Milo: Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze
  • Milo: Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze
  • Milo: Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze
  • Milo: Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze
  • Milo: Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze
  • Milo: Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze
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Milo: Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze

4.1 39
by Alan Silberberg
     
 

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MILO is the funny and poignant story, told through text and cartoons, of a 13-year-old boy’s struggle to come to terms with the loss that hit the reset button on his life. Loveable geek Milo Cruikshank finds reasons for frustration at every turn, like people who carve Halloween pumpkins way too soon (the pumpkins just rot and get lopsided) or the fact that the… See more details below

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Overview

MILO is the funny and poignant story, told through text and cartoons, of a 13-year-old boy’s struggle to come to terms with the loss that hit the reset button on his life. Loveable geek Milo Cruikshank finds reasons for frustration at every turn, like people who carve Halloween pumpkins way too soon (the pumpkins just rot and get lopsided) or the fact that the girl of his dreams, Summer, barely acknowledges his existence while next-door neighbor Hilary won't leave him alone. The truth is – ever since Milo's mother died nothing has gone right. Now, instead of the kitchen being full of music, his whole house has been filled with Fog. Nothing’s the same. Not his Dad. Not his sister. And definitely not him. In love with the girl he sneezed on the first day of school and best pals with Marshall, the “One Eyed Jack” of friends, Milo copes with being the new kid (again) as he struggles to survive a school year that is filled with reminders of what his life “used to be."

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Alan Silberberg has written an astounding illustrated novel that deals with the loss of a parent. Milo’s feelings are real and raw, and he’s busy coping with trying to be in 7th grade, while sorting out needing a parent who is no longer there. Alternately hilarious and heartbreaking, readers will effortlessly be drawn to Milo and his friends and family. This is not simply a book about losing a parent…it is a pitch perfect story of being in middle school, the push/pull of need and independence, and the story of a boy."
--Welcome to my Tweendom blog
Children's Literature - Patricia Williamson
Milo is a young adolescent who has already endured more than most of us endure in our lifetime and yet maintains his sense of humor and perspective throughout his existence. Milo's mom has died and his life is not the same as it used to be but he fiercely holds on to the things that make sense to him. The book is filled with Milo's story from his point-of-view and smattered with comic style graphics that add to the story he is telling you, giving you insight into his very personal thoughts and feelings. This book is overflowing with humor and great insight into the mind of a typical adolescent as he traverses the road to adulthood and tries to discover how his individualism fits in the peer related world of school while traveling the road of isolationism from his father who is trying to figure out his own grief and a sister who is "doing her best." Milo spends the novel telling you the story and revealing his stories that are memories of a mom he dearly misses. An approaching teen reader will instantly identify with Milo and feel what he feels, even if never having experienced the situation in which Milo finds himself. Some memorable characters include Milo's secret love, Summer and his best friend Marshall. Reviewer: Patricia Williamson
School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—By page 14, readers will know that this is more than just another funny story about a middle school misfit who is the new kid in the neighborhood. While Milo does struggle with all the normal tween anxieties and self-consciousness about his family, there is more. Silberberg details the daily events with Wimpy Kid-like drawings and quick-witted humor that will keep the pages turning. Milo's new friendships with classmates Marshall and Hillary and elderly neighbor Sylvia Poole allow readers to glimpse at the deeper truth—Milo's mother's death—as it emerges between laugh lines. Silberberg takes on a tough topic and always stays true to the age of the character through dialogue and artwork while maintaining that wisecracking, 12-year-old humor. Added to this, he manages to convey Milo's pain and fears without ever becoming maudlin or depressing. Those familiar with Silberberg's Pond Scum (Hyperion, 2005) will recognize the similar style of writing. Yet with Milo, the author embraces a core childhood fear, molding the humor with poignancy to create a profound slice of one boy's life.—Tina Hudak, St. Albans School, Washington, DC
Kirkus Reviews

Seventh grader Milo Cruikshank narrates and illustrates an up-and-down year in yet another new school. He works his way through a crush and finds both friends who share his interests and an adult he can talk to about the ways he still misses his mom, who died two years earlier. Looking at the cover and even reading the first two chapters won't prepare readers for the emotional content of this moving book. Milo's mother's death left a gaping, silent hole in his family. Over the course of the year he finds a way to fill that void, get his father and older sister talking about her again and say goodbye properly. The accessible text is full of cartoons illustrating and occasionally carrying the action; Milo makes lists, too. Close to failing math, socially inept and awkward with girls, even one who simply wants to be a friend, he is easy to care about. Middle-school readers will find his school life familiar and painfully funny, but they may be surprised by the poignancy of his story. (Fiction. 10-14)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416994305
Publisher:
Aladdin
Publication date:
09/14/2010
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
1,381,830
Product dimensions:
8.76(w) x 11.28(h) x 1.00(d)
Lexile:
NC1180L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt


gesundheit

SUMMER GOODMAN NEVER KNEW WHAT hit her. That’s because it was me, and as soon as I collided with her in the hallway—scattering every one of her perfectly indexed index cards—I disappeared into the mob of kids who’d arrived to help realphabetize her life.

I love Summer Goodman but she barely knows I exist, which I’m pretty okay with because when you love someone, they don’t have to do anything—and Summer does nothing, so I think it’s all going to work out great.

One possible problem is, I’ve never actually spoken to Summer, except the time I said “sorry,” which was after I sneezed on the back of her neck the first day in science class.

It was a really wet one—and she didn’t sneeze back on me or have me suspended, so that’s just another reason I think she’s so great.

What isn’t so great is that I’m the “new kid” again, which isn’t as bad as it sounds unless you think about how awful it is. That’s why I put all my focus on the more important stuff, like Summer Goodman and how my germs have actually bonded directly onto her skin!

The way I see it, surviving this year is all I have to do. Start to finish in one whole piece and then I win. Of course, being me, winning doesn’t come easy, which is why I created an alias, a supercool guy who will step in when I mess up or can’t talk or both.

Dabney St. Claire is mysterious, smart, and popular without even trying. I talk to him out loud sometimes, but mostly he’s just in my head, along for the ride, telling me how he’d do what I’m doing, only without doing it so wrong.

My sister thinks there’s something the matter with me, which is why she tells her friends I have a metal plate in my head, which would actually be a cool thing because then I would never have to fly on airplanes because my skull would set off alarms. Her friends always look at me with sad puppy-dog eyes, and even though I don’t have a metal plate or even a paper plate in my head, I stare back at them and speak my favorite language: SAPTOGEMIXLIKS.

This is just another reason my sister wants to move again.

© 2010 Alan Silberberg

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