×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Mine!
  • Alternative view 1 of Mine!
  • Alternative view 2 of Mine!
     

Mine!

by Sue Heap
 
From New York Times best-selling illustrator Sue Heap comes the perfect antidote for reluctant sharers everywhere.

Amy loves her blankie, her bear, her bunny, and her bird very much. "Mine!" she proudly crows. But what will happen when baby Joe and twins Zak and Jack want to join in and play too? Sue Heap’s joyful illustrations bring a

Overview

From New York Times best-selling illustrator Sue Heap comes the perfect antidote for reluctant sharers everywhere.

Amy loves her blankie, her bear, her bunny, and her bird very much. "Mine!" she proudly crows. But what will happen when baby Joe and twins Zak and Jack want to join in and play too? Sue Heap’s joyful illustrations bring a classic story of learning to share to vibrant life.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
09/01/2014
Heap (Danny’s Drawing Book) adds to the bookshelf of titles about kids struggling with sharing. In this case, the guilty party is a girl named Amy, who is very attached to her orange blanket. And her bear. And her bunny. And her bird. One can almost feel the hug Amy gives her three stuffed animals as Heap shows them sprawled out on the blanket. “I love you all,” she tells them, “because we’re together and because you’re MINE.” Reality quickly intrudes in the form of Amy’s twin brothers, who grab Bunny and Bear and “whirled and twirled them around and around,” and Baby Joe, who has a soft spot for Bird. Toy snatching and hurt feelings ensue, but Heap doesn’t make Amy suffer a dark night of the soul (or a parental scolding). Rather, she already knows what she needs to do, and she distributes the toys among her brothers. It’s perhaps an unrealistically rapid turnaround, but Heap’s naïve pencil-and-acrylics art expresses so much joy at the siblings’ reconciliation that some readers might just be tempted to see what happens when they share. Ages 2–5. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
Written in short sentences and heartfelt, childlike dialogue, this simple story strikes a chord that will resonate with young children who know that they should share but find it very difficult. Heap’s expressive artwork conveys an operatic range of emotions within the short space of a picture book. ... A strong read-aloud choice that many parents and caregivers will want to share.
—Booklist Online

Heap’s ... pencil-and-acrylics art expresses so much joy at the siblings’ reconciliation that some readers might just be tempted to see what happens when they share.
—Publishers Weekly

The illustrations, rendered in vibrant colored pencil and acrylic, have no background—only a simple horizon line, which keeps the focus on the characters. The human figures have sizable faces, emphasizing their expressions and emotions. Sharp-eyed readers will see that the toys themselves are troubled by the strife, and their smiling faces (and beaks) reflect their happiness when fair play resumes. ... Sweet, simple.
—Kirkus Reviews

Pleasing cartoon illustrations are large and soft, on plain white backgrounds. Text is minimal and printed in an easy-to-read font, which should be helpful for young readers.
—School Library Journal

School Library Journal
12/01/2014
PreS-K—Amy has difficulty sharing her toys, especially when her twin brothers take them and toss them around. But when Baby Joe tries to play with one of Amy's stuffed animals, the twins shame her for taking it away from him. Amy realizes that her little brother has no toys and instead of telling him that Bird is hers, she announces that it is "YOURS AND MINE." Pleasing cartoon illustrations are large and soft, on plain white backgrounds. Text is minimal and printed in an easy-to-read font, which should be helpful for young readers. Other books about sharing present the concept in a richer context, such as Anna Dewdney's Llama, Llama Time to Share (Viking, 2012) or Jane Yolen's How Do Dinosaurs Play with Their Friends (Scholastic, 2006). While Mine! does an adequate job with the concept, the story is a little flat.—Mary Hazelton, formerly at Warren & Waldoboro Elementary Schools, ME
Kirkus Reviews
2014-09-14
Playtime isn't easy when you have three toys and four kids—or is it? Amy is very attached to her blankie, Bear, Bunny and Bird. "I love you all," she tells them, "because we're together and you're MINE." Enter twins Zack and Jack to disturb her halcyon moment. "Can we play?" they ask, but without waiting for a definitive answer, they pick up Bear and Bunny and carelessly toss them in the air. Next, angry Amy engages the twins in a toy tug of war. Meanwhile, while no one is looking, Baby Joe has entered the scene, taking his place on Amy's blanket and scooping up Bird, which he squeezes and kisses. When Amy sees her toy has been confiscated, she snatches it away. Baby Joe stands small and alone on the page, eyebrows slanted upward in distress, smile turned to frown. The sight of the woebegone baby stops all three. "He's all alone…without a toy," the twins observe. Amy has the solution. The illustrations. rendered in vibrant colored pencil and acrylic, have no background—only a simple horizon line, which keeps the focus on the characters. The human figures have sizable faces, emphasizing their expressions and emotions. Sharp-eyed readers will see that the toys themselves are troubled by the strife, and their smiling faces (and beaks) reflect their happiness when fair play resumes. A sweet, simple addition to the parade of pedagogical books about sharing. (Picture book. 2-5)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763668884
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
10/14/2014
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,149,879
Product dimensions:
10.40(w) x 9.70(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
2 - 5 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews