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Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation
     

Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation

4.8 5
by Neil Howe
 

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By the authors of the bestselling 13th Gen, an incisive, in-depth examination of the Millennials--the generation born after 1982.

In this remarkable account, certain to stir the interest of educators, counselors, parents, and people in all types of business as well as young people themselves, Neil Howe and William Strauss provide the definitive

Overview

By the authors of the bestselling 13th Gen, an incisive, in-depth examination of the Millennials--the generation born after 1982.

In this remarkable account, certain to stir the interest of educators, counselors, parents, and people in all types of business as well as young people themselves, Neil Howe and William Strauss provide the definitive analysis of a powerful generation: the Millennials. Having looked at oceans of data, taken their own polls, talked to hundreds of kids, parents, and teachers, and reflected on the rhythms of history, Howe and Strauss explain how Millennials have turned out to be so dramatically different from Xers and boomers. Millennials Rising provides a fascinating narrative of America's next great generation.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The phrase "kids these days" is infused with new meaning in this look at the generation born between 1982 and 2000. Arguing against the conventional wisdom that junior high and high school kids are disrespectful, violent and alienated, Howe and Strauss (Generations; 13th Gen) demonstrate that the children of boomers and of older members of Generation X are actually harder workers and better community builders than any generation since the G.I.s'. "Millennials," the authors argue, are different from Gen-Xers: they have grown up in a multicultural country and have never known a recession; they are wanted children (as the increase in both birth control and fertility drugs demonstrate); and protected by an unprecedented number of child-centered laws. Since birth, they have been spurred to achievement in the home, by yuppie parents, and at school, by standardized tests and "zero tolerance" disciplinary measures. The authors show how easily Millennials have swallowed all the efforts on their behalf. School uniforms, as well as uniform-like Gap and Abercrombie & Fitch clothing, are popular. Teen sex is less frequent, and virginity seems to be a cool new trend. Howe and Strauss run into a bit of trouble when they insist that each generation corrects the mistakes of the previous one. They also attempt to link Millennials to the G.I. generation, suggesting that "hero generations" come in cycles. Despite these stabs at pop sociology, this well-substantiated demographic and cultural overview of the teen landscape is intriguing and highly amusing. Charts, graphs, cartoons. (Sept.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
KLIATT
This book and the ones before it (Generations and 13th Gen) have received a great deal of publicity, as have their authors and the authors' ideas of seeing the history of America in a series of generations. Whether or not you accept this way of looking at history, if you are a teenager today or work with them, this study of the current generation—the oldest of whom turned 18 in the year 2000—has its fascinating moments. The authors make the point over and over, citing studies and polls, that the Millennials are a nurtured generation, slightly conservative, trustworthy, hardworking, cooperative, dependable. Crime is down; teenage pregnancy is lower; volunteerism is up, and so on. This is a generation akin to the one that faced the Depression and WW II with determination and courage. They are the children who have known about computers all their lives, who have grown up in good economic times, with parents who take parenting very seriously. So, now the book is in paperback; it is about as thorough a study of this group of young people that we are likely to get. KLIATT Codes: JSA—Recommended for junior and senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2000, Random House/Vintage, 415p, illus, notes, 23cm, 00-034949, $14.00. Ages 13 to adult. Reviewer: Claire Rosser; January 2001 (Vol. 35 No. 1)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307557940
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/16/2009
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
573,394
File size:
12 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

William Strauss and Neil Howe originally coined the term “Millennial Generation” in 1991 and wrote the pioneering book on this generation, Millennials Rising, in 2000. They are also the authors of Generations: The History of America's Future and 13th-GEN, and write and lecture frequently on generational issues. Strauss is the cofounder and director of the Capitol Steps, a political cabaret. Howe, an historian and economist, is a senior adviser for the Concord Coalition. They both live in the Washington, D.C., area.

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Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Smiley-in-the-Sunshine More than 1 year ago
This book has prompted many lively and revealing discussions in our household. The one millenial in our family uses it as a touch-point to jumpstart dialogue about generational differences. We, the parents, use it as a means to find out what's on our child's mind and how he perceives the world and his place in it. Would highly recommend it to a family who reads and wants to share ideas.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
loves2readJE More than 1 year ago
As Millenials become a more active generation in our country its interesting to see the impact they are making as they enter in to the world of adulthood.