Millicent Min, Girl Genius

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"The funny and vulnerable Millicent Min springs fully to life through reader Keiko Agena's warm, sensitive reading. In a summer of change, girl genius Millicent hides the fact that she's in high school in order to pass as a regular 11-year-old. She's convinced this is the only way she'll ever have a real friend. At her mother's insistence, she's on a volleyball team, but her ineptness is humiliating. Her best buddy, eccentric Grandma Maddy, is leaving for England. Worst of all, Millicent suspects her mother has a terminal disease. This audiobook

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2003 Audio Book Good Four reliable audio cassettes in the case withdrawn from the library. Library markings to the sturdy audio tapes. Some shelf wear and scuff to the box. ... Enjoy this unabridged audio performance! Read more Show Less

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Overview

"The funny and vulnerable Millicent Min springs fully to life through reader Keiko Agena's warm, sensitive reading. In a summer of change, girl genius Millicent hides the fact that she's in high school in order to pass as a regular 11-year-old. She's convinced this is the only way she'll ever have a real friend. At her mother's insistence, she's on a volleyball team, but her ineptness is humiliating. Her best buddy, eccentric Grandma Maddy, is leaving for England. Worst of all, Millicent suspects her mother has a terminal disease. This audiobook is delightful in every way--characters, language, wisdom, and humor. Narrator Agena fully inhabits the heroine, making it a pleasure to spend time with both of them." --AudioFile

In a series of journal entries, eleven-year-old child prodigy Millicent Min records her struggles to learn to play volleyball, tutor her enemy, deal with her grandmother's departure, and make friends over the course of a tumultuous summer.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
An 11-year-old breezes through high school and college classes, but when it comes to making friends her own age, she's at a loss. "Readers don't have to share the heroine's IQ to empathize with the genius narrator of this energetic first novel," wrote PW in a starred review. Ages 9-12. (Sept.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Millicent Min is an atypical eleven-year-old girl who doesn't like boys, nail polish, stuffed animals, shopping, sports, or Stanford Wong, her archenemy. She is also taking a college poetry course the summer before her senior year in high school! Millicent is a genius, and her parents are proud, but they feel that she is missing her childhood. In an effort to help Millicent act like a preteen, her mother and best friend/grandmother, Maddie, enroll Millicent in a summer volleyball team and then volunteer her to tutor Stanford Wong. Millicent's last summer in Rancho Rosetta, California may be one that she will never forget. She has to tutor her nemesis, play on a volleyball team full of beautiful girls who hate her, and deal with her grandmother's move to another city. On top of all this, she thinks her mother is dying. With a summer like that, who needs the school year? But if Millicent will just stop analyzing her life and live it, she may find out that being a preteen volleyball player is as much fun as being a preteen genius. Lisa Yee uses the diary of a girl as the format for this novel. Her use of language allows readers to believe that they are reading the diary of a young girl, while the details remind the reader that the young girl is a genius. Yee's use of slang and simple English establishes a connection between Millicent and the reader. This mixture of language helps to show the reader the different dimensions of Millicent. Even though she has the brain of a genius, Millicent still has the heart of a child. 2003, Arthur A Levine Books, Ages 9 to 12.
—Michelle Wade
VOYA
At the tender age of eleven, Millicent Min has completed her junior year of high school. Summer school is Millie's idea of fun, so she is excited that her parents are allowing her to take a college poetry course. But Millie soon concludes that college is "just like high school, only bigger." Even in a college classroom, she is far more earnest and dedicated than any of the other students, and she is still regarded as an oddball. Meanwhile her mother signs her up for volleyball "to give her a more normal and well-rounded childhood." Although Millie is a klutz on the volleyball court, there she meets Emily, who shares her dislike of sports. Fearing to lose this first real friend, Millie lies to Emily about her academic genius. Eventually Millie's deceptions catch up with her, and she is forced to apply herself to something other than homework: learning how to become a true friend. The tension between Millie's formal, overly intellectual way of expressing herself and her emotional immaturity makes her a very funny narrator. Millie's obsession with book learning goes far beyond the stereotypical studiousness of Asian Americans. Her laid-back father, artistic mother, and wise, warm-hearted grandmother all encourage Millie to put down her books and broaden her interests. Fellow Chinese student Stanford Wong prefers basketball to schoolwork, and mutters to Millie, "Because of you, teachers expect every Chinese kid to be a genius." Readers considerably older than Millicent's eleven years will enjoy this strong debut novel. VOYA Codes 4Q 4P M J (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to9). 2003, Arthur A. Levine/Scholastic, 248p., Ages 11 to 15.
—Walter Hogan
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-Millie, an 11-year-old with a genius IQ, is taking a college poetry class and waiting for her high school senior year. Because she never hesitates to show how much she knows about a particular subject, her peers tend to stay away. Millie's social ineptitude is a cause of concern for her parents. Against her will, she is enrolled in summer volleyball and enlisted to tutor Stanford Wong, a friend of the family. Into this mix enters Emily, a volleyball teammate and typical preteen. The girls become friends but Millie neglects to tell Emily about her genius status. Eventually the truth surfaces and Emily feels betrayed. Millie thinks that Emily is angry because she is smart, never realizing that the betrayal comes from her lack of trust in their friendship. While some readers will have trouble identifying with Millie, her trials and tribulations result in a story that is both funny and heartwarming. A universal truth conveyed is that honesty and acceptance of oneself and of others requires a maturity measured not by IQ but by generosity of spirit.-Sharon Morrison, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Durant, OK Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
From Yee's first sentence-"I have been accused of being anal retentive, an overachiever, and a compulsive perfectionist, like those are bad things"-this perfectly captures the humor, unique voice, and dilemma of Millicent Min, its wunderkind heroine. For while there is no doubt that Millicent, an 11-year-old entering 12th grade, is a genius, her social and athletic skills leave something to be desired. In an effort to ameliorate the situation, her parents sign her up for a girls' volleyball league. There Millicent meets Emily, a potential friend, and to seem more normal decides to lie about her academic ability. Comic complications multiply when Millicent's parents induce her to tutor the son of a family friend, who also likes Emily and is delighted to let her think that he's the one doing the tutoring. Funny, charming, and heartwarming, with something to say about the virtues of trust and truth telling, this deserves an A. (Fiction. 9-13)
From the Publisher

Voice of Youth Advocates
(June 1, 2004; 0-439-42519-0)

At the tender age of eleven, Millicent Min has completed her junior year of high school. Summer school is Millie's idea of fun, so she is excited that her parents are allowing her to take a college poetry course. But Millie soon concludes that college is "just like high school, only bigger." Even in a college classroom, she is far more earnest and dedicated than any of the other students, and she is still regarded as an oddball. Meanwhile her mother signs her up for volleyball "to give her a more normal and well-rounded childhood." Although Millie is a klutz on the volleyball court, there she meets Emily, who shares her dislike of sports. Fearing to lose this first real friend, Millie lies to Emily about her academic genius. Eventually Millie's deceptions catch up with her, and she is forced to apply herself to something other than homework: learning how to become a true friend. The tension between Millie's formal, overly intellectual way of expressing herself and her emotional immaturity makes her a very funny narrator. Millie's obsession with book learning goes far beyond the stereotypical studiousness of Asian Americans. Her laid-back father, artistic mother, and wise, warm-hearted grandmother all encourage Millie to put down her books and broaden her interests. Fellow Chinese student Stanford Wong prefers basketball to schoolwork, and mutters to Millie, "Because of you, teachers expect every Chinese kid to be a genius." Readers considerably older than Millicent's eleven years will enjoy this strong debut novel.-Walter Hogan.

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books November 2003
'I have been accused of being anal retentive, an overachiever, and a compulsive perfectionist,' says Millicent, 'Eke those are bad things.' To her, correctness, achievement, and perfection are the joys of life, and since she's already out of step with her peers as an eleven-year-old finishing her junior year, those characteristics are pretty much the nails in her social coffin. Her parents are determined that she develop some friends of her own age, so to this end they sign her up for summer volleyball; there she's surprised to find herself embarked on a genuine friendship with garrulous and inclusive Emily, but she's unwilling to reveal the truth about her academic achievements to her new friend. While the book deals head-on with the efich@ of the Asian-American genius (Millicent resentfully tutors a Chinese- American age-mate who feels her perpetuation of the stereotype only makes his life harder), there are quite a few other clich@s in untrammeled operation: Millicent has the ulcers of many fictional accelerated kids, she understands just about every- thing except for the responses she engenders, she misconstrues her mother's physi- cal change as illness when it's really pregnancy. The portrayal of Miflicent and Emily's growing friendship is cheerful and plausible, howewr; less cheerful but also believable is Millicent's bewilderment when finahy facing something-vollcy@ ball-that she has to work to master and her unhappy discovery that college (she's taking a summer class) isn't the shortcut to easy human interaction she'd hoped ('It is a cruel joke on me then that college is just like high school, only bigger'). The depictions of'Millicent's affectionate parents and her loving and eccentric grandmother refreshingly reject stereotypes of both Asian-American farniues and showboating relatives of gifted children. The 'genius" notion may hook readers, but it's the sympathetic depiction of universal trials that will keep them reading. DS

Publishers Weekly
(November 10, 2003; STARRED)

Readers don't have to share Millicent Min's IQ to empathize with the 11-year-old genius narrator featured in this energetic first novel. Millicent breezes through high school and college classes, but when it comes to m

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807219317
  • Publisher: Random House Audio Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 6/1/2004
  • Format: Cassette
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author


Lisa Yee’s novels include Millicent Min, Girl Genius; Stanford Wong Flunks Big-Time (an ALA Notable Book); the first Bobby book, Bobby vs. Girls (Accidentally); and most recently WARP SPEED. She lives in South Pasadena, California, with her family. Please visit her website at www.lisayee.com.
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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 37 )
Rating Distribution

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(23)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 27, 2012

    A fun read!

    Millicent Min, Girl Genius, is the debut novel of Lisa Yee. It is the story of an 11 year old girl who is finishing her junior year of high school. She decides to take a college course over the summer and also ends up tutoring a boy named Stanford, whom she has known her whole life and does not like. She doesn't have any friends until a new girl moves in the neighborhood named Emily. Millicent hides her genius from Emily because she thinks that Emily will not want to be her friend if she knows she is a genius. Also, Millicent's mother signs her up for volleyball to try and help Millicent feel more like a kid, something that Millicent feels is not needed. Thus ensues the very interesting summer of Millicent Min.

    Lisa Yee did a great job on her debut novel. Writing about an 11 year old in high school would see impossible to make realistic, but I feel that Lisa did a great job of bringing life to Millicent Min. The reader begins to see that being a genius may not be all its cracked up to be.

    I recommend this book for kids of all ages. It can help them see through the eyes of someone who is "different" and maybe gleen a better understanding that being different can be okay.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Good:-)

    I enjoyed this book. It's comical yet serious. Lisa Yee kept me in depth theoughout the entire book. I would recommend this to friends and relatives between the ages of 9-13. It is also a good book if you are a volleyball fan.

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  • Posted September 26, 2011

    High IQ Is A Pain

    This book is about an 11 year old girl name Millicent. She is only 11 years old and has a really high IQ for her age. She's 11 and going to senior year in high school. AH-MAZING! She had no friends,well except for one but that didn't turn out to well. The only friends she used to have was her grandma. She found a friend but she messed up. She didn't tell her the truth. I think Millicent is awesome and highly confident and happy with the life she lives so she's like a star in my world. I loved this book because it was so descriptive and it was written in diary form. It seemed like a real person something that happens in real life and not just a story in a book. You should read this book. its AWESOME and it just shows to say that sometimes when you don't tell someone something maybe its not because of the content but because of the fact that you didn't tell them.

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  • Posted September 26, 2011

    This book is very interesting and it can relate to people.

    This book Girl Genius is about having a bad summer and her High school students hate her for setting the curve

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  • Posted July 22, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Easy to relate to

    Lisa Yee makes Millie easy to relate to, so through her bad mistakes, friendship, and lies, you stick with her and root her through it the whole time. This book can relate to the every day life of a pre-teen (which is why it's so easy for them to relate to it), and so can the writing style, and the voice of this book. I read this book a few years ago, and it was so memorable, I'm still in love with it! The author's writing style also contributes to the quality of this book, and makes it flow easily. This book is definitely a must read for people looking to stop worrying about their lives, or just plain relax and have a good read. I recommend this book to all ages! This book is so great, I feel as though I still didn't do it justice in describing how great it was.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2008

    girl geniouse gets 4 stars!!

    this book ia great and is really focused on kids around 9-13. since i am 12 i can relate to what milli is going through with her social problems. the author did a great job with this book and a highly recomend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2008

    READ THIS BOOK!!!!

    11 year old Millicent Min is in high school, and is taking a college class. In this book the author tells a story about a young girl who knows just about everything. She¿s tutoring, playing volleyball, and other things her mom is making her do to be more social. The author does a marvelous job of grasping the readers, around the ages of 10-14, into the book. The author, Lisa Yee, carefully wrote this book so pre-teens and young adults could comprehend it. She made the information easy to understand, but some of the content has some big words in it to express the main characters thoughts and feelings. Because the author uses a serious and realistic tone, readers could make this book seem like everyday life. She also uses a little bit of humor. Some of the chapters may seem a little boring at first because of the tone and emotions from that author. Though this book has great sentence structure, it still has some words that you may not know. This book is presented fairly. It includes plenty of information, even the exact date and place. It is organized very well. She also stays on topic which is a great thing to do. Readers will love this book and may also relate to some of the characters and events. It teaches a lesson to young readers. The lesson is that you should treat everybody the same no matter how smart or dumb they are.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2008

    8th graders loved the book!

    My 8th grade s loved this book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2008

    Super Good!!!!

    Millecent Min is such a interesting book and i felt a little bad for her at times too.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2008

    Millicent Min Review

    This is the best book i have read!! it compares to what it feels like to be left out which i have felt and it is very funny and exciting, keep making more of these kinds Lisa Yee!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2008

    GREAT BOOK!

    this book is great! i read it in my 5th grade class and loved it! i would recommend it to 10-12 year olds.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2007

    Very Good

    I loved this book, after I started reading it, I couldnt put it down! I recommend this book to mostly kids 4-7, and even 8. A really, really good book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2007

    Awsome!

    I read this when I was in fourth grade! I loved it so much!!! Well I think it is ment to be for 4 th grade through 7th grade! I t is one outstanding book! I loved it then and I still love it now! It is one of my favorite books!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2007

    A Good Book For Girls 9-12

    This book was great.I read it about a year ago.It's nice to see a book out there about a girl who is smart because these days it's all about romance and fashion in books.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2006

    OUT STANDING!!!

    This book is really good. You should buy it!!!!!! I read it for my bookclub, after that I urge my mom to buy it for me... Now i read it over and over again... BUY IT!!! IT IS WORTH YOUR MONEY!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2006

    Honest Opinion!

    This book was original in its own way. For some weird reason, most young readers should be able to relate to an 11-year-old genius. Millicent Min is definitely a memorable character. For every difference she has, there's a similarity. She may have skipped middle school, but she still struggles to make friends. She may have appeared on Jay Leno, but she still gets embarrassed when her grandma does karate in front of her class. Although there wasn't the bucket-load of suspense or action that most of us enjoy, there was a touching story with a special character. I loved this book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2006

    This book is AWESOME!

    Millicent wasn't worried what other people thought which makes her soo outstanding!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2006

    ~Kats Opinion~

    I think this book would interest the minds of a 5th,6th,or7th grader. Millicent Min is an 11 year old genius, who just finished her junior year in high school. During her summer she takes a college poetry summer class just for fun. Her parents then enroll her on a volleyball team, because they have been told that Millie has to enjoy her childhood and not keep her face stuffed in books or homework. So when she goes to volleyball practice she meets a girl named Emily. She doesnt want to tell Emily her IQ because then she thinks she would think shes a 'GEEK'. So Millie has to lie to her 'BEST' friend,enjoy volleyball, study for school, and take the advice from her friend/grandmother, Maddie.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2006

    Pefect Book for Determined Kids

    I adored this book! It was slightly far-fetched, but very classy and fun. I can relate to both Emily and Millicent and I think the characters were well written! A must read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2006

    A reviewer

    This book had no action whatsoever, and the made a mountain out of a molehill just to create conflict. Usually a book about anyone under age 13 isn't interesting for people older than that because it has no romance, and the characters had childish ways that we couldn't relate to, so this book is for young readers.

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