Mind Your Manners, Alice Roosevelt!

( 4 )

Overview

Alice Roosevelt was an independent, outspoken young woman during a time when women were supposed to be conventional and reserved. Whether it was riding a pig, keeping a pet snake, or driving a car—and speeding!—Alice did what she wanted to. When her father told she had to obey his rules while she lived under his roof, Alice decided to spend her time on top of the roof! Readers will enjoy author Leslie Kimmelman's factual and affectionate look at a free spirit who caught the attention of a nation in the early ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (6) from $4.55   
  • New (4) from $10.28   
  • Used (2) from $4.55   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Alice Roosevelt was an independent, outspoken young woman during a time when women were supposed to be conventional and reserved. Whether it was riding a pig, keeping a pet snake, or driving a car—and speeding!—Alice did what she wanted to. When her father told she had to obey his rules while she lived under his roof, Alice decided to spend her time on top of the roof! Readers will enjoy author Leslie Kimmelman's factual and affectionate look at a free spirit who caught the attention of a nation in the early years of the twentieth century. Kimmelman juxtaposes Alice's antics with the achievements of her father—from his creation of our national parks system to his successful efforts at diplomacy—yet all the while, demonstrates a tender bond between the two. Adam Gustavson's illustrations perfectly capture the humor of the story and the strong personalities of its characters while placing the story within its proper historical context.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Kimmelman's (Everybody Bonjours!) picture-book biography of Teddy Roosevelt's daughter is as much about her father's accomplishments as it is about Alice's unruly behavior. The conversational narrative emphasizes that soldier, diplomat and politician Roosevelt “could handle almost anything,” be it governing the U.S. or international diplomacy. “But,” reads the book's repeated refrain, “Teddy Roosevelt didn't always know how to handle his oldest daughter, Alice,” who is shown jumping on the sofa, riding a pig and driving a speeding automobile. Speech balloons present Roosevelt's repeated admonishments of his rambunctious offspring, and the typeface is sometimes creatively arranged, as when it snakes across the page in a passage about Alice's pet snake. Gustavson (The Yankee at the Seder) adeptly captures the young woman's shenanigans—and her irrepressible spirit—in lifelike oil paintings that range from spot art to full-spread scenes and include some inventive perspectives. One scene shows her happily perched on a rooftop with a teacup and umbrella, and a view from above later spotlights the havoc the escaped snake creates in the White House. A lively, fictionalized portrait of a very independent girl. Ages 4–8. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Phyllis J. Perry
This picture book about Alice Roosevelt, the eldest daughter of Teddy Roosevelt, twenty-sixth president of the United States, is as much about the father as it is about the daughter. Many of the two-page spreads begin by telling what the president knew how to do and then contrasting this with his ineptitude at handling his daughter. Young Alice Roosevelt was difficult to raise, and because she was in the public eye, her independence and outspokenness drew attention to her. She was one of the first women in America to drive a car, and she drove it fast! The president was not happy when Alice carried around her neck (or in her pocketbook) her pet snake (named Emily Spinach) that sometimes escaped into various rooms in the White House. This large format book has lively and colorful oil-on-paper illustrations, and sometimes makes use of speech balloons and creative positioning of typeface. Readers will enjoy young Alice's antics, but this fictionalized account does not provide a strong historical context and does little to suggest any of the accomplishments of Alice Roosevelt as an adult. Reviewer: Phyllis J. Perry
School Library Journal
Gr 1–3—Kimmelman's story, ostensibly about the irrepressible Alice Roosevelt, is as much about her father and his accomplishments. Each spread opens with a statement about what Teddy can handle (sickness, fighting, the vice-presidency, diplomacy), faced with a page of what he can't handle (one of Alice's many antics), and followed by the admonishment, "Alice, mind your manners!" Gustavson's realistic oil-on-paper illustrations convey the period while capturing the humor and vivaciousness of the Roosevelts. The author does not provide readers with much historical context, however (Alice's behavior may not seem so outlandish today), and emphasizes Teddy's frustration and parental incompetence. Barbara Kerley's What to Do About Alice? (Scholastic, 2008) does a better job of conveying time and place and the president's appreciation of his daughter's individuality.—Lisa Egly Lehmuller, St. Patrick's Catholic School, Charlotte, NC
Kirkus Reviews
Despite the title, Kimmelman's book focuses primarily on Theodore Roosevelt and his achievements-as a frail child, a Rough Rider, governor, vice president and president-instead of his lively eldest child, Alice. While some of her exploits, particularly those involving her pet snake, Emily Spinach, are taken from history, others, such as Alice riding a pig or throwing a tantrum, are generic and possibly fictional. Shown one-dimensionally, Alice's antics come across as those of a spoiled child, and the ending-Alice getting married so "[h]er father didn't have to handle her anymore"-imparts a strange message of masculine control. No mention is made of the diplomatic trips Alice managed adroitly on her father's behalf or of her lifelong, intelligent passion for politics. Gustavson's action-filled paintings show the First Family from many interesting perspectives but don't contribute to plot or tension. Barbara Kerley and Edwin Fotheringham's Sibert Honor-winning What To Do About Alice? (2008) is the better choice. (Picture book. 5-8)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781561454921
  • Publisher: Peachtree Publishers, Ltd.
  • Publication date: 9/28/2009
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 689,178
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: AD700L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 9.70 (w) x 11.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 8, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Delightful introductory biography

    As 26th president of the United States, Teddy Roosevelt encountered many challenges in leading our nation. However, his first child, daughter Alice, was quite the handful. Obviously a precocious child full of high-strung energy, she was repeatedly involved in activities unlike those of her 1910 peers. She was most UN-lady-like. As President, Teddy Roosevelt managed to handle the affairs of State, but not the affairs of Alice. "Mind Your Manners Alice Roosevelt!" is a delightful introductory "biography" for a child into the life of a really interesting person. Teddy Roosevelt was a soldier, statesman, and president. He was able to bring peaceful settlement between nations at war with each other and he was an early environmentalist. But handling Alice was an entirely different matter. Alice was involved in activities that gentle women simply did not do. She drove an automobile and believed that women should enjoy equal rights as men. She liked pets and even had a pet snake. This short picture-biography about President Teddy Roosevelt and his daughter is based on actual stories about them and is beautifully and energetically illustrated by Adam Gustavson. Author Leslie Kimmelman has presented this introductory bio in an engaging manner that will make the young reader thirst for more to read about both Teddy and Alice Roosevelt. Recommendation: Great historical fiction picture book for the home or school library and for ages 7 to 9.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 22, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    America's most famous First Daughter

    Is this wonderfully illustrated childrens book, young readers can be introduced to one of the White House's most flamboyant residents, Teddy Roosevelt's irrepressable daughter, Alice. From smoking atop the White House to jumping fully clothed into a swimming pool, some of Alice's more famous escapades are portrayed in colorful illustrations, many two page spreads. The narrative moves right along as President Roosevrelt tries in vain to reign in his spirited offspring, and by the end of the book young readers, especially girls will learn just because your father is the Chief Executive, doesn't mean you can't be yourself.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)