Mind's Eye (Inspector Van Veeteren Series #1)

( 42 )

Overview

International Bestseller 

Håkan Nesser is firmly established as one of the world's bestselling crime novelists. And now the novel that introduced Chief Inspector Van Veeteren is available for the first time in English.

The swift conviction left Van Veeteren uneasy: Janek Mitter woke one morning with a brutal hangover and his wife dead in the bathtub. With only the flimsiest defense, he is found guilty and imprisoned in a mental ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$11.38
BN.com price
(Save 24%)$15.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (45) from $1.99   
  • New (12) from $8.33   
  • Used (33) from $1.99   
Mind's Eye (Inspector Van Veeteren Series #1)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

International Bestseller 

Håkan Nesser is firmly established as one of the world's bestselling crime novelists. And now the novel that introduced Chief Inspector Van Veeteren is available for the first time in English.

The swift conviction left Van Veeteren uneasy: Janek Mitter woke one morning with a brutal hangover and his wife dead in the bathtub. With only the flimsiest defense, he is found guilty and imprisoned in a mental institution. But when Mitter is murdered in his bed, Van Veeteren regrets not following his gut and launches an investigation into the two murders. As the chief inspector delves deeper, the twisted root of these violent murders will shock even him.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

World-weariness in a detective is well and good—but what if it ends up costing innocent victims their lives? That's the predicament in which Detective Chief Inspector Van Veeteren finds himself in this moodily affecting mystery, the first to appear in Nesser's native Sweden but the third to be published in the U.S. (after The Return and Borkmann's Point). Though the melancholy cop suspects accused killer Janek Mitter is innocent of drowning his new bride during an alcoholic blackout, Van Veeteren opts to focus on such more personally compelling matters as his own ruptured marriage and to let the judicial process run its course—until a second, truly shocking murder boots him and the book into high gear. The suspense intensifies as it becomes apparent that the initial killing was no garden-variety domestic drama but part of a bloody tapestry worthy of Greek tragedy. Even if you guess the book's final twist a bit early, this is a hauntingly powerful tale you won't soon forget. (June)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

When Janek Mitter wakes up from a night of too much alcohol and sex, he must break into the locked bathroom, where he finds his wife dead in the bathtub. Suffering from amnesia as a result of his drinking, he falls into a lethargic state that lasts throughout his murder trial, conviction, and imprisonment in a mental hospital. Detective Chief Inspector Van Veeteren launches a new investigation when Mitter is murdered. Finally being published in the United States, this 1993 noir crime novel, set against the bleak, cold backdrop of Maardam, Sweden, launched Nesser's popular police procedurals (The Return; Borkmann's Point). For readers of Henning Mankell and those who remember Per Wahlöö and Mai Sjowald. [See Prepub Mystery, LJ2/1/08.]


—Jo Ann Vicarel
Kirkus Reviews
Sweden's brilliant Detective Chief Inspector Van Veeteren solves a knotty puzzle-a little too late-in this first installment in the Van Veeteren series (The Return, 2007, etc.); two other volumes in the series have already been published in the United States. At some point during a wild, alcohol-fueled, orgiastic night, schoolteacher Janek Mitter murdered his wife and colleague. Or so the police quickly decide, acting on the law-enforcement truism that when the corpse is a spouse, you can give odds forever that the surviving spouse is guilty. In due course, Mitter is arrested, indicted, convicted and bundled off to spend the rest of his natural life in a mental institution. But the outcome doesn't sit well with near-legendary homicide cop DCI Van Veeteren, who, aware that things are seldom what they seem, squirms at the ease with which Mitter has been warehoused. Events bear him out when Mitter is murdered. Convinced that the two homicides are inextricably connected, and annoyed at his own weak-kneed response to the prodding of his celebrated instincts, Van Veeteren launches a much deeper investigation. It carries him back to the dark corners of some extremely complex lives before finally confronting him with a motive for murder that manages to shock even him. Amiable Van Veeteren is a sly, cocksure sleuth.
The Sunday Times (London)
“In a class of its own. . . . This stunning novel by one of Sweden’s foremost crime writers might have been written as a script for Alfred Hitchcock.”
The Sunday Times (London)
BookPage
“In a class of its own. . . . This stunning novel by one of Sweden’s foremost crime writers might have been written as a script for Alfred Hitchcock.”
The Sunday Times (London)
The Oprah magazine O
Mind’s Eye satisfies on every level. It is an intelligently written, cleverly plotted tale, populated with believable characters. . . . Nesser was superb right out of the gate.”
BookPage
From the Publisher
“Snappish, sardonic, unsentimental, depressed, and quite possibly psychic, Van Veeteren is the most appealingly unlovable hero since TV’s crabby physician House.”
O, The Oprah Magazine
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307387226
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 6/16/2009
  • Series: Inspector Van Veeteren Series , #1
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 191,447
  • Product dimensions: 5.17 (w) x 8.02 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Meet the Author

HÅKAN NESSER was awarded the 1993 Swedish Crime Writers’ Academy Prize for new authors for Mind’s Eye (published in Sweden as Det Grovmaskiga Nåtet); he received the best novel award in 1994 for Borkmann’s Point and in 1996 for Woman with Birthmark. In 1999 he was awarded the Crime Writers of Scandanavia’s Glass Key Award for the best crime novel of the year for Carambole. Nesser lives in Sweden and London.

SIMON VANCE is a prolific and popular audiobook narrator and actor with several hundred audiobooks to his credit. An Audie® Award-winner, Vance was recently named "The Voice of Choice" by Booklist magazine.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

He woke up and was unable to remember his name.

His pains were legion. Shafts of fire whirled around in his head and throat, his stomach and chest. He tried to swallow, but it remained an attempt. His tongue was glued to his palate. Burning, smoldering.

His eyes were throbbing. Threatening to grow out of their sockets.

It’s like being born, he thought. I’m not a person. Merely a mass of suffering.

The room was in darkness. He groped around with his free hand, the one that was not numb and tingling underneath him.

Yes, there was a bedside table. A telephone and a glass. A newspaper. An alarm clock.

He picked it up, but halfway it slipped through his fingers and fell onto the floor. He fumbled around, took hold of it again, and held it up, close to his face.

The hands were slightly luminous. He recognized them.

Twenty past eight. Presumably in the morning.

He still had no idea who he was.

...

He didn’t think this had happened before. He had certainly woken up and not known where he was. Or what day it was. But his name . . . had he ever forgotten his name?

John? Janos?

No, but something like that.

It was there, somewhere in the background, not only his name but everything. . . . Life and lifestyle and extenuating circumstances. Lying there waiting for him. Behind a thin membrane that would have to be pierced, something that had not woken up yet. But he was not really worried. He would know soon enough.

Perhaps it was not something to look forward to.

The pain behind his eyes suddenly got worse. Possibly the strain of thinking had caused it; but it was there, whatever. White hot and excruciating. A scream of flesh.

Nothing else mattered.

The kitchen was to the left and seemed familiar. He found the pills without difficulty; he was becoming increasingly sure that this was his home. No doubt everything would become clear at any moment.

He went back into the hall. Kicked against a bottle standing in the shadow cast by a bookcase. It rolled away over the parquet floor and ended up under the radiator. He shuffled to the bathroom. Pressed down the handle.

It was locked.

He leaned awkwardly forward. Put his hands on his knees to support himself, and checked the indicator on the door.

Red. As he’d thought. It was occupied.

He could feel the bile rising.

“Open . . .” he tried to shout, but could produce no more than a croak. He leaned his forehead against the cool wood of the door.

“Open up!” he tried again, and this time managed to produce the right sounds, almost. To stress the seriousness of his situation he belted several times with his clenched fists.

No response. Not a sound. Whoever was in there obviously had no intention of letting him in.

There was a sudden surge from his stomach. Or pos- sibly from even lower down . . . It was obviously a matter of seconds now. He staggered back along the hall. Into the kitchen.

This time it seemed more familiar than ever.

This is definitely my home, he thought as he vomited into the sink.

With the aid of a screwdriver he succeeded in unlocking the bathroom door. He had a distinct feeling that it was not the first time he’d done this.

“I’m sorry, but I really had to . . .”

He entered the room and just as he switched on the light, he became quite clear about who he was.

He could also identify the woman lying in the bathtub.

Her name was Eva Ringmar and she was his wife of three months.

Her body was strangely twisted. Her right arm hung over the edge at an unnatural angle. The well-manicured fingernails reached right down to the floor. Her dark hair was floating on the water. Her head was facedown, and as the tub was full to the brim, there could be no doubt that she was dead.

His own name was Mitter. Janek Mattias Mitter. A teacher of history and philosophy at the Bunge High School in Maardam.

Known informally as J.M.

After these insights he vomited again, this time into the lavatory. Whereupon he took two more tablets out of the bottle and telephoned the police.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 42 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 42 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2010

    Compelling Swedish detective fiction

    Readers of Henning Mankell's Wallander series or Per Wahlöö and Maj Sjöwall's Martin Beck series should enjoy this, the first of Håkan Nesser's Inspector Van Veeteren series. It runs in the same vein of police procedural, with a somewhat world-weary main detective, faced with a challenging case. In an unusual twist, the story starts with the suspect already in custody and runs from there. The novel is cleverly plotted, and keeps the reader engrossed, but there are also lighter moments of real humor as well. I've since gone on to read the second book in the series, Borkmann's Point, and look forward to reading the rest, which will hopefully continue to be translated in the coming years (this novel was originally written in 1993, but only translated into English in 2008).

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 10, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A mystery to savor

    I love this author. A Swede who is not quite as dark and depressing as some of the other Swedish authors, but true to the genre. I am reading the second in the series-"Borkmann's Point" and loving it even more. He has a trick of inserting little bits of wry humor into his books.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 24, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    MIND'S EYE is an excellent Swedish police procedural

    In Sweden the evidence overwhelmingly condemns drunken schoolteacher Janek Mitter in the killing of his wife and a colleague who apparently was with her. Detective Chief Inspector Van Veeteren arrests the distraught husband who has no alibi and was found in a drunken stupor at the crime scene; Janek is easily convicted and sent away to spend the rest of his life either in a mental institution or if his mind heals a prison.

    Van Veeteren has some issues with the conviction although it appears reasonable and he is a prime reason Janek was nailed. Although he keeps mentally reviewing the case making him bone weary, he does little to follow up on his hunch until it is too late. Someone murders Janek leaving Van Veeteren feeling guilty that he failed to follow his instincts. He vows to find the link between the homicides of the Mitter couple and subsequently their killer while personally vowing never to ignore his gut instincts ever again.

    MIND'S EYE is an excellent Swedish police procedural (see THE RETURN and BORKMANN'S POINT) starring a great investigator who is filled with remorse for not following up on his belief something was off kilter in the case even as he received acclaim for solving an obvious domestic dispute that turned ugly, but proved to be something else. Fans will enjoy this terrific tale as a good likable cop struggles with his mistake by chasing down the real culprit in a great twisting thriller.

    Harriet Klausner

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 31, 2009

    Another Scandinavian Winner

    Some very witty lines and sage observations. The detective is wise, but a bit off-putting with his ubiquitous toothpicks. The ending ties everything together in a neat, if shocking, package, but is somewhat reminiscent of Agatha Christie, i.e., not enough herrings (red or otherwise) to figure out the real cuprit till the end.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 8, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent read- I didn't figure out 'who done it'

    I watch lots of Scandinavian films and this book reads like one of those movies. Very bleak landscape, cold and dreary, lots of smoking and very gritty characters make a terrific story of murder. It's well worth your time and you won't figure this one out- James Patterson fans!

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 16, 2009

    Unusual mystery

    Terrific debut for series made famous by Borkmann's Point. Inspector Van Veeteren is an original character and the Scandinavian setting adds to the interest.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 22, 2013

    Outstanding crime novel; ranks with the best of the Nordics

    We have Steig Larsson, Jo Nesbo, Mankel's Wallander and now Hakan Nesser. What do they have in common? The characters are so well-drawn, not "complex" the way most reviewers use the word, but
    dimensioned, flawed at varying levels at varying times, and able
    to engage you as a person whose adventures are worth tracking.

    Van Veeteren is classic as hardboiled, opinionated (most of his
    observations on our society I share) but with enough stitches of
    his underlying virtues to show through.

    If Mind's Eye was a worthwhile read, then Beergman's Point is even better. Treat yourself to these compact reads in order.

    David Blocher

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2011

    If you like Sweedish mysteries give this one a try.

    I found Hakran Nesser's narritive completly different from those of Mankell, Lackberg, and Nesbo. If you are reading a series and need a quick change of pace this is the book for you. I enjoyed the characters. But most of all it was fun to read a book where you actively have to participate if figuring out whose character you are listening to and putting the pieces together, from your perspective and then seeing if you've got it right in the end.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2014

    Set in a generic European country

    I was wrong about Holland. The setting seems a mixture of Holland, Germany, Sweden, and Belgium.

    Good mystery, but not up to the literary standard of the best Wallander books.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 4, 2013

    A little Rex Stout, add some Agatha Christie and some more Henni

    A little Rex Stout, add some Agatha Christie and some more Henning Mankell!

    Inspector Van Veeteren is world weary and just too good at his job. His assistant thinks he looks like a half-finished stuffed animal, and he feels like it as well. There is howvever a multiple murder to solve and the inspector is the man to solve it. An elegant mystery plot and characters combine to create a great read. The dark Swedish atmospherics are there as well. The first in a great series.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 31, 2012

    On a quest to find and enjoy yet another Scandinavian mystery au

    On a quest to find and enjoy yet another Scandinavian mystery author, I'm thankful to a reading friend who introduced me to the first DI Van Veeteren mystery series.  These are psychological police procedurals of the first order.  They very much remind of the series by authors Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo.




    DI Van Veeteren chews on toothpicks while he thinks, and depends on his sense of intuition in discovering his suspects---solving 19 out of 20 cases with this assurance.  In this first case a viciously murdered wife is found dead in the same apartment as her husband, who has lost his memory of that evening.  He is promptly convicted and put in a mental institution, but something doesn't quit set with Van Veeteren.  He's intuition is proved correct when the husband is murdered in the mental hospital.




    The book continues with the process of finding the real murderer.  This 'process' definitely 'makes' this DI a winning character, and I can see why this author is so popular in his home country.  The translation is very good, and adds to the story.  Looking forward to reading lots more in this series from Sweden!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 13, 2012

    Really keeps you interested

    I love reading the Swedish authors. This is the first of Nesser's Van Veeteren series, but I intend to read more.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2014

    Maybe in swedish its better

    However since no one did anything and he got murdered anyway seems to have not been a very good police man and i didnt like anyone in the book especially the detective regionals should at least make you want to visit and trashing everything and everyone does not make you want anything more to do with the whole country the collective tourists org should ban these exports almost every present day regional combo mystery discourages reading more

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 42 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)