Milk Glass Moon

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Milk Glass Moon, the third book in Adriana Trigiani's bestselling Big Stone Gap series, continues the life story of Ave Maria Mulligan MacChesney as she faces the challenges and changes of motherhood with her trademark humor and honesty. With twists as plentiful as those found on the holler roads of southwest Virginia, this story takes turns that will surprise and enthrall the reader.

Transporting us from Ave Maria's home in the Blue Ridge ...
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Overview

Milk Glass Moon, the third book in Adriana Trigiani's bestselling Big Stone Gap series, continues the life story of Ave Maria Mulligan MacChesney as she faces the challenges and changes of motherhood with her trademark humor and honesty. With twists as plentiful as those found on the holler roads of southwest Virginia, this story takes turns that will surprise and enthrall the reader.

Transporting us from Ave Maria's home in the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Italian Alps, from New York City to the Tuscan countryside, Milk Glass Moon is the story of a shifting mother-daughter relationship, of a daughter's first love and a mother's heartbreak, of an enduring marriage that contains its own ongoing challenges, and of a community faced with seismic change.

All of Trigiani's beloved characters are back: Jack Mac, Ave Maria's true love, who is willing to gamble security for the unknown; her best friend and confidant, bandleader Theodore Tip-ton, who begins a new life in New York City; librarian and sexpert Iva Lou Wade Makin, who faces a life-or-death crisis. Meanwhile, surprises emerge in the blossoming of crusty cashier Fleeta Mullins, the maturing of mountain girl turned savvy businesswoman Pearl Grimes, and the return of Pete Rutledge, the handsome stranger who turned Ave Maria's world upside down in Big Cherry Holler.

In this rollicking hayride of upheaval and change, Ave Maria is led to places she never dreamed she would go, and to people who enter her life and rock its foundation. As Ave Maria reaches into the past to find answers to the present, readers will stay with her every step of the way, rooting for the onetime town spinster whoembraced love and made a family. Milk Glass Moon is about the power of love and its abiding truth, and captures Trigiani at her most lyrical and heartfelt.


Author Biography: Adriana Trigiani grew up in Big Stone Gap, Virginia, and now lives with her husband in New York City. In addition to being the bestselling author of Big Stone Gap and Big Cherry Holler, she is an award-winning playwright, television writer, and documentary filmmaker. She has written the screenplay for the film version of Big Stone Gap, which she will also direct.


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Editorial Reviews

Susan Tekulve
In the final novel of the Big Stone Gap trilogy, Adriana Trigiani returns to the Virginia mountain setting of her first two bestselling novels, 2000's Big Stone Gap and 2001's Big Cherry Holler. Ave Maria, that Italian-American girl from Cracker's Neck Holler, is now teetering on the precipice of middle age. Still married to house contractor Jack MacChesney, she faces the new challenge of raising her quickly developing daughter, Etta.

The episodic narrative begins when Etta is twelve and spans six years. In an early scene, Ave finds Etta on top of the MacChesneys' old stone house, helping two family friends patch the roof. When the girl slips, Ave props a ladder against the house and eases her safely to the ground. This moment prefigures the central conflict of the book—the natural tension between a fearful mother and a daughter who resists her mother's attempts to keep her safe. Sometimes, this tension is difficult to believe. Sensible and pretty, Etta is more interested in astronomy and architecture than boys. She even sets the dinner table without being asked.

Trigiani seasons the mother/daughter story with tidbits of mountain lore, both Appalachian and Italian. She inserts full recipes for pansotti and chocolate Coca-Cola cake in the middle of her narrative. Big Stone Gap fans will also enjoy catching up with the characters from the first two novels. In between mothering crises, Ave visits her old friend Theodore at his new apartment in New York City and meets up with Pete Rutledge, the hunky marble exporter with whom she romped through a Tuscan field of bluebells. Ave's loyal best friend, Iva Lou, still drives the local bookmobile and talks like a pluckycountry-and-western song. During a girls' night out in Abingdon to see a musical production of Fair and Tender Ladies, Iva Lou and Ave joke about being just like the characters in the play "on a good night."

This comparison to Lee Smith's gorgeous, authentic novel about another Virginia mountain girl, Ivy Rowe, is unfortunate because it draws attention to the weaknesses in Trigiani's novel. Trigiani's characters may be gussied-up Appalachian people, but the narrative voices and artistic visions of these two books are vastly different. Smith's heroine is landlocked by mountains and relentless poverty, but she continually reaches beyond her own limited experience. Though college educated and well traveled, Ave Maria consistently oversimplifies the people and places she encounters, and sometimes her own emotions.

Both heroines are deeply tied to the mountains that surround their hometowns. Smith chronicles the modernization of southern Appalachia, exploring the complex effects of lumber and coal companies that have plowed through this region, leaving behind whole communities struggling to retain a way of life that is no longer viable. Trigiani's heroine finds peace and a loving community in her small town, and the most lyrical passages in Milk Glass Moon occur when Ave finds consolation in the soulful mountain scenery. Flying home from New York City, Ave sees the Blue Ridge mountains rolling out beneath her window and remarks, "Southwest Virginia is an uncomplicated place for a complex person, and I miss it whenever I go."

While the coal operations hover menacingly outside the borders of Big Stone Gap, Trigiani creates and sustains a sweet, nostalgic portrait of bucolic mountains and simple small-town folk. However, those looking for a complex treatment of this region and its people will not find it in this novel.
Publishers Weekly
The third book in Trigiani's series about the middle-aged but young-at-heart Ave Maria of Big Stone Gap in the Blue Ridge Mountains is simply made for the ear. The author colorfully and flawlessly captures the characters' southern and Italian accents, transporting listeners into Ave Maria's charmed world. She's a pharmacist in a small Virginia town but has relatives in Italy; and her daughter Etta has just entered her teen years, causing Ave Maria much heartache and uncertainty. She's torn between wanting Etta to mature and wishing Etta was much younger. She cheerfully discusses affairs from the daily chatter at the drugstore counter to more serious matters, such as the death of her son years earlier and her best friend Iva Lou's breast cancer. The dialogue is always snappy (e.g., after Ave Maria has seen a man she's attracted to, Iva Lou quips, "That's how they keep us hooked... those rats"). The words, as well as Trigiani's cadence and emotions, allow listeners to easily envision each character. They'll appreciate Ave Maria's enthusiasm when she visits New York and Italy and describes everything in lush detail. But when she's flying home and remarks, "southwest Virginia is an uncomplicated place for a complicated person," listeners will also understand exactly what is meant. This is a treasure of an audio. Simultaneous release with the Random House hardcover (Forecasts, June 24). (July) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
The last in the "Big Stone Gap" trilogy (Big Stone Gap, Big Cherry Holler) brings us back to Ave Maria and Jack Mac during daughter Etta's teenage years. Despite upheaval and family tensions, this is a happy book, sprinkled with gentle, down-home humor and a rich sense of place the mountains of both Virginia and Italy. The advice from the Wise County Fair fortune-teller to "redream" or reinvent one's life is perfect for readers of all ages. Trigiani does a fine job of resolving 20-year story lines while still leaving readers wanting more. Fans of the previous novels will savor this title as well while anticipating the film version of Big Stone Gap. Recommended for popular fiction collections. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 3/1/02; chronology problems existed in the advance uncorrected proofs, which, one hopes, have been remedied. Ed. ] Rebecca Sturm Kelm, Northern Kentucky Univ. Lib., Highland Heights Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Windup of the Big Stone Gap trilogy. Big Stone Gap (2000) led us into the sleepy Virginia town of that name via the memories of Ave Maria Mulligan, a spinster pharmacist who learned that her real father was an Italian boy from Bergamo and tracked him down. In Big Cherry Holler (2001), Ave was married with a ten-year-old daughter Etta, grieving memories of a son who died of leukemia, and suspicions that husband Mac had a dish on the side. This last installment is at heart a mother/daughter story. Ave arrives in her 50s, menopausal, worried, and scared. She goes to a fortuneteller who knows all and predicts certain events that the reader awaits to see fulfilled. Etta, verging on adulthood, looks forward to studies in architecture at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville and to a trip to Italy-Bergamo, in fact. This throws Ave deep into trauma, but she comes to learn, as she tells us, "Love may not be enough, but when it's right, it's plenty." Down-home dialogue gives a big lift to Ave's agonies.
From the Publisher
Praise for Big Cherry Holler

"Trigiani is a wonderful storyteller. . . . Readers will enjoy Big Cherry Holler immensely." –USA Today

"Fans of the first novel will rejoice. . . . Ave heads to Italy to find strength and healing in her ancestry. . . . Trigiani deftly juxtaposes the culture of the Appalachian mountains with that found in the Italian Alps."–Southern Living

"Heartwarming . . . Everything that really matters is here: humor, romance, wisdom, and drama." –The Dallas Morning News

"Trigiani can make you laugh in one sentence then break your heart the next. Her Big Stone Gap series is sure to become the next Mitford."–The Clarion-Ledger (Jackson, Mississippi)

Praise for Big Stone Gap

"As comforting as a mug of chamomile tea on a rainy Sunday." –The New York Times Book Review

"Delightfully quirky . . . chock-full of engaging, oddball characters and unexpected plot twists."–People

"In this delightful tale of intimate community life in the hamlet of Big Stone Gap, the characters are as real as the ones who live next door."–The Sunday Oklahoman

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375506185
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 7/7/2002
  • Series: Big Stone Gap Series , #3
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 6.38 (w) x 9.54 (h) x 0.99 (d)

Meet the Author

Adriana Trigiani
Adriana Trigiani grew up in Big Stone Gap, Virginia, and now lives with her husband in New York City. In addition to being the bestselling author of Big Stone Gap and Big Cherry Holler, she is an award-winning playwright, television writer, and documentary filmmaker. She has written the screenplay for the film version of Big Stone Gap, which she will also direct.


From the Hardcover edition.

Biography

As her squadrons of fans already know, Adriana Trigiani grew up in Big Stone Gap, a coal-mining town in southwest Virginia that became the setting for her first three novels. The Big Stone Gap books feature Southern storytelling with a twist: a heroine of Italian descent, like Trigiani, who attended St. Mary's College of Notre Dame, like Trigiani. But the series isn't autobiographical -- the narrator, Ave Maria Mulligan, is a generation older than Trigiani and, as the first book opens, has settled into small-town spinsterhood as the local pharmacist.

The author, by contrast, has lived most of her adult life in New York City. After graduating from college with a theater degree, she moved to the city and began writing and directing plays (her day jobs included cook, nanny, house cleaner and office temp). In 1988, she was tapped to write for the Cosby Show spinoff A Different World, and spent the following decade working in television and film. When she presented her friend and agent Suzanne Gluck with a screenplay about Big Stone Gap, Gluck suggested she turn it into a novel.

The result was an instant bestseller that won praise from fellow writers along with kudos from celebrities (Whoopi Goldberg is a fan). It was followed by Big Cherry Holler and Milk Glass Moon, which chronicle the further adventures of Ave Maria through marriage and motherhood. People magazine called them "Delightfully quirky... chock full of engaging, oddball characters and unexpected plot twists."

Critics sometimes reach for food imagery to describe Trigiani's books, which have been called "mouthwatering as fried chicken and biscuits" (USA Today) and "comforting as a mug of tea on a rainy Sunday" (The New York Times Book Review). Food and cooking play a big role in the lives of Trigiani's heroines and their families: Lucia, Lucia, about a seamstress in Greenwich Village in the 1950s, and The Queen of the Big Time, set in an Italian-American community in Pennsylvania, both feature recipes from Trigiani's grandmothers. She and her sisters have even co-written a cookbook called, appropriately enough, Cooking With My Sisters: One Hundred Years of Family Recipes, from Bari to Big Stone Gap. It's peppered with anecdotes, photos and family history. What it doesn't have: low-carb recipes. "An Italian girl can only go so long without pasta," Trigiani quipped in an interview on GoTriCities.com.

Her heroines are also ardent readers, so it comes as no surprise that book groups love Adriana Trigiani. And she loves them right back. She's chatted with scores of them on the phone, and her Web site includes photos of women gathered together in living rooms and restaurants across the country, waving Italian flags and copies of Lucia, Lucia.

Trigiani, a disciplined writer whose schedule for writing her first novel included stints from 3 a.m. to 8 a.m. each morning, is determined not to disappoint her fans. So far, she's produced a new novel each year since the publication of Big Stone Gap.

"I don't take any of it for granted, not for one second, because I know how hard this is to catch with your public," she said in an interview with The Independent. "I don't look at my public as a group; I look at them like individuals, so if a reader writes and says, 'I don't like this,' or, 'This bit stinks,' I take it to heart."

Good To Know

Some fascinating, funny outtakes from our interview with Trigiani:

"I appeared on the game show Kiddie Kollege on WCYB-TV in Bristol, Virginia, when I was in the third grade. I missed every question. It was humiliating."

"I have held the following jobs: office temp, ticket seller in movie theatre, cook in restaurant, nanny, and phone installer at the Super Bowl in New Orleans. In the writing world, I have been a playwright, television writer/producer, documentary writer/director, and now novelist."

"I love rhinestones, faux jewelry. I bought a pair of pearl studded clip on earrings from a blanket on the street when I first moved to New York for a dollar. They turned out to be a pair designed by Elsa Schiaparelli. Now, they are costume, but they are still Schiaps! Always shop in the street -- treasures aplenty."

"Dear readers, I like you. I am so grateful that you read and enjoy my books. I never forget that -- or you -- when I am working. I am also indebted to the booksellers who read the advanced reader's editions and write to me and say, "I'm gonna hand-sell this one." That always makes me jump for joy. I love the people at my publishing house. Smart. Funny, and I like it when they're slightly nervous because that means they care. The people I have met since I started writing books have been amazing on every level -- and why not? You're readers. And for someone to take reading seriously means that you are seeking knowledge. Yes, reading is fun, but it is also an indication of a serious-minded person who values imagination and ideas and, dare I say it, art. I never thought in a million years when I was growing up in Big Stone Gap that I would be writing this to you today. Books have always been sacred to me -- important, critical, fundamental -- and a celebration of language and words. And authors! When I was little, I didn't play Old Maid, I played authors. They had cards with the famous authors on them. Now, granted, they didn't look like movie stars, but I loved what they wrote and had to say. I can boil this all down to one thing: I love to tell stories -- and I love to hear them. I didn't think there was a job in the world where I would get to do both, and now thank God, I've found it."

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The Wise County Fair is my daughter’s favorite event of the year, and I think it’s safe to say that includes Christmas. Etta has been on her best behavior for the past two weeks, so perfect down to the smallest detail (including unassigned chores like making my bed and weeding my garden) that I’m worried.

We have the window flaps of the Jeep down, and the warm August air whipping through is sweet with honeysuckle. Still, it is no match for Iva Lou’s perfume, which wafts up to the front seat whenever we peel around a curve. Etta looks out the window for road signs, searching for proof that we’re almost there. I’ve taken the quicker route, the valley road out of Big Stone Gap up to Norton. As we ascend the mountains in twilight, we pass Coeburn nestled in the valley below, where the cluster of lights twinkles like a scoop of emeralds. Etta smoothes her braids and settles back in her seat.

“Here’s the plan. First we eat,” Iva Lou announces as she unfolds the special to the newspaper. “I myself am having a jumbo caramel apple with nuts, and if I have to go see Doc Guest for a bridge on Monday, then so be it. Them caramel apples are worth a molar.”

“I want the blue cotton candy,” Etta decides.

“I want a chili dog with onions,” I reply.

“I have a lot of money,” Etta says proudly as she sifts through her change purse.

“Ask Dad to spring for dinner. That will leave you more money for the games of chance.”

Etta smiles and carefully counts her money without lifting it out of the purse. I see a five-dollarbill folded neatly into a small square (some lucky clay-pigeon operator is about to score a windfall).

“What if we can’t find him?” she asks.

“We’ll find him.”

“Just go straight to the outdoor the-a-ter. He’s up there with all them men checking out the rehearsal for Miss Lonesome Pine.”

“He built the stage,” I remind Iva Lou in a tone that says, Don’t start with that again.

“That’s as good a reason as any, then.” Iva Lou meets my eye in the rearview mirror and winks.

We find a parking spot under a tree overlooking the fairgrounds and climb out of the Jeep. Iva Lou checks her hair in the driver’s side mirror and then smiles at us, ready to go. She’s wearing a pair of dark blue denim pedal pushers and a red bandanna-print blouse tied at the waist. Her Diamonelle hoop earrings peek out from under her platinum bob like giant waterwheels. Iva Lou is ageless; you would never know she is fifty-something. Her look, however, is best viewed from a distance, like a fine painting. You don’t want to get so close that you get lost in the details.

Etta looks at the fairgrounds with a clinical eye, surveying the faded striped tents surrounded by torches like birthday candles. She smiles when she spots the Ferris wheel. “Ma, will you go on the rides with me?”

“Sure.” But Etta knows that at the last second in line, when we’re ready to go up the metal plank, I’ll send her father with her instead.

“Do we have to go to the beauty pageant?” she asks.

“I thought you liked it.”

“I like the dresses all right. The talent’s always terrible.” Etta shrugs. She’s right. Last year, leggy blond Ellen Tierney, representing Big Stone Gap, did a dance routine to “Happy to Keep Your Dinner Warm”; her tap shoe flew off when she did a high kick, clocked a man in the first row, and knocked him out. The victim was rushed to the hospital and revived, but he may have the imprint of the metal tap on his forehead for life. “And I hate the physical-fitness part when they come out and jump around in bathing suits. Anybody can do that stuff.”

“Etta, hon, it don’t take a lot of talent to look good in a bathing suit. That you’re born with.” Iva Lou breathes deeply and straightens her shoulders. “I ought to know.”

“I’m never gonna be in a beauty pageant,” Etta announces.

“Me neither.” I give my daughter a quick hug.

The benches in the outdoor theater are filling up fast. The aisles are covered in Astroturf runners; the stage is banked in garlands of red paper roses; the backdrop is a cutout of a giant pine tree with miss lonesome pine written in gold leaf.

School starts in a few weeks. I can’t believe Etta is twelve years old and going into the seventh grade. My mother would have been sixty-six this year. I feel oddly lost between them: not old yet, not young anymore. I thought motherhood was a job with security, but it’s not. It’s the least permanent job in the world, the only job in which your skills become obsolete overnight. It was that way from the beginning. When I finally got a handle on breast-feeding, it was time for solid food. I worried that Etta wasn’t turning over in the crib on her own, but soon she was crawling, and then, before I knew it, walking. When she went to school, I thought she’d need me more, but all of a sudden she had a life apart from me and was just fine. And now, after we’ve established a routine as a family, in which Etta has responsibilities, she’s developed a newfound independence and her own opinions. This is, of course, the point of all of it—preparing your children to leave you—yet I’m so afraid to let go. I don’t know how I’ll handle it when she’s eighteen and leaves for college. How did my mother do it? I wish she were here to lead me through these changes.

“Dad!” Etta waves to Jack, who waves back to her from a platform at the side of the stage. He finishes helping the spot operator set the light levels, then climbs down the ladder to join us. My husband is still agile; his strong arms hook down the ladder rhythmically. His jeans are faded to dusty blue, and his white T-shirt frames his gray hair beautifully. Sometimes, when I see him in the distance, I forget he’s mine and think, What a fine-looking man. He still makes my heart race—quite a feat after all these years. His straight nose and lips are surrounded not by wrinkles but by expression lines. He’s damn cute, my husband. I try not to hate him for aging so well.

Otto Olinger approaches, wiping his face with a bandanna. “We barely got that stage up in time. Ain’t that right, Worley?” Otto turns to his son, whose white hair makes him look around the same age as his father.

“It was rough,” Worley agrees.

“ ’Cause you ain’t got your minds on your work. Too busy ogling the girls,” Iva Lou tells them.

“We did us some looking.” Worley smiles.

Otto shrugs. “Can’t hardly help it, they’s so purty. Of course, I ain’t never seen me no ugly women, just some that’s purtier than others.”

Jack gives me a kiss and takes Etta’s hand. “You want to watch from up there?” he asks her.

“Yeah!”

“We’ve got a couple of seats down front for you.”

I turn to Iva Lou. “Do you want to stay?”

“What do you want to do?”

“I’d rather wander around.”

“Let’s wander, then.” Iva Lou turns to go up the ramp.

“Okay, we’ll catch up with you later.” Jack Mac takes Etta to the ladder and helps her to the top. She kneels on the platform as her father explains something about the equipment. She listens and nods. I can’t believe she’s my kid and not afraid of heights. In fact, she’s fearless about everything—picking up stray animals, speaking in public, boys. Etta cares about how things work; in that way, she is just like her father. She is all MacChesney, and that’s not always easy for me to accept.

“What are we gonna do?” Iva Lou asks.

“We’re going to see Sister Claire.”

“Who the hell is that? A Catholic?”

“No. She’s a fortune-teller.”

“No voodoo for me, girlfriend.”

“Come on. After she makes you drink a cocktail of eye of newt and puts a spell on you, it’s all uphill.”

Sister Claire has a small dark green tent by the edge of the grounds. Two folding chairs are set up outside the flap. I’m surprised there isn’t a line of people waiting. Sister Claire is well known in these parts; she’s from the mountains of North Carolina near Greensboro. A pharmaceutical salesman out of Raleigh who traveled through Big Stone encouraged me to see Sister if she was ever in the area. He told me that she was the genuine article, a true mystic. I’m surprised when a small, gentle woman of sixty, with a heart-shaped face and skin the color of strong tea, emerges from the tent to greet us.

“Are you here to see me?” she asks. “I’m Sister Claire.”

Iva Lou turns away and grabs my arm to return to the hub of the fair, where no one knows the future, not even the judges of the Miss Lonesome Pine Contest.

“Yes ma’am. We are.” Iva Lou shoots me a look, so I correct myself. “I am,” I say earnestly, not knowing exactly how to address a psychic.

“Welcome.”

“I think most of the people are at the beauty pageant,” I tell her, apologizing for her lack of clientele.

Sister Claire turns to Iva Lou and looks her straight in the eye. “I understand if the idea of a reading makes you uncomfortable. I don’t like to have my cards read.”

“Really?” Iva Lou squeaks.

“Really. It’s a commitment to believe. It takes blind faith. Sometimes not even I have that.”

“Well, it’s not that I’m scared, and I certainly believe in the comings and goings of the spirit world. It’s just that I, well, I live my life a certain way, and I don’t want to know where it’s all going.”

“I understand.”

“Wait here, then. Okay?” I give Iva Lou a wink and follow Sister Claire inside. The tent is sparsely furnished with two folding chairs and a small red lacquer table between them. An electric cord attached to a small generator runs up the side of the tent to a low-wattage bulb, which dangles in a protective metal sleeve overhead. Sister Claire motions for me to sit, then pours us each a glass of water. She sits down at the table and rests one hand on a deck of large tarot cards.

“I hear you’re a Native American,” I say as she shuffles the cards.

“Cherokee. Descendant of the great Chief Doublehead. ’Course, all of us that’s Cherokee claim that.” She smiles.

“Mother and father both?”

“Yes. But I’m mixed. I also had a grandmother who was African-American and a grandfather who was Irish.”

“The green eyes give you away.”

“Every time.”

“How did you discover your talent for this?”

“It’s not so much a talent as a way of being. It tends to run in families. My mother read cards and had visions, and so do I.” She stops shuffling the cards and asks me to pick one. “How can I help you?”

I was prepared with an answer—I have lots of questions about the future—but suddenly I can’t speak. “I’m sorry.”

“Don’t be sorry. Let’s look at you.” Sister Claire shuffles again and places twelve cards on the table, creating a sunburst pattern.

“What is your name?”

“Ave Maria.”

“That’s unusual.”

“Especially in these parts.”

“That’s the name of the Blessed Mother. You can tell a lot by a person’s name.”

“What does my name tell you?”

“You’re named after a strong woman, some would say a goddess. You’ve been surrounded by strong women since the day you were born. You’re very lucky. You are loved and protected, and I see many women around you, almost making a fence. Your mother passed?”

“Yes.”

“She did and she didn’t. She’s with you always.” Sister Claire sits back in the chair and closes her eyes. “She’s wearing purple.”

“My mother?”

“Yes.”

“I buried my mother in a purple suit. She made it herself out of crepe silk she bought on one of her husband Fred Mulligan’s buying trips to New York. She told me that, for the longest time, she didn’t want to make anything out of the fabric because it was so beautiful she couldn’t bear to cut it into pieces.”

“Fred Mulligan was not your father.”

“No ma’am.”

“And it caused you great pain when you learned the truth.”

“It did. But in a way, it was also the great blessing of my life. I found my real father in Italy, and my whole family.”

Sister Claire leans back and closes her eyes. “Your mother is showing me a house with many rooms. She is hanging curtains in the windows.”

“She used to make curtains.”

“There’s a boy in the room. He just walked in. He has brown eyes and curly brown hair. Who is he?”

“My son.”

“He passed?” she asks me quietly.

“Yes ma’am.”

“Very young?”

“He was four years old.”

Sister Claire laughs. “He’s funny. He’s happy with her. She is looking out for him.” She opens her eyes and looks at me.

Sister Claire goes on to tell me lots of things—about my job, about Jack, about Etta. She sees us traveling together, and she sees Etta taking a new path, which validates my feeling that my daughter is going where she wants to go, with or without my blessing.

“Sister, how does the afterlife work?”

“What do you mean?”

“Will my son always be four years old and my mother the age she was when she died? And when I die . . .”

“What do you think?”

“I thought that they were in a holding pattern, waiting for Judgment Day.”

Sister Claire laughs, though I wasn’t trying to be funny. “That’s a possibility, and it all depends. Your mother and son wanted you to know they’re okay, so they came to me in a way you would recognize them. This doesn’t happen every time.”

“So they are . . . somewhere, right?”

“I like to think the idea of them is somewhere, but that their energy is eternal and that it’s very possible they’ll return to life as different people to learn new things.”

“So they could be here?”

“Anywhere.”

“Should I be looking for them?”

“You won’t have to look for them; they’ll find you.” Sister Claire shuffles the cards and this time lines them up in a single row. She asks me to pick another from the deck. “Now for your future.”

I take a deep breath. “I’m ready.”

“You’ve set many goals for yourself in your lifetime. And you’ve met most of them. But what I see here is that you have to begin anew. You have to decide where your life is going; you must redream.”

“Redream?”

“You have to reinvent your life. You have to think about what you want to accomplish in the second half of your life. Do you understand?”

I nod that I do, but I don’t really, or maybe I’m not ready to think about the rest of my life. My present path is so clear—I want to raise my daughter, nurture my husband, and keep working. I don’t think much beyond that, though I know it is dangerous not to. “Sister Claire? I never think about what I want anymore, or about what the future holds. I barely have time to get everything done in the present. How do I redream?”

“There are two times a day when the soul is open to new ideas. The first is when you rise, in the stillness of morning. The second is at night, when you’re in that hazy place between being awake and going to sleep. At those times, ask your inner voice to guide you. Your intuition will lead to the answers you’re looking for.”

“My mother used to say that all the answers were inside me.”

“She was right. The problem is, we don’t trust our inner voice. But that voice will guide us in the right direction every time. It really is the key to happiness: just listen.” Sister Claire slides the cards into a single deck once more.

I pay her and quickly review all she said to me. There’s so much to think about. I am a little stunned that my mother and son could be looking for me but I might not know them. What good will that do? The smell of Iva Lou’s cigarette brings me back. She’s sitting on one of the folding chairs outside the tent, puffing away. “All set,” I tell her.

“Well, honey-o, since we’re here, maybe I’ll get a reading too.” Iva Lou turns to Sister Claire and points with her pinkie finger. “But I’m warnin you, Sis, don’t tell me when I’m gonna die, even if you know. Okay, I amend that. You can tell me when I’m gonna die if it’s at a hundred and one with all my faculties intact and a young man up in the bed next to me who thinks I’m better than pepper jelly.”

Sister Claire laughs. “You got a deal.”

They go inside the tent, and I can hear the quiet muttering between them. I sit down, stretching my legs and leaning back in the chair. From this angle, I can see the spotlight at the beauty pageant make a tunnel of silver light against the black mountain. It is a smoky beam, barely visible as it competes with the Ferris wheel spinning streaks of pink glitter. The mountains funnel the sound of the applause and the wolf whistles up into the night sky; the way the sound carries in these hills, the pageant could be a thousand miles from here. How easy it is to get lost in the noise of this world, to find yourself leading a life of acceptance and resignation. When will I find the time to question my life again? Is there anything new ahead of me, or is this it? Being a wife, a mother, a pharmacist? What does Sister Claire mean when she tells me I have to invent myself all over again? To be what? And how?

After what seems like a much longer time than my reading took, Iva Lou emerges from the tent, fishing in her purse for another cigarette.

“So?”

“Oh, honey, I’ve never heard such good news. Sister Claire was chock-full of all kinds of information. I just hope I can remember it all so I can write it down. She said I’m an eagle.”

“Is that a good thing?”

“Absolutely. I’m regal and self-possessed and all that. But of course, tell me something I didn’t already know for fifteen bucks. How about you?”

“Mama and Joe came to me.”

“What did they say?”

“They didn’t say anything. But it’s okay. They showed up; that’s all I needed.”

Iva Lou puts her arm around me as we head back into the lights and the noise, but I don’t see them or hear it. My mind is in that house with many rooms.


Copyright 2002 by Adriana Trigiani
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

Foreword

1. Milk Glass Moon is the final book in the Big Stone Gap trilogy. Does it stand on its own as an individual novel? Which themes from Big Stone Gap and Big Cherry Holler carry over into Milk Glass Moon?

2. What does the symbol of the milk glass moon signify? Also, through Etta’s interest in astrology, Trigiani presents stars as prominent reoccurring images. What significance do the stars have in the novel?

3. Why does Ave Maria experiences so much friction with Etta, when they have had such a good relationship in the past? Do you think their problems arise from normal adolescence angst, or do they stem from deeper issues? How do you think Ave Maria and Etta’s relationship would be if Ave Maria’s own mother were still alive?

4. Is Ave Maria too hard on Etta for her mistakes, in particular the coal and drinking incidents? Do you think she overreacts, given the fact that she had very different perceptions from the other characters, or is she justified in her decisions? How do you think Ave Maria’s actions would appear to the reader if she were portrayed in third person, without the inner dialogue we are privy to?

5. Ave Maria and Jack’s display apparent differences in their reactions and outlooks throughout Milk Glass Moon, especially in the area of parenting. How do you think they have sustained their marriage? What sacrifices have they made for each other? Why does their marriage work?

6. When Ave Maria sees Pete in New York City, old feelings stir within her. Why does Trigiani bring Pete back into the picture? What do you think would have happened if Ave Maria had chosenPete over Jack? How would their marriage be different? Do you think Ave Maria’s physical reactions to Pete are problematic?

7. Ave Maria describes Pete as being the only person who can see the girl in her. What does she mean? Which qualities in particular does Pete pull out of her? Would you pick comfort over excitement, like Ave Maria ultimately does, or vice-versa?

8. Ave Maria believes that it’s easier for women to have close relationships and intimate friendships than men. Do you agree with her? Given the history between Ave Maria and Pete, what do you think about Pete and Jack’s friendship?

9. Ave Maria is presented with choices throughout the course of Milk Glass Moon; she is tugged between locations, men, and time frames. How do you think she goes about making decisions? If you were her, would you have made the same choices?

10. Ave Maria sometimes seems to be torn between her desire to live in a small town and her wish to explore the allure and excitement of places like New York City and Italy. Throughout the novel, Ave Maria explores the downsides as well as the upsides of living in a small town, and in certain moments, it appears that Ave Maria hasn’t quite gotten over the difficulties she long ago experienced in her transition to a small town. Where do you think she ultimately belongs and feels most comfortable? Do you think she and Jack would be happy living in Italy, as their plan at the end of the novel suggests? What kind of environment are you most comfortable in, and why?

11. Does Ave Maria’s personality change when she’s in a location other than Big Stone Gap? Which hidden qualities we don’t usually see in her persona emerge?

12. Etta tells her mother that she knew she was meant to marry Stefano when she was eight years old. How do issues of fate and destiny play out in Milk Glass Moon? In general, do you think every event has a reason for happening?

13. According to Etta, Ave has trouble getting attached to people. Do you think her statement is true? What are some examples that either support or disagree with it?

14. Three different kinds of marriages are explored throughout the novel … those of Ave Maria and Jack, Iva Lou and Louis, and Etta and Stefano. How do they compare?

15. Throughout the course of three books, Ave clearly progresses through various encounters she never planned on facing. How do you think she has changed from the beginning of the trilogy? Which kind of strengths has she gained? Which personality traits has she held onto?

16. Does Trigiani wrap up everything neatly, or does she leave room for any future developments in Big Stone Gap world? Is there anything from these characters that you would like to see more of? Do the themes and characters’ situations in Milk Glass Moon come full circle or is anything left unresolved?

Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

Milk Glass Moon, the third book in Adriana Trigiani's bestselling Big Stone Gap series, continues the life story of Ave Maria Mulligan MacChesney as she faces the challenges and changes of motherhood with her trademark humor and honesty. With twists as plentiful as those found on the holler roads of southwest Virginia, this story takes turns that will surprise and enthrall the reader.

Transporting us from Ave Maria's home in the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Italian Alps, from New York City to the Tuscan countryside, Milk Glass Moon is the story of a shifting mother-daughter relationship, of a daughter's first love and a mother's heartbreak, of an enduring marriage that contains its own ongoing challenges, and of a community faced with seismic change.

All of Trigiani's beloved characters are back: Jack Mac, Ave Maria's true love, who is willing to gamble security for the unknown; her best friend and confidant, bandleader Theodore Tip-ton, who begins a new life in New York City; librarian and sexpert Iva Lou Wade Makin, who faces a life-or-death crisis. Meanwhile, surprises emerge in the blossoming of crusty cashier Fleeta Mullins, the maturing of mountain girl turned savvy businesswoman Pearl Grimes, and the return of Pete Rutledge, the handsome stranger who turned Ave Maria's world upside down in Big Cherry Holler.

In this rollicking hayride of upheaval and change, Ave Maria is led to places she never dreamed she would go, and to people who enter her life and rock its foundation. As Ave Maria reaches into the past to find answers to the present, readers will stay with her every step of the way, rooting for the onetime town spinster whoembraced love and made a family. Milk Glass Moon is about the power of love and its abiding truth, and captures Trigiani at her most lyrical and heartfelt.

From the Hardcover edition.

1. 1.Milk Glass Moon is the final book in the Big Stone Gap trilogy. Does it stand on its own as an individual novel? Which themes from Big Stone Gap and Big Cherry Holler carry over into Milk Glass Moon?

2.What does the symbol of the milk glass moon signify? Also, through Etta's interest in astrology, Trigiani presents stars as prominent reoccurring images. What significance do the stars have in the novel?

3.Why does Ave Maria experiences so much friction with Etta, when they have had such a good relationship in the past? Do you think their problems arise from normal adolescence angst, or do they stem from deeper issues? How do you think Ave Maria and Etta's relationship would be if Ave Maria's own mother were still alive?

4.Is Ave Maria too hard on Etta for her mistakes, in particular the coal and drinking incidents? Do you think she overreacts, given the fact that she had very different perceptions from the other characters, or is she justified in her decisions? How do you think Ave Maria's actions would appear to the reader if she were portrayed in third person, without the inner dialogue we are privy to?

5.Ave Maria and Jack's display apparent differences in their reactions and outlooks throughout Milk Glass Moon, especially in the area of parenting. How do you think they have sustained their marriage? What sacrifices have they made for each other? Why does their marriage work?

6.When Ave Maria sees Pete in New York City, old feelings stir within her. Why does Trigiani bring Pete back into the picture? What do you think would have happened if Ave Maria had chosen Pete over Jack? How would their marriage be different? Do you think Ave Maria's physical reactions to Pete are problematic?

7.Ave Maria describes Pete as being the only person who can see the girl in her. What does she mean? Which qualities in particular does Pete pull out of her? Would you pick comfort over excitement, like Ave Maria ultimately does, or vice-versa?

8.Ave Maria believes that it's easier for women to have close relationships and intimate friendships than men. Do you agree with her? Given the history between Ave Maria and Pete, what do you think about Pete and Jack's friendship?

9.Ave Maria is presented with choices throughout the course of Milk Glass Moon; she is tugged between locations, men, and time frames. How do you think she goes about making decisions? If you were her, would you have made the same choices?

10.Ave Maria sometimes seems to be torn between her desire to live in a small town and her wish to explore the allure and excitement of places like New York City and Italy. Throughout the novel, Ave Maria explores the downsides as well as the upsides of living in a small town, and in certain moments, it appears that Ave Maria hasn't quite gotten over the difficulties she long ago experienced in her transition to a small town. Where do you think she ultimately belongs and feels most comfortable? Do you think she and Jack would be happy living in Italy, as their plan at the end of the novel suggests? What kind of environment are you most comfortable in, and why?

11.Does Ave Maria's personality change when she's in a location other than Big Stone Gap? Which hidden qualities we don't usually see in her persona emerge?

12.Etta tells her mother that she knew she was meant to marry Stefano when she was eight years old. How do issues of fate and destiny play out in Milk Glass Moon? In general, do you think every event has a reason for happening?

13.According to Etta, Ave has trouble getting attached to people. Do you think her statement is true? What are some examples that either support or disagree with it?

14.Three different kinds of marriages are explored throughout the novel … those of Ave Maria and Jack, Iva Lou and Louis, and Etta and Stefano. How do they compare?

15.Throughout the course of three books, Ave clearly progresses through various encounters she never planned on facing. How do you think she has changed from the beginning of the trilogy? Which kind of strengths has she gained? Which personality traits has she held onto?

16.Does Trigiani wrap up everything neatly, or does she leave room for any future developments in Big Stone Gap world? Is there anything from these characters that you would like to see more of? Do the themes and characters' situations in Milk Glass Moon come full circle or is anything left unresolved?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 35 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(17)

4 Star

(13)

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1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2002

    Sad Farewell

    I thoroughly enjoyed this third glimpse into the life and times of Big Stone Gap. These characters have come to feel like neighbors and close friends. Please tell me that this isn't the farewell novel. Hopefully, we will hear from this wonderful town again.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 26, 2013

    I'm loving how the saga continues the lives and loves of these c

    I'm loving how the saga continues the lives and loves of these characters. Middle age has hit Big Stone Gap and along with that the joys, heartbreaks, and struggles that accompany that time in our lives. Still loving the characters and the amazing pictures that Ms. Trigiana paints as she continues this amazing story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Just Ok

    This was my least favorite of the Big Stone Back trilogy. It seemed the author didn't really have a direction in mind so it just went off on a boring path. The story would skip several years in an effort to wrap up the lives of each of the charecters. There was very little plot development in this book.

    I was disapointed especially since I thoroughly enjoyed the first two books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 1, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Another Hit in the Big Stone Gap Series

    Adriana Trigiani does it again in this third installment of the Big Stone Gap Series. Ave Maria Mulligan MacChesney is your best friend, but in paper. She thinks like we do, expresses herself as she feels needed, but will let go at just the right moment.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2013

    Sam

    Ask how many ne.dle.s did u put in me. Do u like the new me mommy and still c.um hard

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2012

    To rena

    my name is jon

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2012

    Loved it!

    Loved it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2005

    The book was over too soon..

    I get pulled into the Adriana Trigiani novels and they end far too soon. I looked into my own life and realized that with her wisdom I understood myself a great deal more. Her books are truly a treasure!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2004

    I love this author,,,,

    This book is a great addition to the Big Stone Gap books. I loved all of the characters and I love her writing. Every mom and woman should read these books. I can only hope that she will continue on with these characters. I miss them all. I have preordered her next book, I can't wait.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2003

    enjoyable...

    I have to say after reading all three of the BSG books, none can compare to BSG itself. I loved that book! BCH wasn't even in the same ballpark, but I thought AT picked it back up a bit with MGM. I found myself laughing more in this one than I did BCH which was a huge disappointment considering it's rather serious subject matter. When I go for a Southern Comedic Novel I wanna laugh, folks. MGM does deliver and is worth the read in my opinion.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2003

    Predictable in all its mediocrity

    As richly written as the characters and plotlines were in Big Stone Gap, none of that magic was evident in this novel. Predictable plotlines and one-dimensional characters left me disappointed.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2003

    Milk Glass Moon

    This is an awesome book. The novel follows Ave MacChesney and her daughter, Etta, through their trials as Etta grows into a lady. In their small town of Cracker's Neck Holler, everyone is family. Deaths, moves, and other surprises bring laughter and tears to the MacChesney family and their friends. Ave and her husband, Jack, try to bring up etta the best they can, yet Ave's views differ from Jack's. Ave has the harder time dealing with co-ed birthday parties, first crushes, college decisions and Etta's marriage. I would definitely recommend this book for both adults and teenagers.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2003

    Wonderful book & easy read

    I read this Trigiani book 1st and loved it so much I have now read all her books. The Big Stone Gap Trilogy is wonderful, heartwarming and beautifully written.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2002

    Its no Big Stone Gap

    I get the sense that the author spent YEARS mulling over Big Stone Gap and it showed. It was humorous, rich and engaging. The two subsequent books seem to be the product of pressure to produce sequels. They are rushed and not nearly as engaging. Overall, I'm glad I got it out of the library instead of purchasing. I hope she changes gears so that she gets her spirit back.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2002

    Don't let it end like this!

    We started reading Adriana Trigiani's books for our book club, and we all got addicted. I think the first installment was the best, as Ave Maria and Jack Mac just have too darn many problems in the second one, and the third is just a little boring, but still sweet. If anyone is looking for a similar tone with fresh characters, go for Anne Lamott's novels, especially Rosie and Crooked Little Heart (Rosie came first). They're great.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2002

    WAITING FOR ANOTHER TRIGIANI....

    I have just finished the trilogy (Big Stone Gap, Big Cherry Holler, Milk Glass Moon), and am now in Adriana Trigiani withdrawl!! If you haven't experienced these books(and it IS a true experience),RUN, don't walk, to your nearest Barnes and Noble and purchase every one. You won't regret it. I read all three books in a week, and have now passed them on to my mom, who is equally addicted.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2002

    I wish Ave Maria lived in my town.

    This was very enjoyable, however I do not feel this was the best of the series. You must read it though if you have read Big Cherry Holler and Big Stone Gap. Ave Maria is wonderful and we get to see her be a little bit more vulnerable in this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2002

    Disappointing

    I read the first two books in this series and loved them. I was so excited when Milk Glass Moon came out, but was very disappointed throughout the whole book. It was very predictable and boring... nothing like the first two books. You could tell the author was trying to end the series because she was quickly trying to tie up all the loose ends and she did it in a very clumsy way. I didn't like this book very much at all.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2002

    Beautiful and Insightful!

    As the mother of two daughters, I thought Milk Glass Moon was brilliantly written. Not only did I love the simple wisdom I gleaned from this novel, but I identified with the struggles of both mother and daughter. It is very beautiful and insightful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 Customer Reviews

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