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Military Instructions of Frederick the Great
     

Military Instructions of Frederick the Great

by Frederick II of Prussia
 
This is two books in one. THE KING OF PRUSSIA'S MILITARY INSTRUCTION TO HIS GENERALS and PARTICULAR INSTRUCTION OF THE KING OF PRUSSIA TO THE OFFICERS OF HIS ARMY, AND ESPECIALLY THOSE OF THE CAVALRY. These writings made Frederick one of the most influential military thinkers of all times whose influence continues to shape military operations today. This is essential

Overview

This is two books in one. THE KING OF PRUSSIA'S MILITARY INSTRUCTION TO HIS GENERALS and PARTICULAR INSTRUCTION OF THE KING OF PRUSSIA TO THE OFFICERS OF HIS ARMY, AND ESPECIALLY THOSE OF THE CAVALRY. These writings made Frederick one of the most influential military thinkers of all times whose influence continues to shape military operations today. This is essential reading for all students of military history and military science. This version is formatted especially for the Kindle with an active table of contents which links to every article of each of the works. Illustrations are included.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012295859
Publisher:
praetorian-press.com
Publication date:
04/02/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
441 KB

Meet the Author

Frederick II (German: Friedrich II.; 24 January 1712 – 17 August 1786) was a King in Prussia (1740–1772) and a King of Prussia (1772–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. In his role as a prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire, he was Frederick IV (Friedrich IV.) of Brandenburg. He was in personal union the sovereign prince of the Principality of Neuchâtel. He became known as Frederick the Great (Friedrich der Große) and was nicknamed Der Alte Fritz ("Old Fritz").

Interested primarily in music and philosophy and not the arts of war during his youth, Frederick unsuccessfully attempted to flee from his authoritarian father, Frederick William I, with childhood friend, Hans Hermann von Katte, whose execution he was forced to watch after they had been captured. Upon ascending to the Prussian throne, he attacked Austria and claimed Silesia during the Silesian Wars, winning military acclaim for himself and Prussia. Near the end of his life, Frederick physically connected most of his realm by conquering Polish territories in the First Partition of Poland.

Frederick was a proponent of enlightened absolutism. For years he was a correspondent of Voltaire, with whom the king had an intimate, if turbulent, friendship. He modernized the Prussian bureaucracy and civil service and promoted religious tolerance throughout his realm. Frederick patronized the arts and philosophers, and wrote flute music. Frederick is buried at his favorite residence, Sanssouci in Potsdam. Because he died childless, Frederick was succeeded by his nephew, Frederick William II of Prussia, son of his brother, Prince Augustus William of Prussia.

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