The Mill on the Floss (Large Print): (George Eliot Masterpiece Collection)

The Mill on the Floss (Large Print): (George Eliot Masterpiece Collection)

3.9 20
by George Eliot
     
 

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A wide plain, where the broadening Floss hurries on between its green banks to the sea, and the loving tide, rushing to meet it, checks its passage with an impetuous embrace. On this mighty tide the black ships-laden with the fresh-scented fir-planks, with rounded sacks of oil-bearing seed, or with the dark glitter of coal-are borne along to the town of St. Ogg's,

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A wide plain, where the broadening Floss hurries on between its green banks to the sea, and the loving tide, rushing to meet it, checks its passage with an impetuous embrace. On this mighty tide the black ships-laden with the fresh-scented fir-planks, with rounded sacks of oil-bearing seed, or with the dark glitter of coal-are borne along to the town of St. Ogg's, which shows its aged, fluted red roofs and the broad gables of its wharves between the low wooded hill and the river-brink, tingeing the water with a soft purple hue under the transient glance of this February sun. Far away on each hand stretch the rich pastures, and the patches of dark earth made ready for the seed of broad-leaved green crops, or touched already with the tint of the tender-bladed autumn-sown corn. There is a remnant still of last year's golden clusters of beehive-ricks rising at intervals beyond the hedgerows; and everywhere the hedgerows are studded with trees; the distant ships seem to be lifting their masts and stretching their red-brown sails close among the branches of the spreading ash. Just by the red-roofed town the tributary Ripple flows with a lively current into the Floss. How lovely the little river is, with its dark changing wavelets! It seems to me like a living companion while I wander along the bank, and listen to its low, placid voice, as to the voice of one who is deaf and loving. I remember those large dipping willows. I remember the stone bridge.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781499624632
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
05/20/2014
Edition description:
Large Print
Pages:
512
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 1.03(d)

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Mill on the Floss 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The story though sad and gloomy is addictive at the same time. I could not keep my eyes off the pages through a larger part of the story. I read with much intrest the passages used to describe subtle emotions. Undoubtedly, George Eliot has complete mastery to communicate feelings with as much ease as leisure talk. The similies are superb, and when combined with the feeling of finding some part of the novel corresponding with your own views, makes one wonder with amazement over the fact that the novel written so long ago could hold true even today.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Geoge Eliot's rhetoric prowess is beyond ones speculation. The scenic depiction of the medival England adds elegance to this peice of marvel. The changing instinctions of a girl to woman is portrayed very elegantly and reveals the subtle difference in the attitudes which diffrentiates a woman from girl. Maggie is such a philanthrophic heart which a man strives to have as his beloved. The Tom Boyish 'Tom' is portrayed eqaully well. The noble 'Philip Wakem' exhibits those qualities which portrays a perfect gentleman. It is quite hard to beleive this peice of literature as a fiction. No wonder George Eliot is one of the greatest writers this world has ever seen... No wonder artists are born and not made...
Guest More than 1 year ago
George Eliot has a way of making life appear magical and despairing at the same time. Maggie Tulliver suffers tremendous trials and greivances yet everyone can't help fall in love with her. She leads a pitiable, confused life , yet she is filled with such passion for it(life) that she never once gives up despite all of the burdens she is forced to carry. Overall- a glorious story of the conflicts between love and loyalty, passion and responsibiltiy, luxury and reputation. It's one of those books that you know needs to be shared but you can't help wanting to keep it's sparkle all to yourself. (At least thats the way I feel) The only tragedy for me was that it ended; it was really long but I just wanted it to go on and on forever. Call me sentimental, but wouldn't this make a great movie? Really! When you're done reading the book, E-amil me and help me write a script...
Guest More than 1 year ago
'wild and natural'maggie always trying to be right but falls in some crises and the last of all her misfortunes is most drastic.its tragedy and irony.it shows that what fate does to a man is not in his power to change.but its a lovely story with tinges of bitterness here and there and the end is extremely tragic,one can't anticipate in the gloom of hopelessness any ray of hope,but it came certainly and removed all the earthly sorrows and miseries at last.in my thinking the end should be like this and i compare thier death to the end of all misfortunes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was somewhat disappointed with this book. Maggie is frustratingly helpless, and Tom is an inflexible hypocrite. Although I realize that women had little power in Victorian times, Maggie is extremely passive. She doesn't do ANYTHING! Things simply happen to her. Eliot could have changed that during the end, but Maggie just floats along, like she was pretty much doing all her life.
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
Maggie Tulliver, who is age seven when the story opens, lives at Dorlcote Mill on the River Ripple at its junction with the River Floss near the village of St. Ogg’s in England, with her father, who owns the mill, mother, and older brother Tom. The novel spans a period of ten to fifteen years, beginning with Tom’s and Maggie’s childhood and including her father’s ongoing battles with a lawyer named Wakem, the Tullivers’ consequent bankruptcy resulting in the loss of the mill, and Mr. Tulliver’s untimely death. Tom has been in school with Philip Wakem, the lawyer’s hunchbacked, sensitive, and intellectual son, and Maggie has grown fond of Philip, seeing him secretly. To help repay his father’s debts, Tom leaves his schooling to enter a life of business, but in his hatred of the Wakems, he forbids Maggie’s seeing Philip, and she languishes in the impoverished Tulliver home, renouncing the world after reading Thomas à Kempis’s The Imitation of Christ. Some years later, Tom has been successful and able to restore the family’s former estate. Lucy has been away teaching school but returns to visit with her cousin, Lucy Deane. Her acquaintance with Philip is renewed and he still loves her, but Stephen Guest, a young socialite in St. Ogg's who is Lucy’s fiancé, is also attracted to her. Maggie enjoys the clandestine attentions of Stephen, but when he substitutes for the sick Philip in taking her on a boat ride and proposes that they stop in Mudport, and get married, she rejects him and makes her way back to St. Ogg's, where, rejected by her brother Tom and almost everyone else except her mother, Tom’s friend Bob Jakin and his family, in whose home she takes lodgings, and the minister, Dr. Kenn, who engages her as governess for his children, she lives for a brief period as an outcast, though she does reconcile with both Philip and Lucy. When the flood comes, Maggie sets out in one of Bob’s boats to rescue Tom, and together they head to rescue Lucy, but their boat capsizes and the two drown in an embrace, thus giving the book its Biblical subtitle, “In their death they were not divided.” I have always liked Eliot’s Silas Marner because it is, in the final analysis, a tale of redemption. However, The Mill on the Floss is not primarily a tale of redemption. In fact, the book is somewhat autobiographical in that it reflects the disgrace that the author herself felt while involved in a lengthy relationship with a married man, George Henry Lewes, although there are differences. No actual immorality is portrayed in the book, and towards the end, Maggie does make the right choice. Biblical quotations and allusions abound throughout, but I am not sure that the book represents a truly Biblical worldview. Many of Eliot’s observations about the nature of people and society are interesting, with some of which you may agree and others you may not, but occasionally her social commentary goes on and on to the point of becoming boring. Like The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, in the right hands The Mill on the Floss could be used to teach a good lesson on not being judgmental, but due to the “titillating” nature of the story I would recommend that it not be inflicted on anyone under age eighteen.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the very sad story of a young woman, Maggie Tulliver,who lives in a small English village. She must choose between her family and the man she loves. She is very unhappy because she does not know what to do.
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