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Miles Smiles
     

Miles Smiles

4.6 3
by Miles Davis Quintet
 

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Miles Davis in later years freely admitted his modus operandi in organizing his influential '60s Quintet (Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter and Tony Williams): he hired a bunch of young thoroughbreds, jumped on their backs and rode. This

Overview

Miles Davis in later years freely admitted his modus operandi in organizing his influential '60s Quintet (Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter and Tony Williams): he hired a bunch of young thoroughbreds, jumped on their backs and rode. This '66 release is the finest of their six studio albums, long forays on six tunes -- half, including the landmark "Footprints," by Wayne Shorter -- showcasing the logical development of modal playing. The music is still demanding and it still irks those Miles Davis fans who became irritated at the increasingly abstract sound -- the chord changes were gone and Miles' own playing was getting more abrasive. More than 30 years after its release, young jazz musicians still sit in rooms dissecting the Silly Putty elasticity of the rhythm section, the long, lean solos of Shorter, Hancock and Davis, the songs that this album made standards (Eddie Harris' "Freedom Jazz Dance" and Jimmy Heath's "Gingerbread Boy"), and scratch their heads in awe.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
With their second album, Miles Smiles, the second Miles Davis Quintet really began to hit their stride, delving deeper into the more adventurous, exploratory side of their signature sound. This is clear as soon as "Orbits" comes crashing out the gate, but it's not just the fast, manic material that has an edge -- slower, quieter numbers are mercurial, not just in how they shift melodies and chords, but how the voicing and phrasing never settles into a comfortable groove. This is music that demands attention, never taking predictable paths or easy choices. Its greatest triumph is that it masks this adventurousness within music that is warm and accessible -- it just never acts that way. No matter how accessible this is, what's so utterly brilliant about it is that the group never brings it forth to the audience. They're playing for each other, pushing and prodding each other in an effort to discover new territory. As such, this crackles with vitality, sounding fresh decades after its release. And, like its predecessor, ESP, this freshness informs the writing as well, as the originals are memorable, yet open-ended and nervy, setting (and creating) standards for modern bop that were emulated well into the new century. Arguably, this quintet was never better than they are here, when all their strengths are in full bloom.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/01/1994
Label:
Columbia/Legacy Euro
UPC:
5099706568223
catalogNumber:
CK65682
Rank:
28721

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Orbits
  2. Circle
  3. Footprints
  4. Dolores
  5. Freedom Jazz Dance
  6. Gingerbread Boy

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Miles Davis Quintet   Primary Artist,Track Performer
Ron Carter   Bass
Miles Davis   Trumpet
Herbie Hancock   Piano
Wayne Shorter   Tenor Saxophone
Tony Williams   Drums

Technical Credits

Bob Belden   Producer,Liner Notes,Reissue Producer
Chris Albertson   Liner Notes
Michael Cuscuna   Producer,Reissue Producer
Frank Laico   Engineer
Teo Macero   Producer,Audio Production
Vernon Smith   Cover Photo
Mark Wilder   Engineer,Remixing
Howard Fritzson   Art Direction
Randall Martin   Reissue Design
Nicholas Bennett   Packaging Manager
Anthony Tuttle   Liner Notes

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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Miles Smiles 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album never gets old. It is easily my favorite Miles album (Kind of Blue is my favorite Jazz album, though). The music is beautiful, weird, and beautifully weird. The solos are all incredibly shaped and the band is very tight. This is recommended highly, although if you have not dealt with Miles before, especially in this era, it may be a little unpleasant. Once one listens a few times though, it is immediately clear how masterful it is. a must have.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago