Million-Dollar Throw
  • Million-Dollar Throw
  • Million-Dollar Throw

Million-Dollar Throw

4.3 223
by Mike Lupica
     
 

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What would you do with a million dollars, if you were 13? Nate Brodie is nicknamed “Brady” not only for his arm, but also because he’s the biggest Tom Brady fan. He’s even saved up to buy an autographed football. And when he does, he wins the chance for something he’s never dreamed of—to throw a pass through a target at a Patriots… See more details below

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Overview

What would you do with a million dollars, if you were 13? Nate Brodie is nicknamed “Brady” not only for his arm, but also because he’s the biggest Tom Brady fan. He’s even saved up to buy an autographed football. And when he does, he wins the chance for something he’s never dreamed of—to throw a pass through a target at a Patriots game for one million dollars. Nate should be excited. But things have been tough lately. His dad lost his job and his family is losing their home. It’s no secret that a million dollars would go a long way. So all Nate feels is pressure, and just when he needs it most, his golden arm begins to fail him. Even worse, his best friend Abby is going blind, slowly losing her ability to do the one thing she loves most—paint. Yet Abby never complains, and she is Nate’s inspiration. He knows she’ll be there when he makes the throw of a lifetime. Mike Lupica’s latest sports novel is also his most heartwarming.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In 2005, an army veteran won $1 million by throwing a football through a target during a halftime show at a college football game. Lupica (The Big Field) inserts a 13-year-old in the contestant role and moves the action to Massachusetts, where QB Nate Brodie stars for his eighth-grade team and idolizes the New England Patriots' Tom Brady. The pressure to win is intense—Nate's father has lost his job, the house is close to foreclosure, and his best friend, Abby, needs money to go to a special school since she is rapidly going blind. Though the entire cast is a bit too perfect, many kids will relate to Nate's fears about his family's finances: “You were going along, having what felt like a pretty cool life, and then all of a sudden came the economy trying to wreck everything.” The ups and downs of Nate's peewee football team provide sports play-by-play, but the thread that will pull readers through is whether Nate can save his and Abby's families with one well-aimed spiral on Thanksgiving night. Ages 10–up. (Nov.)
Booklist
Lupica injects plenty of suspenseful sports action into the plot and creates a cast of uniformly likable characters whose faith in teamwork and in each other ultimately earns handsome rewards for all.
VOYA - Dave Goodale
Eighth-grader Nate "Brady" Brodie is one of professional quarterback Tom Brady's biggest fans. Nate also plays quarterback, and when he wins the chance to throw one pass for a million dollars during halftime at a New England Patriots game, his entire life changes. Suddenly Nate feels a tremendous amount of pressure, and his own play on the football field is adversely affected. In addition, Nate's family is in financial trouble and his parents must take on second jobs. He also faces the prospect of his best friend Abby going blind. Nate must learn to deal with the circumstances that surround him without being weighed down by the pressure to succeed. Instead of burdening himself with the throw and asking, "Why me?," Nate decides to change the question to "Why not?" Bestselling author Lupica stays within his sports fiction niche and provides another solid addition to the genre. The game descriptions are typical Lupica, but the plots that develop away from the field are what make this book special. The possibility of the Brodie family losing their home provides a very current backdrop to the story. Lupica keeps the tension high as the million-dollar throw approaches and surprises the reader with a heartwarming decision at the end of the story. Through Nate, Lupica explores the themes of believing in yourself and handling pressure, issues faced by many teens. Teens who love sports fiction or Lupica's other books will find this book a rapid, enjoyable read. Reviewer: Dave Goodale
Children's Literature - Jody J. Little
Thirteen-year old Nate Brodie loves the game of football. On his eighth grade team, he is the quarterback—just like his idol, Tom Brady of the New England Patriots. When Nate wins the opportunity to make a million dollars by throwing a football through a twenty-inch hole at halftime of the Patriot's Thanksgiving Day game, he becomes an instant celebrity. But as the time approaches for his million-dollar throw, Nate's world begins to crumble. His father loses his real estate job, forcing him to work at a sports store and put their home up for sale. His best friend Abby is quickly losing her eyesight to a disease Nate does not understand, and suddenly Nate cannot seem to make a pass on the football field. He loses his starting quarterback position. Even as things get worse and worse for Nate and Abby alike, his friend supports him and gives him strength to believe in himself. By the day of Nate's million-dollar throw, his confidence has been restored. He meets Tom Brady and, in front of a packed stadium, his parents and Abby, Nate spirals the ball through the hole. Author Lupica's sports writing skills are evident in his football game scenes; however, the young characters feel older than thirteen, and the optimism of the adult characters is often unbelievable. Nevertheless, sports fans will enjoy this well-plotted, fast-paced, touching story. Reviewer: Jody J. Little
School Library Journal
Gr 6–8—Lupica delivers another smooth, well-paced, character-driven novel. Thirteen-year-old Nate Brodie's life would seem to be the stuff of adolescent boys' dreams: he is the star quarterback of his school football team and has a great relationship with his best friend and soulmate, Abby McCall. However, all is not smooth sailing. The Brodies are in danger of losing their home in the economic downturn, and Abby's eyesight is failing due to a rare congenital disease. Nate thinks he may have the opportunity to solve all of his problems when he wins the chance to make a million dollars by throwing a football through a small target during halftime at a pro football game. Unfortunately, his quarterbacking skills suddenly and mysteriously desert him just as he is preparing for his big moment. With the support of his family and friends, he fights his way back and regains the confidence he needs to face the challenges in his life. While the serious issues raised about the effects of economic uncertainty on families are resolved a tad too easily, youngsters are likely to accept this as just a good, entertaining read.—Richard Luzer, Fair Haven Union High School, VT
Kirkus Reviews
No matter how complicated things get, Nate Brodie, 13, can always count on the power and accuracy of his football arm. Until, suddenly, he can't, just when he's won the opportunity to score $1,000,000 if he can throw a football through a 20-inch hole during the televised halftime break at a Patriots game. Normally, this feat, though difficult, would be within his remarkable abilities, and he would find fun in the challenge. But tension has been building for a while, sapping his confidence, and his arm is really showing it. The recession has taken a toll on the Brodies, and Nate's family, now in financial distress, could really use the money. Nate is also upset because his adored best friend Abby is rapidly going blind. Sadly, Abby is both a perfect and perfectly unbelievable character, and the scenes with her are mawkish and icky. Still, Lupica's football action engages, and his delineation of the athlete's thought process and emotional highs and lows of competition feels visceral and real. (Fiction. 10 & up)
From the Publisher
Praise for Million-Dollar Throw:
 
“Lupica's football action engages, and his delineation of the athlete's thought process and emotional highs and lows of competition feels visceral and real.” –Kirkus Reviews

“Lupica explores the themes of believing in yourself and handling pressure. Teens who love sports fiction . . . will find this book a rapid, enjoyable read.” –VOYA
 
“Lupica injects plenty of suspenseful sports action into the plot and creates a cast of uniformly likable characters whose faith in teamwork and in each other ultimately earns handsome rewards for all. A natural for graduates of Matt Christopher's sports stories.” –Booklist         

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399246265
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
11/03/2009
Pages:
244
Sales rank:
429,606
Product dimensions:
9.20(w) x 6.28(h) x 0.93(d)
Lexile:
960L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1
 
This was always the best of it for Nate Brodie, when he felt the slap of the ball in his hands and began to back away from the center, when he felt as if he could see the whole field, and football made perfect sense to him.
 
Sometimes when you were thirteen nothing seemed to make sense, and the world came at you faster and trickier than flying objects in a video game.
 
It was never like that for him in football.
 
Never.
 
Nate had been having more and more trouble figuring out his world lately, especially with everything that had been happening to his family. School was school—he tried hard, but there were times he just felt lost, in search of answers that wouldn’t come.
 
And no matter how hard he tried, how hard he could try, he was never going to make sense out of what was happening to his friend Abby.
 
But on a Saturday morning like this, underneath all the sun and blue sky, with the guys in the line already into their blocks and Nate feeling as if he had all day to throw the ball—feeling that weird calm he always felt in the pocket—he had all the answers.
 
Football was like this for Nate Brodie.
 
As he scanned the field now, he recognized one of those answers he instinctively knew. Pete Mullaney, his favorite receiver, was about to break into the clear. Once he did that, Nate knew Pete was going to run all day.
 
When it was just Nate and Pete and some of the other guys on the team playing touch football in the empty lot next to Nate’s house, they called this play “Hutchins-and-Go.” One day Nate had told Pete to fake toward the Hutchins’ house, the one on the other side of the lot, fake like he was running a sideline pattern in that direction, and then, as soon as the guy covering him bit, Pete was supposed to plant his outside foot and spin and take off down the sidelines.
 
The play had just always been called Hutchins-and-Go after that.
 
Nate watched as Pete sold his fake now, sold it like he was selling candy, didn’t rush, even turned and looked back for the ball. That was when the defensive back on him committed, turned, and looked for the ball himself.
 
Only Pete was gone.
 
And the ball wasn’t coming, at least not yet.
 
Now it was just a question of what kind of throw Nate wanted to make. Because with the kind of arm he had—his buds and teammates always called him “Brady,” knowing that Tom Brady was Nate’s all-time favorite player—there were a couple of ways he could go. Nate could put a lot of air beneath the ball, really hang it up there and let Pete use those jets of his to run under it. Or Nate could gun one right now, throw one of those dead spirals that was the same as one of his football fastballs, put so much sting and hurt at the end of the pass that Pete sometimes said he wished he was allowed to wear a catcher’s mitt.
 
Nate decided to put this one way up there.
 
Moon shot.
 
He rolled to his right now, feeling pressure coming from his left, a right-handed quarterback’s blind side, without actually seeing it. But just to make sure, to know exactly how much time he had, he shot a quick look over his shoulder and saw that the
Hollins Hills’ nose tackle had cleared Malcolm Burnley, Nate’s center and the best blocker Valley had, on an outside route and was coming hard, thinking he might have a shot at getting his first sack of the day.
 
Nate knew he didn’t.
 
In no hurry, Nate kept moving toward the sideline, toward the Valley bench, almost feeling as if he were floating. Having cleared the pocket completely, a nice patch of open green waited for him a few yards in front of Coach Rivers.
 
He stopped now, planting, making sure to square his shoulders so he didn’t drop his arm angle and sidearm the ball, setting himself on his back foot, carrying the ball high. The throwing mechanics that Coach said you pretty much had to be born with.
 
And he let the ball rip.
 
Knowing that the cornerback who had been covering Pete was never going to catch up with him and that the Hollins Hills safety had no chance of getting over to the sideline in time.
 
He watched the ball like it was on a string, like one of those perfect casts his dad used to make across the water when the two of them still had time to go fishing together, before his dad began working all the time.
 
He hoped his mom was getting this on the video recorder that was on its last legs and had been for a while, because his dad—working a double shift on Saturdays now—wasn’t here to see it in person.
 
The ball came down into Pete Mullaney’s hands, Pete in perfect stride, just crossing the Hollins Hills 10-yard line.
 
Pete pressed the ball to the front of his white uniform with those sure hands of his and crossed the goal line. Then he turned and just tossed the ball to the referee, because if you played on a team with Nate Brodie, if he was the one throwing you the ball, you knew enough not to do some kind of crazy touchdown dance afterward.
 
You could be happy, just not happy enough to show the other team up.
 
Nate was running down the sideline now, almost as fast as Pete just had. All the things that were confusing about his thirteen-year-old life lately—the things that made him sad and just plain mad once he got away from a football field—Nate had left them all in his dust.

By the time Nate got to Pete, the little wide receiver was on the Valley sideline, waiting for him with his arms stretched wide. Nate, taller than Pete by a whole helmet, grabbed him, picked him up, put him down just as quickly, as much celebration as he was going to allow himself, mostly because there was still some game left to play.
 
Pete said, “That throw was legit.”
 
“You always say that,” Nate said.
 
“No, Brady, this time I really mean it. That throw was, like, righteous.”
 
Nate laughed now, couldn’t help it. “I had the wind behind me.”
 
Pete Mullaney shook his head, smiling from behind his face mask. “Dude,” he said, “as far as I can tell, your arm is pretty much where the wind starts.”
 
Nate ran over to Coach Rivers then, to get the play Coach wanted them to run on the conversion. Then he ran back on the field and told his teammates he was faking to LaDell and then taking it in himself, on a roll to his left.
 
Nobody touched him. Valley was up 22–7. They all knew the game was over, even with the clock showing two minutes, straight up, left.
 
He and Pete ran off the field together, knowing that the forty-yarder they’d just hooked up on had put this one in the books.
 
When Nate got back to the bench, Coach Rivers gave him a simple handshake.
 
“A Brady throw all the way,” he said.
 
“I wish,” Nate said.
 
“I’m serious,” Coach said. “Biggest throw of the season.”
 
For now, Nate thought.
 
For now.

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What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Praise for Million-Dollar Throw:
 
“Lupica's football action engages, and his delineation of the athlete's thought process and emotional highs and lows of competition feels visceral and real.” –Kirkus Reviews

“Lupica explores the themes of believing in yourself and handling pressure. Teens who love sports fiction . . . will find this book a rapid, enjoyable read.” –VOYA
 
“Lupica injects plenty of suspenseful sports action into the plot and creates a cast of uniformly likable characters whose faith in teamwork and in each other ultimately earns handsome rewards for all. A natural for graduates of Matt Christopher's sports stories.” –Booklist         

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