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Mimi's First Mardi Gras

( 4 )

Overview

Mimi awakens on Fat Tuesday morning and hurries to a breakfast of hot beignets (French doughnuts). At the table, Mimi's parents explain Mardi Gras traditions such as king cake, and the observances of Ash Wednesday and Lent.
Afterwards, dressed in colorful costumes, they depart for a day of Carnival excitement and parade watching. Perched on her father's shoulders at the Zulu parade, Mimi watches the bustling crowd enjoying Mardi Gras. Shouts of "Throw me something, mister!" fill...

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Overview

Mimi awakens on Fat Tuesday morning and hurries to a breakfast of hot beignets (French doughnuts). At the table, Mimi's parents explain Mardi Gras traditions such as king cake, and the observances of Ash Wednesday and Lent.
Afterwards, dressed in colorful costumes, they depart for a day of Carnival excitement and parade watching. Perched on her father's shoulders at the Zulu parade, Mimi watches the bustling crowd enjoying Mardi Gras. Shouts of "Throw me something, mister!" fill the air as ornately-costumed krewe members toss trinkets, beads, and doubloons from atop the passing floats. Using her youthful ingenuity, Mimi uses her crown to catch some of the shower of treasures, souvenirs of "that special day which only comes once a year."
Alice Wilbert Couvillon and Elizabeth Butler Moore, authors of Louisiana Indian Tales and Mimi and Jean-Paul's Cajun Mardi Gras , are both native Louisianians who experienced the thrill of their own first Mardi Gras years ago and later relived that excitement through the eyes of their children'a sort of on-the-job training for writing Mimi's First Mardi Gras.
Illustrator Marilyn Carter Rougelot utilizes an active imagination and lively colors that capture the sights of Mardi Gras for Mimi, and all of us.

Mimi and her parents enjoy the color and excitement of Mardi Gras in New Orleans and observe many traditional aspects of the celebration.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Seen through Mimi's eyes, this pictorial tour of Mardi Gras in New Orleans provides a pleasing introduction to the holiday. Though the inclusion of abundant details may strike some as forced, readers can glean snippets of history and such traditions as the King Cake, a sizable confection with ``a tiny baby doll'' hidden inside. Preparations for the annual festivities include the all-important choices of costume; though her parents are dressing as clowns, ``Mimi had her heart set on being a beautiful princess.'' The depiction of the parade--with its gaudy carnival atmosphere--vividly highlights the Fat Tuesday food, the trinkets thrown to the crowd and the arrival of Rex, King of Carnival. When the parade is over, an exhausted Mimi joins her cousins for gumbo and jambalaya. While Rougelot's watercolor illustrations are not particularly distinctive, they manage to evoke the many facets of this timehonored extravaganza. Ages 4-8. (Jan.)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780882898407
  • Publisher: Pelican Publishing Company, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/1/1992
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 490,450
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.82 (w) x 11.28 (h) x 0.36 (d)

Meet the Author

Alice Couvillon and Elizabeth Moore are both Louisiana natives who reside in Covington and graduated from Newcomb College in New Orleans. Together they wrote the Pelican titles Mimiís First Mardi Gras, Mimi and Jean-Paulís Cajun Mardi Gras, and Louisiana Indian Tales.

Alice Couvillon and Elizabeth Moore are both Louisiana natives who reside in Covington and graduated from Newcomb College in New Orleans.

Illustrator Marilyn Carter Rougelot, who also provided the illustrations for Mimi's First Mardi Gras and Mimi and Jean-Paul's Cajun Mardi Gras as well as Portraits of Extraordinary Women, is a native New Orleanian. She began her art training in the city's Vieux Carr and is an accomplished painter specializing in portraiture.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

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(2)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2003

    Childhood's Rememberance of Mardi Gras

    Thru the eye's of a child, wonderful memories of the event are indeed magnified and impressionable! First Lady Laura Bush read this story to a class of Parisian children. Ideally, this book is a wonderful reference to share with children about how our regional customs do vary. The illustrations are beautifully depicted as one can just imagine how children celebrate the unique tradition of Mardi Gras.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2013

    a little disappointed, but pretty pictures!

    This is a cute story, but a child will struggle reading it on his own. I was hoping the vocabulary would be more "kid friendly" for my kindergarteners. It was also a little too lengthy to read aloud. I could only show them some of the pictures of Mardi Gras.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2010

    Horribly written

    I had purchased this book online with the intention of reading it to my elementary school students (K-4) as an introduction to Mardi Gras. However, after a few pages, I realized that it would not be appropriate for ANY grade level. The text was much too long-winded for the younger students, while the tone and ideas were appropriate for the younger students but would make the older students feel patronized. The narrative took many "explanatory" detours, and even I got lost trying to figure out what was important in the book. I promptly returned this book, and I would not recommend it to anyone. The one star I gave it were for the illustrations, which were quite pretty.

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  • Posted January 23, 2010

    Beautiful Children's Book

    My granddaughter fell in love with this book when we checked it out from our local library. She was crushed to learn that someone else had checked it out and not returned it last summer, so I was delighted to find it still available. While our family has never been to Mardi Gras, we both adored the story, and Marilyn Rougelot's lavish illustrations are truly works of art. It is clearly written for middle-school children, but even at 3 years of age, she found it enchanting.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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