The Mill on the Floss [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Mill on the Floss is a novel by George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans), first published in three volumes in 1860 by William Blackwood. The first American edition was published by Thomas Y. Crowell Co., New York.

The novel spans a period of 10 to 15 years and details the lives of Tom and Maggie Tulliver, siblings growing up at Dorlcote Mill on the River Floss at its junction with the more minor River Ripple near ...
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The Mill on the Floss

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Overview

The Mill on the Floss is a novel by George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans), first published in three volumes in 1860 by William Blackwood. The first American edition was published by Thomas Y. Crowell Co., New York.

The novel spans a period of 10 to 15 years and details the lives of Tom and Maggie Tulliver, siblings growing up at Dorlcote Mill on the River Floss at its junction with the more minor River Ripple near the village of St. Ogg's in Lincolnshire, England. Both the river and the village are fictional.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940148242888
  • Publisher: Bronson Tweed Publishing
  • Publication date: 1/18/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 580 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 15 )
Rating Distribution

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(8)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2003

    de best book in da world

    i thought that it woz great. its easy 2 read and has an absorbing plot. maggie is great this is the first george eliot book ive read but won't be the last.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2001

    The best Love Story I have ever read...

    Geoge Eliot's rhetoric prowess is beyond ones speculation. The scenic depiction of the medival England adds elegance to this peice of marvel. The changing instinctions of a girl to woman is portrayed very elegantly and reveals the subtle difference in the attitudes which diffrentiates a woman from girl. Maggie is such a philanthrophic heart which a man strives to have as his beloved. The Tom Boyish 'Tom' is portrayed eqaully well. The noble 'Philip Wakem' exhibits those qualities which portrays a perfect gentleman. It is quite hard to beleive this peice of literature as a fiction. No wonder George Eliot is one of the greatest writers this world has ever seen... No wonder artists are born and not made...

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 23, 2012

    Maggie Tulliver, who is age seven when the story opens, lives at

    Maggie Tulliver, who is age seven when the story opens, lives at Dorlcote Mill on the River Ripple at its junction with the River Floss near the village of St. Ogg’s in England, with her father, who owns the mill, mother, and older brother Tom. The novel spans a period of ten to fifteen years, beginning with Tom’s and Maggie’s childhood and including her father’s ongoing battles with a lawyer named Wakem, the Tullivers’ consequent bankruptcy resulting in the loss of the mill, and Mr. Tulliver’s untimely death. Tom has been in school with Philip Wakem, the lawyer’s hunchbacked, sensitive, and intellectual son, and Maggie has grown fond of Philip, seeing him secretly. To help repay his father’s debts, Tom leaves his schooling to enter a life of business, but in his hatred of the Wakems, he forbids Maggie’s seeing Philip, and she languishes in the impoverished Tulliver home, renouncing the world after reading Thomas à Kempis’s The Imitation of Christ.
    Some years later, Tom has been successful and able to restore the family’s former estate. Lucy has been away teaching school but returns to visit with her cousin, Lucy Deane. Her acquaintance with Philip is renewed and he still loves her, but Stephen Guest, a young socialite in St. Ogg's who is Lucy’s fiancé, is also attracted to her. Maggie enjoys the clandestine attentions of Stephen, but when he substitutes for the sick Philip in taking her on a boat ride and proposes that they stop in Mudport, and get married, she rejects him and makes her way back to St. Ogg's, where, rejected by her brother Tom and almost everyone else except her mother, Tom’s friend Bob Jakin and his family, in whose home she takes lodgings, and the minister, Dr. Kenn, who engages her as governess for his children, she lives for a brief period as an outcast, though she does reconcile with both Philip and Lucy. When the flood comes, Maggie sets out in one of Bob’s boats to rescue Tom, and together they head to rescue Lucy, but their boat capsizes and the two drown in an embrace, thus giving the book its Biblical subtitle, “In their death they were not divided.”
    I have always liked Eliot’s Silas Marner because it is, in the final analysis, a tale of redemption. However, The Mill on the Floss is not primarily a tale of redemption. In fact, the book is somewhat autobiographical in that it reflects the disgrace that the author herself felt while involved in a lengthy relationship with a married man, George Henry Lewes, although there are differences. No actual immorality is portrayed in the book, and towards the end, Maggie does make the right choice. Biblical quotations and allusions abound throughout, but I am not sure that the book represents a truly Biblical worldview. Many of Eliot’s observations about the nature of people and society are interesting, with some of which you may agree and others you may not, but occasionally her social commentary goes on and on to the point of becoming boring. Like The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, in the right hands The Mill on the Floss could be used to teach a good lesson on not being judgmental, but due to the “titillating” nature of the story I would recommend that it not be inflicted on anyone under age eighteen.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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