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Miles on Miles: Interviews and Encounters with Miles Davis
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Miles on Miles: Interviews and Encounters with Miles Davis

by Paul Maher Jr. (Editor), Michael K. Dorr (Editor)
 

Miles on Miles collects the thirty most vital Miles Davis interviews. Essential reading for anyone who wants to know what Miles Davis thought about his music, life, and philosophy, Miles on Miles reveals the jazz icon as a complex and contradictory man, secretive at times but extraordinarily revealing at others.

Miles was not only a musical genius,

Overview

Miles on Miles collects the thirty most vital Miles Davis interviews. Essential reading for anyone who wants to know what Miles Davis thought about his music, life, and philosophy, Miles on Miles reveals the jazz icon as a complex and contradictory man, secretive at times but extraordinarily revealing at others.

Miles was not only a musical genius, but an enigma, and nowhere else was he so compelling, exasperating, and entertaining as in his interviews, which vary from polite to outrageous, from straight-ahead to contrarian. Even his autobiography lacks the immediacy of the dialogues collected here. Many were conducted by leading journalists like Leonard Feather, Stephen Davis, Ben Sidran, Mike Zwerin, and Nat Hentoff. Others have never before seen print, are newly transcribed from radio and television shows, or appeared in long-forgotten magazines.

Since Miles Davis’s 1991 death, his influence has continued to grow. But until now, no book has brought back to life his inimitable voice—contemplative, defiant, elegant, uncompromising, and humorous. Miles on Miles will long remain the definitive source for anyone wanting to really encounter the legend in print.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"It's pleasurable to have [these interviews] in this one handy and thoughtfully edited volume."  —Library Journal

"Here is Miles Davis's less familiar voice, his speaking voice. . . . Maher and Dorr gather together Davis's greatest hits in Q & A, and they make compelling reading."  —Jack Chambers, author, Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis

"Most worthy . . . illustrative."  —Jazztimes

"Effectively portrays what the editors call the 'myriad mirrors to his life.'"  —Sacramento News & Review

"Miles [presented] in all his glory . . . fascinating."  —popmatters.com

"Provides startling insight."  —Star Tribune

"[A] telling book…gripping from beginning to end. You will not be able to put it down."  —examiner.com

"Everybody should read at least one book about Davis' life and music, and Miles on Miles is the perfect place to start."  —Winston-Salem Journal

Publishers Weekly

Davis was regarded by many as, in the words of one journalist, "the wickedest, canniest, deepest, slickest, baddest musician" of the last century, and Maher (Kerouac: His Life and Work) and Dorr, a poet and literary agent, have put together a collection of interviews covering the full spectrum of his career, from publicity materials linked to one of his earliest recordings for Columbia Records in the 1950s to a conversation two years before his death. Davis wasn't always the easiest person to talk to-"if you're going to shut up, man, I'll tell you" was his impatient response in one frustrating conversation-but when approached by the right person, someone with the perceptiveness of Nat Hentoff or Art Taylor, he could produce dazzling insights (in one 1987 interview, he spins intricate technical details on getting the right sound out of synthesizers). It's the little scenes that are most memorable: Davis at a birthday party for Louis Armstrong, or trying to persuade his "errand boy" biographer Eric Nisenson to make a late-night drug delivery. In some unfortunate cases, the interview is more about the self-important journalist celebrating his proximity to a jazz legend than about Davis himself, but even then it's impossible for anybody but Davis to hold the spotlight for long. (Nov.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
examiner.com
[A] telling book . . . ripping from beginning to end. You will not be able to put it down.
Shepherd Express
One of the most revealing books on Davis . . . excellent.
bullz-eye.com
Amazing for any fan of Miles . . . a valuable collection.
The Indianapolis Star
Provides an intimate portrait of a man both entertaining and exasperating.
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Informative.
Sacramento News & Review
Effectively portrays what the editors call the 'myriad mirrors to his life'
Orlando Weekly
Enlightening.
Jazztimes
Most worthy . . . illustrative.
Star Tribune
Provides startling insight.
The Journal Gazette
[Authors] have put together a collection of interviews covering the full spectrum of his [Davis'] career.
Essence
Jazz lovers will enjoy [it].
popmatters.com
[Authors] present Miles in all his glory . . . fascinating.
Billings Gazette
Offers a rare glimpse into one of the greatest minds, and most creative periods, in all of modern music.
Winston-Salem Journal
Everybody should read at least one book about Davis' life and music, and Miles on Miles is the perfect place to start.
Library Journal

Miles Davis is often thought of as a mystery man or a prince-of-darkness type. His prickly personality intimidated many, and his sometimes-lurid lifestyle led some to view him as above the average mortal. Yet as Maher (Jack Kerouac's American Journey) and poet and playwright Dorr show with this collection of interviews conducted over an extended period of time, Davis was consistent in his desire to give passionate music to his audiences and to help younger musicians develop into great musicians. He also liked to put people on. But from 1957 up to nearly the year he died (1991), many journalists and authors were able to delve deeper and discover a much more nuanced and brilliant musician behind Davis's public facade. Maher and Dorr bring together 28 interviews, some transcribed for the first time, which taken together give a fine portrait of Davis, demystifying him to a large extent. While many of these interviews can be found in a variety of publications, it's pleasurable to have them in this one handy and thoughtfully edited volume.
—William G. Kenz

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781556527067
Publisher:
Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/01/2008
Series:
Musicians in Their Own Words
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
610,351
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.20(d)

What People are Saying About This

Jack Chambers
Here is Miles Davis's less familiar voice, his speaking voice. . . . Maher and Dorr gather together Davis's greatest hits in Q & A, and they make compelling reading. (Jack Chambers, author, Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis)

Meet the Author

Paul Maher Jr. is the author of Jack Kerouac’s American Journey and Kerouac: His Life and Work and the editor of the critically acclaimed collection Empty Phantoms: Interviews and Encounters with Jack KerouacMichael K. Dorr is a poet, playwright, editor, former publisher, and founder of LitPub, Ink, a literary agency.

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