The Mill on the Floss (Norton Critical Editions Series)

( 15 )

Overview

The best-known and most autobiographical of George Eliot’s novels is now available as a Norton Critical Edition.
The text of The Mill on the Floss, that of the 1862 third edition for which Eliot made her last revisions, has been annotated in order to assist the reader with obscure references and allusions.
"Backgrounds" includes fifteen letters from the 1859-69 period centering on the novel’s content and composition; "Brother and Sister" ...

See more details below
Paperback (1st ed)
$20.00
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (25) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $10.86   
  • Used (19) from $1.99   
The Mill on the Floss

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$0.95
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

The best-known and most autobiographical of George Eliot’s novels is now available as a Norton Critical Edition.
The text of The Mill on the Floss, that of the 1862 third edition for which Eliot made her last revisions, has been annotated in order to assist the reader with obscure references and allusions.
"Backgrounds" includes fifteen letters from the 1859-69 period centering on the novel’s content and composition; "Brother and Sister" (1869), a little-known sonnet sequence; and eight Victorian reviews and responses, both published and unpublished, on the novel, including those by Henry James, Algernon Charles Swinurne, and John Ruskin.
Judiciously chosen from the wealth of essays on The Mill on the Floss published in this century, "Criticism" includes ten of the best studies of the novel, providing the reader with historical and critical perspective.
The contributors are Leslie Stephen, Virginia Woolf, F. R. Leavis, George Levine, Ulrich Knoepflmacher, Philip Fisher, Mary Jacobus, John Kucich, Margaret Homans, and Deirdre David.
A Chronology and Selected Bibliography are also included.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393963328
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 11/28/1993
  • Series: Norton Critical Editions Series
  • Edition description: 1st ed
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 640
  • Sales rank: 713,159
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Born Mary Ann Evans, Victorian novelist George Eliot (1819-1880) is the author of a number of remarkable works, including the masterpiece Middlemarch.

Carol T. Christ (Ph.D. Yale) is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of California, Berkeley, and President of Smith College. She is the author of The Finer Optic: The Aesthetic of Particularity and Victorian Poetry and Victorian and Modern Poetics and editor of the Norton Critical Edition of The Mill on the Floss and, with John Jordan, Victorian Literature and the Victorian Visual Imagination. She is the recipient of an NEH Fellowship and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 15 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2003

    A reader's delight

    The story though sad and gloomy is addictive at the same time. I could not keep my eyes off the pages through a larger part of the story. I read with much intrest the passages used to describe subtle emotions. Undoubtedly, George Eliot has complete mastery to communicate feelings with as much ease as leisure talk. The similies are superb, and when combined with the feeling of finding some part of the novel corresponding with your own views, makes one wonder with amazement over the fact that the novel written so long ago could hold true even today.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2002

    The best book for me

    This is the very sad story of a young woman, Maggie Tulliver,who lives in a small English village. She must choose between her family and the man she loves. She is very unhappy because she does not know what to do.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2001

    It Sparkles!!!!

    George Eliot has a way of making life appear magical and despairing at the same time. Maggie Tulliver suffers tremendous trials and greivances yet everyone can't help fall in love with her. She leads a pitiable, confused life , yet she is filled with such passion for it(life) that she never once gives up despite all of the burdens she is forced to carry. Overall- a glorious story of the conflicts between love and loyalty, passion and responsibiltiy, luxury and reputation. It's one of those books that you know needs to be shared but you can't help wanting to keep it's sparkle all to yourself. (At least thats the way I feel) The only tragedy for me was that it ended; it was really long but I just wanted it to go on and on forever. Call me sentimental, but wouldn't this make a great movie? Really! When you're done reading the book, E-amil me and help me write a script...

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2001

    The best Love Story I have ever read...

    Geoge Eliot's rhetoric prowess is beyond ones speculation. The scenic depiction of the medival England adds elegance to this peice of marvel. The changing instinctions of a girl to woman is portrayed very elegantly and reveals the subtle difference in the attitudes which diffrentiates a woman from girl. Maggie is such a philanthrophic heart which a man strives to have as his beloved. The Tom Boyish 'Tom' is portrayed eqaully well. The noble 'Philip Wakem' exhibits those qualities which portrays a perfect gentleman. It is quite hard to beleive this peice of literature as a fiction. No wonder George Eliot is one of the greatest writers this world has ever seen... No wonder artists are born and not made...

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 23, 2012

    Maggie Tulliver, who is age seven when the story opens, lives at

    Maggie Tulliver, who is age seven when the story opens, lives at Dorlcote Mill on the River Ripple at its junction with the River Floss near the village of St. Ogg’s in England, with her father, who owns the mill, mother, and older brother Tom. The novel spans a period of ten to fifteen years, beginning with Tom’s and Maggie’s childhood and including her father’s ongoing battles with a lawyer named Wakem, the Tullivers’ consequent bankruptcy resulting in the loss of the mill, and Mr. Tulliver’s untimely death. Tom has been in school with Philip Wakem, the lawyer’s hunchbacked, sensitive, and intellectual son, and Maggie has grown fond of Philip, seeing him secretly. To help repay his father’s debts, Tom leaves his schooling to enter a life of business, but in his hatred of the Wakems, he forbids Maggie’s seeing Philip, and she languishes in the impoverished Tulliver home, renouncing the world after reading Thomas à Kempis’s The Imitation of Christ.
    Some years later, Tom has been successful and able to restore the family’s former estate. Lucy has been away teaching school but returns to visit with her cousin, Lucy Deane. Her acquaintance with Philip is renewed and he still loves her, but Stephen Guest, a young socialite in St. Ogg's who is Lucy’s fiancé, is also attracted to her. Maggie enjoys the clandestine attentions of Stephen, but when he substitutes for the sick Philip in taking her on a boat ride and proposes that they stop in Mudport, and get married, she rejects him and makes her way back to St. Ogg's, where, rejected by her brother Tom and almost everyone else except her mother, Tom’s friend Bob Jakin and his family, in whose home she takes lodgings, and the minister, Dr. Kenn, who engages her as governess for his children, she lives for a brief period as an outcast, though she does reconcile with both Philip and Lucy. When the flood comes, Maggie sets out in one of Bob’s boats to rescue Tom, and together they head to rescue Lucy, but their boat capsizes and the two drown in an embrace, thus giving the book its Biblical subtitle, “In their death they were not divided.”
    I have always liked Eliot’s Silas Marner because it is, in the final analysis, a tale of redemption. However, The Mill on the Floss is not primarily a tale of redemption. In fact, the book is somewhat autobiographical in that it reflects the disgrace that the author herself felt while involved in a lengthy relationship with a married man, George Henry Lewes, although there are differences. No actual immorality is portrayed in the book, and towards the end, Maggie does make the right choice. Biblical quotations and allusions abound throughout, but I am not sure that the book represents a truly Biblical worldview. Many of Eliot’s observations about the nature of people and society are interesting, with some of which you may agree and others you may not, but occasionally her social commentary goes on and on to the point of becoming boring. Like The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, in the right hands The Mill on the Floss could be used to teach a good lesson on not being judgmental, but due to the “titillating” nature of the story I would recommend that it not be inflicted on anyone under age eighteen.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2001

    irony of fate as in everyday life! isn't it?

    'wild and natural'maggie always trying to be right but falls in some crises and the last of all her misfortunes is most drastic.its tragedy and irony.it shows that what fate does to a man is not in his power to change.but its a lovely story with tinges of bitterness here and there and the end is extremely tragic,one can't anticipate in the gloom of hopelessness any ray of hope,but it came certainly and removed all the earthly sorrows and miseries at last.in my thinking the end should be like this and i compare thier death to the end of all misfortunes.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2000

    I agree that Eliot Wimped out

    I was somewhat disappointed with this book. Maggie is frustratingly helpless, and Tom is an inflexible hypocrite. Although I realize that women had little power in Victorian times, Maggie is extremely passive. She doesn't do ANYTHING! Things simply happen to her. Eliot could have changed that during the end, but Maggie just floats along, like she was pretty much doing all her life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)