Military Neuropsychology

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Overview

...this foundational volume on military neuropsychology should be on the bookshelf of every mental health clinician that may come in contact with military service members.—International Journal of Emergency Mental Health

...an important text dedicated to this subspecialty in the larger field of neuropsychology...The book integrates in a coherent manner the different aspects of military neuropsychological practice and provides a clear clinical road map for neuropsychologists and other psychologists working with military personnel in various settings.—PsycCRITIQUES

This text covers the unique features of neuropsychological evaluations in the military. The author presents a thorough examination of the assessment needs of various military populations, with a special emphasis on traumatic brain injury, and the neurocognitive aspects of stress-related problems, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and decision-making under stress. The chapters of the book are designed to integrate theory and application, and include case study examples as well as a comprehensive review of the latest research.

Key features:

• Discusses the development of neuropsychology and its advances in the military
• Presents methods of dealing with military issues, such as head injuries, HIV, PTSD, learning disorders, and more
• Explains the importance of baseline testing, stress research, and multiple brain injury rehabilitation techniques

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Christopher J Graver, PhD, ABPP-CN(Madigan Healthcare System)
Description: Neuropsychology is a burgeoning field, especially in the context of military applications where the need to identify and treat soldiers with brain injuries is frequent and paramount. This book provides timely coverage of the information necessary to function as a neuropsychologist in the military setting.
Purpose: The aim of this book is provide a guide for neuropsychologists working in military settings to the numerous aspects of this specialized area of practice.
Audience: There are multiple places where "uniformed neuropsychologists" are addressed, but they are so few in number (in the neighborhood of 15 - 20) that the target is audience is extremely limited. This book also could be appropriate for civilian neuropsychologists in military settings, and clinical psychologists also may find it helpful. The editors are immersed in the military setting (one of them is a naval officer), and the contributing authors are well known in the field of neuropsychology in general.
Features: At first look, this book seems to cover the necessary topics, but deeper analysis reveals some surprising gaps in everyday issues which the authors are either unaware of or unwilling to include. This is apparent in the discussion of malingering in the first chapter, as the issues are presented with a clear bias and are not true to what is seen in everyday practice. In the second chapter on ethics, the issues are rather generic with only limited guidance. In addition, the chapter author makes generalizations about military culture that may be true to his individual experience, but are not widely applicable. The fitness for duty chapter provides a few nuggets of useful information about the MEB/PEB, but real-world considerations are missing, such as differentiating command-directed evaluations from physician-referred consults and the necessary regulations and paperwork (e.g., HFL Form 222) that accompany them. This theme continues throughout the book. It covers topics relevant to general neuropsychology, such as TBI, ADHD, and symptom validity, but specifics of the operation of regulations and evaluations in the military environment are notably limited or absent in some chapters. They also reflect politically correct biases, rather than the facts or science, and there is little information in key areas from individuals entrenched in this military work. Aeromedical evaluations fail to make an appearance altogether. Some chapter authors, while highly regarded in the field, do not work in a military environment, and as such would not be expected to have pertinent information, which makes them a dubious choice for a book on this topic. The sparkling reviews on the back cover are by individuals who do not work in military environments. Moreover, some of the chapters are not up to the usual high standard that is apparent in other publications by these same individuals. The editors' overly enthusiastic intrusion may also be at fault for controlling the content too much, as there are instances where their cases or ideas seem to intrude into the author's writing. Although chapter 5 on TBI is one of the best in the book, it also offers outdated information as current. Chapter 6 is redundant in some regards and fails to mention key articles that are mentioned by colleagues in chapter 5, suggesting that those authors are not completely current on the literature. Later chapters, such as the one on neuropsychological deficits associated with PTSD, fail to consider important limitations in the methodology employed in those studies and fall into the trap of professing catchphrases without critically thinking about what exactly they mean.
Assessment: Much of this book has generic applicability to neuropsychological topics, but falls short of the expertise offered in other books on neuropsychology. As a practical, hands-on guide to the need-to-know policies and procedures when functioning as a neuropsychologist in the military setting, it will be of little help. In fact, the danger is that the book presents itself as an authoritative source on the topic, giving unfamiliar readers a false sense of security, but there are notable gaps in the logistical aspects that might become problematic in practice.
From The Critics
Reviewer:Christopher J. Graver, PhD(Madigan Army Medical Center)
Description:Neuropsychology is a burgeoning field, especially in the context of military applications where the need to identify and treat soldiers with brain injuries is frequent and paramount. This book provides timely coverage of the information necessary to function as a neuropsychologist in the military setting.
Purpose:The aim of this book is provide a guide for neuropsychologists working in military settings to the numerous aspects of this specialized area of practice.
Audience:There are multiple places where "uniformed neuropsychologists" are addressed, but they are so few in number (in the neighborhood of 15 - 20) that the target is audience is extremely limited. This book also could be appropriate for civilian neuropsychologists in military settings, and clinical psychologists also may find it helpful. The editors are immersed in the military setting (one of them is a naval officer), and the contributing authors are well known in the field of neuropsychology in general.
Features:At first look, this book seems to cover the necessary topics, but deeper analysis reveals some surprising gaps in everyday issues which the authors are either unaware of or unwilling to include. This is apparent in the discussion of malingering in the first chapter, as the issues are presented with a clear bias and are not true to what is seen in everyday practice. In the second chapter on ethics, the issues are rather generic with only limited guidance. In addition, the chapter author makes generalizations about military culture that may be true to his individual experience, but are not widely applicable. The fitness for duty chapter provides a few nuggets of useful information about the MEB/PEB, but real-world considerations are missing, such as differentiating command-directed evaluations from physician-referred consults and the necessary regulations and paperwork (e.g., HFL Form 222) that accompany them. This theme continues throughout the book. It covers topics relevant to general neuropsychology, such as TBI, ADHD, and symptom validity, but specifics of the operation of regulations and evaluations in the military environment are notably limited or absent in some chapters. They also reflect politically correct biases, rather than the facts or science, and there is little information in key areas from individuals entrenched in this military work. Aeromedical evaluations fail to make an appearance altogether. Some chapter authors, while highly regarded in the field, do not work in a military environment, and as such would not be expected to have pertinent information, which makes them a dubious choice for a book on this topic. The sparkling reviews on the back cover are by individuals who do not work in military environments. Moreover, some of the chapters are not up to the usual high standard that is apparent in other publications by these same individuals. The editors' overly enthusiastic intrusion may also be at fault for controlling the content too much, as there are instances where their cases or ideas seem to intrude into the author's writing. Although chapter 5 on TBI is one of the best in the book, it also offers outdated information as current. Chapter 6 is redundant in some regards and fails to mention key articles that are mentioned by colleagues in chapter 5, suggesting that those authors are not completely current on the literature. Later chapters, such as the one on neuropsychological deficits associated with PTSD, fail to consider important limitations in the methodology employed in those studies and fall into the trap of professing catchphrases without critically thinking about what exactly they mean.
Assessment:Much of this book has generic applicability to neuropsychological topics, but falls short of the expertise offered in other books on neuropsychology. As a practical, hands-on guide to the need-to-know policies and procedures when functioning as a neuropsychologist in the military setting, it will be of little help. In fact, the danger is that the book presents itself as an authoritative source on the topic, giving unfamiliar readers a false sense of security, but there are notable gaps in the logistical aspects that might become problematic in practice.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780826104489
  • Publisher: Springer Publishing Company, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/15/2010
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 888,045
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Carrie H. Kennedy, PhD, is a Lieutenant Commander in the Medical Service Corps of the U.S. Navy. After receiving her PhD in clinical psychology from Drexel University in 2000, she completed a two year Postdoctoral Neuropsychology fellowship at the University of Virginia Medical School. She is board certified in Clinical Psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology and is a licensed psychologist in Maryland and Virginia. In addition to her academic training, Dr. Kennedy is a graduate of the Naval Education and Training Command's Officer Indoctrination School. Currently, she is a Clinical Neuropsychologist at the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute where she conducts evaluations on aviators, air crew and air traffic controllers. As part of her deployment duties, she was Chief of Behavioral Health Services for detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Dr. Kennedy is the author of over a dozen peer-reviewed journal articles, the co-editor of the book Military Psychology (Guilford) and co-author of the forthcoming book Ethics of Operational Psychology (APA). Dr. Kennedy serves on the Conflict of Interest Committee for the National Academy of Neuropsychology and is the Psychology Ethics Consultant for the Clinical Committee of the American Psychological Association's Division 19, Society for Military Psychology.

Jeffrey L. Moore, PhD received his doctoral degree from Auburn University and completed his post-doctoral fellowship in Clinical Neuropsychology at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. He retired from active duty U. S. Naval service in 1997. While a Naval officer, he established neuropsychological laboratories at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth and the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute. Since his active duty retirement, Dr. Moore has served as Clinical Neuropsychologist for the Robert E. Mitchell Center for POW Studies. Dr. Moore is a fellow in both the National Academy of Neuropsychology and the Aerospace Medical Association, and is a recipient of the Raymond F. Longacre Award for his contributions regarding the psychological aspects of aerospace medicine.

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Table of Contents

1 A history and introduction to military neuropsychology Carrie H. Kennedy Kennedy, Carrie H. Corwin Boake Boake, Corwin Jeffrey L. Moore Moore, Jeffrey L. 1

2 Ethical issues in military neuropsychology Shane S. Bush Bush, Shane S. George M. Cuesta Cuesta, George M. 29

3 Fitness for duty Mark P. Kelly Kelly, Mark P. Kevin P. Mulligan Mulligan, Kevin P. Mark C. Monahan Monahan, Mark C. 57

4 Noncredible neuropsychological presentation in service members and veterans Manfred F. Greiffenstein Greiffenstein, Manfred F. 81

5 Blast injury and traumatic brain injury Louis M. French French, Louis M. Jack Spector Spector, Jack William Stiers Stiers, William Robert L. Kane Kane, Robert L. 101

6 Acute battlefield assessment of concussion/mild TBI and return-to-duty evaluations Jeffrey T. Barth Barth, Jeffrey T. William C. Isler Isler, William C. Katherine M. Helmick Helmick, Katherine M. Ilaina M. Wingler Wingler, Ilaina M. Michael S. Jaffee Jaffee, Michael S. 127

7 Head injury rehabilitation of military members Treven C. Pickett Pickett, Treven C. Mark C. Bender Bender, Mark C. Eugene Gourley Gourley, Eugene 175

8 Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and learning disorders David W. Hess Hess, David W. Carrie H. Kennedy Kennedy, Carrie H. Rebecca A. Hardin Hardin, Rebecca A. Thomas Kupke Kupke, Thomas 199

9 HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in the military Steven Paul Woods Woods, Steven Paul Erica Weber Weber, Erica J. Allen McCutchan McCutchan, J. Allen Robert K. Heaton Heaton, Robert K. 227

10 The neuropsychological functioning of prisoners of war following repatriation Jeffrey L. Moore Moore, Jeffrey L. 267

11 Cognitive sequelae of sustained operations Nancy J. Wesensten Wesensten, Nancy J. Thomas J. Balkin Balkin, Thomas J. 297

12 Neuropsychological correlates of PTSD : a military perspective Jennifer J. Vasterling Vasterling, Jennifer J. Helen Z. MacDonald MacDonald, Helen Z. Erin W. Ulloa Ulloa, Erin W. Nicole Rodier Rodier, Nicole 321

13 Cognition and decision making in extreme environments Jeffrey A. McNeil McNeil, Jeffrey A. C. A. Morgan III Morgan, C. A., III 361

14 The future of military neuropsychology Robert A. Seegmiller Seegmiller, Robert A. Robert L. Kane Kane, Robert L. 383

Index 405

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