of activity as an expectant mother—that seems to be more of an adult perspective. However, they will understand the need for more space as the family expands. "An I Can Read Book." 2003, HarperCollins,
— Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-A mouse couple lives in a tiny house. Sam is happy but Mildred is fidgety. She looks everywhere hoping to find a larger place to accommodate "visitors." She also has nightmares in which she and Sam have "to make a fast escape." This one good line is repeated several times. Following the dreams, Mildred begins planting a garden, making blankets, and knitting little things. At book's end, their enlarged house is "filled with visitors-eight tiny baby mice." This story feels like it is right out of the 1950s with the "little visitors" euphemism and never addressing the real issues. And what is the mystery seed that Mildred plants in her garden? Cute, candy-colored cartoon critters can't save this confusing book.-Elaine Lesh Morgan, Multnomah County Library, Portland, OR Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A persnickety house-mouse frets about the size of her burrow in this colorful beginning reader. Mildred and Sam inhabit a snug burrow that is just right for two tiny mice. When Mildred worries about the lack of room for guests, the two try out a sampling of habitats. The ever-practical Sam, who points out the inherent vulnerabilities of such abodes, quickly grounds Mildred’s flights of fancy regarding residing in the branches of a towering oak, floating on an oversized lily pad, and nestling in a rose thicket. Rather than move out, the pair decide to expand, adding deeper levels to their burrow. Mildred’s fantastical dreams persist, now involving the appearance of animated baby gourds that spring up from her garden and take over her little house. In the final chapter, Mildred embarks upon a frenzied fit of decorating. Collicott (Toestomper and the Caterpillars, 1999, etc.) slyly reveals the reason for Mildred’s fractiousness at tale’s end, with the arrival of her octuplets. The full-color illustrations are an engaging composite of bright colors and whimsical drawings that lend an immense visual appeal to the tale. While the length of the chapters and complexity of language is better suited for more assured readers, the fanciful themes and vibrant illustrations make this an enjoyable romp to share as a read aloud. (Easy reader. 5-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060002008
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 2/17/2004
  • Series: I Can Read Book 2 Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 391,322
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.12 (d)

Meet the Author

Sharleen Collicott is the author and illustrator of Toestomper and the Caterpillars, Seeing Stars, Mildred and Sam, and Mildred and Sam and Their Babies. She is also the illustrator of The Chicken Sisters by Laura Numeroff and Which Witch is Which? by Judi Barrett. She lives in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Sharleen Collicott is the author and illustrator of Toestomper and the Caterpillars, Seeing Stars, Mildred and Sam, and Mildred and Sam and Their Babies. She is also the illustrator of The Chicken Sisters by Laura Numeroff and Which Witch is Which? by Judi Barrett. She lives in Las Vegas, Nevada.

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