Millions, Billions, and Trillions

Overview

What does a million look like? A billion? A trillion? These huge numbers are hard to visualize. This book explains quantities in terms children can understand. For example, one million dollars could buy two full pizzas a day for more than sixty-eight years, it would take the heads of ten thousand people together to have one billion hairs.

This dynamic math duo explains the concepts of millions, billions, and ...

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Overview

What does a million look like? A billion? A trillion? These huge numbers are hard to visualize. This book explains quantities in terms children can understand. For example, one million dollars could buy two full pizzas a day for more than sixty-eight years, it would take the heads of ten thousand people together to have one billion hairs.

This dynamic math duo explains the concepts of millions, billions, and trillions in a lighthearted way.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Math book veterans Adler and Miller put giant numbers into perspective by using familiar frames of reference and by appealing to readers’ imaginations: “How many ice cream sundaes would one billion dollars buy? At five dollars a Sunday, you could buy one thousand sundaes every day for more than five hundred years.” Real-world examples (New York City has a population of over eight million people) combine with more fanciful ways to conceptualize these quantities (“One trillion dollars would make a stack about seven hundred miles high”), and Miller’s eye-popping digital cartoons help make these intimidatingly massive numbers more digestible. And for those up for even more of a mental challenge: an author’s note tackles quadrillions, quintillions, and sextillions. Ages 6–10. (Mar.)
School Library Journal
Gr 3–5—Adler does a wonderful job of helping school-age children understand the concept that a million is a heck of a lot. He begins his explanations with things that children know. For example, he asks how many slices of pizza a million dollars would buy and tells readers they could acquire two entire pizza pies every day for 68 years. Grounding their thinking in something they already know helps youngsters begin to understand the enormity of the number. Similarly, he describes one billion in terms of how many hairs are on a typical human's head. One hundred thousand! If you gathered together ten thousand people you would have about one billion hairs. Trillions are difficult to imagine, and the book gives an example a good shot. Knowing that it is virtually uncountable is all that any of us needs to know. Miller's clean, clear digital graphics are lively and colorful, adding an extra bit of fun to the presentation. The book is perfectly suited to elementary students, who are able to think conceptually, and their foundational knowledge of math will help them make the leaps they will need to take to understand millions, billions, and trillions. For curious children who find numbers intriguing, this book is right on the money.—Joan Kindig, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA
Kirkus Reviews
Adler endeavors to get a grip on the slipperiness of big numbers. Adler, along with Miller and his cut-out–style, cartoony artwork, has delivered on all manner of math, to the delight of those who turn into deer-in-the-headlights when confronted with numbers (Perimeter, Area, and Volume, 2012, etc.). Here they take a stab at wrapping young heads around millions and billions and beyond. The book starts out with "One million is a lot. It's one thousand thousands," but words aren't enough. You have got to visualize. A million is the number of sugar granules in a quarter-cup measure. Spill them out on a piece of construction paper and take a gander. One million. They try to keep the mood upbeat, counting sundaes (with a billion dollars, "[a]t five dollars a sundae, you could buy one thousand sundaes every day for more than five hundred years") or birthday parties--but they throw in the towel on a grace note and a reprieve: "You couldn't count to a trillion." There are also a couple of bracingly sly jabs: "Someone with one billion dollars could give away ten million dollars every year for one hundred years." Listen up, you 1 percent. An abbreviated tour from quadrillion to sextillion is followed by the deflating news that "names for large numbers are not the same everywhere. In some parts of the world, what we call a billion is called a milliard," but by now we have come to suspect these big numbers are pretty crazy creatures. Adler anchors great numbers in cool facts, but once past a billion, the zeroes are still helplessly dizzying. (Informational picture book. 6-10)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780823424030
  • Publisher: Holiday House, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/1/2013
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 591,565
  • Age range: 6 - 10 Years
  • Lexile: AD720L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.60 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.50 (d)

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