Mind's Eye: An Eye of the Beholder Collection

Mind's Eye: An Eye of the Beholder Collection

by Peter Kuper
     
 

Started as the first comic strip ever to run in the New York Times, this silent set of strips chronicles the world, its foibles, its intricacies, its dreams through the eyes of most anything you can imagine. Set up as visual puzzles, the trick is to figure out whose eyes they are before turning the page and seeing the final panel...In a beautiful small

Overview

Started as the first comic strip ever to run in the New York Times, this silent set of strips chronicles the world, its foibles, its intricacies, its dreams through the eyes of most anything you can imagine. Set up as visual puzzles, the trick is to figure out whose eyes they are before turning the page and seeing the final panel...In a beautiful small hardcover format.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Political cartoonist Kuper's "Eye of the Beholder" comic strip was the first ever to appear in the New York Times. The Times eventually stopped running it, but it continues to appear syndicated in papers around the country. In this 6x6 format volume, the second collection of the comic to be published, the five-panel, black and white strips appear as cleverly conceived, intricately drawn visual and perceptual puzzles. Often political in tone and subject, they always make a statement. The first four panels provide the clues from which you're challenged to figure out from whose perspective the scenes are viewed. The fifth panel, overleaf, reveals the answer. Images of women, with the focus on their clothed breasts, appear in one sequence. Who is so clearly (and inappropriately) obsessed with these women? Turn the page and discover that the voyeur is a baby, who tosses aside his bottle and reaches out for better fare. When these strips work, they're clever, honest and thoughtful. However, they can also be overly obvious and a too pious, prompting a cringe even from those who might agree with Kuper's message. Still, this is an ingenious little book, well worth adding to a comics collection. (Sept.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
School Library Journal
YA-These short stories offer a mix of the politically pithy, the humorous, the socially astute, and the purely imaginary. Each one is composed of four panels offering the view from a very particular subject's vantage point, followed by a page in which a single panel presents that subject. The topics include the demolition of a city as viewed in the conversation of two little boys with a small firecracker; the life stages of a frog as viewed by a young biology student confronted with the amphibian's flayed carcass; assorted white sunbathers working on tans while a black janitor mops under a "whites only" sign; and a haggard man and woman who, apparently, have been roused from sleep by the cheerful cries of a bouncing baby. The heavy black-pen illustrations mimic block cuts. The few words needed to get the full meaning of the visual riddles presented appear in signs or on objects. Body shape, age, physical ability, or economic status as depicted through visual clues, and the history of ethnic-group treatment are all used to inform the solutions to these riddles. Cultural awareness, rather than literary skill, is necessary to understand many of the concepts on which the vignettes turn. This text will find welcoming audiences among art-book browsers, comics enthusiasts, and short-story readers and writers.-Francisca Goldsmith, Berkeley Public Library, CA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Mind's Eye is the second 'Eye of the Beholder' collection, which began as the first comic strip to run in the New York Times, and provides a fine set of black and white strips which presents a particular viewpoint. These visual puzzles provide much food for thought: there are panels of scenes, then turn the page for the unifying concept linking them.
Kirkus Reviews
A regular contributor to magazines as diverse as Time and Mad, Kuper collects a second batch of his "Eye of the Beholder" cartoons, all in the same basic pattern: "four panels of clues to guess which point of view your eyes are following." The answer is on the next page in a single, larger frame. Fortunately, Kuper breaks the form with regularity. Not that he changes his panel pattern, but his mostly wordless, woodcut style cartoons don't strictly follow his dictum: some aren't literal points of view, some are imagined visual histories, and some are the desires of his hapless figures. Many of Kuper's visual puzzles are politically pointed, with the pay-off frame packing the punch of an editorial: four views of white people tanning are seen by a black janitor; various guns on a rack are ogled by a young boy; floating garbage is viewed by a mermaid; a defoliated forest is watched by Tarzan.The best comics are the most surprising ones: four different frames seen by, among others, a window washer, a crash-test dummy, a construction working using a jackhammer, and a new-born baby. Often the four views serve as a visual history, with the punch-line frame including the person visualizing the past: a hotel maid sees the various inhabitants of the room she's cleaning; a piece of gum on someone's shoe ends a sequence on the history of its manufacture. The wittiest pieces confound reality: a jar of pills views its consumer in various stages; a turkey flashes on its future as dinner; and the Grim Reaper surveys his victims. Kuper uses himself to great effect: circling sharks turn out to be the lawyers surrounding him at a table; trees being converted to wood productsendup in his hand as pencils; and, funniest of all, scenes of an empty bookstore are his views at a book-signing. Kuper's black-heavy style, best used in his narrative work, here deadens jokes that need air and light: he's a great talent who hasn't yet found a subject suited to his style. Smigel, Robert & Adam McKay X-PRESIDENTS Villard (76 pp.) paperback original Nov. 1, 2000

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781561632596
Publisher:
N B M Publishing Company
Publication date:
07/28/2000
Series:
The Eye of the Beholder Collection
Edition description:
Graphic Novel
Pages:
125
Product dimensions:
6.32(w) x 6.66(h) x 0.53(d)

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