Minigami: Mini Origami Projects for Cards, Gifts and Decorations

Overview

Step-by-step guide to 50 miniature origami projects.

Minigami is packed with great new origami designs using all the popular new forms of miniature origami such as tea-bag folding and Iris folding.

These...

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Overview

Step-by-step guide to 50 miniature origami projects.

Minigami is packed with great new origami designs using all the popular new forms of miniature origami such as tea-bag folding and Iris folding.

These unique modular forms can be used as:

  • Home accents
  • Decorative display pieces
  • Greeting cards
  • Gift tags
  • Decorations.

The book includes practical advice for choosing the right paper and also explains the standard folding symbols.

The projects range from those for absolute beginners to pieces for intermediate and advanced artists. Step-by-step instructions illustrated in color enable artists of any skill level to create almost any miniature design.

Minigami
is a fascinating craft that will challenge traditional origami enthusiasts.

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Editorial Reviews

San Diego Union-Tribune - Carole Pecora
50 great new miniature origami designs that encompass popular new forms such as tea bag folding, iris folding and modular origami.
Palm Beach Post - Lynn Kalber
Instructions are easy to follow. Gross is a well-known origami author and her books are always well done.
Parents Express
Chock full of clear step-by-step instructions... your child can make cards, gifts, decorations and more as they develop their dexterity and their abilities to follow instructions.
Jasmine - Jaclyn Law
This charming book will delight your inner crafter.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781554070916
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 6/6/2008
  • Edition description: Reprint Edition
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 1,448,444
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Gay Merrill Gross is an expert in origami and the related skill of napkin folding. She is the author of Origami: The Art of Paperfolding, The Art of Napkin Folding, Folding Napkins, Napkin Folds for Special Occasions and three introductory books on origami. She lives in New York City.

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Table of Contents

  1. Introduction Materials and Techniques
    • Papers and Symbols
    • Folding Techniques
    • How to Make and Equilateral Triangle
  2. Greeting Cards
    • Creative Folds for Cards
    • Mountain Landscape Card Fold
    • Reverse-fold Pop-up Card
    • Pleated Pop-up Card
    • X-cut Card with Frame
  3. Envelopes and Letterfolds
    • Easy Envelope
    • Rectangular Envelope
    • Fish Letterfold
    • Corner Pocket Letterfold
  4. Models for Cards
    • Simple Sailboat
    • Simple Heart
    • Tulip
    • Butterfly Corner Clip
    • Blossom
    • Stem with Leaves
    • Leaf
    • Twist Fish
    • Penguin
    • Duck
    • Purse
    • Santa
    • Hat
    • Party Dress
    • Two-tone Dress
    • Bow
  5. Modular Decorations
    • Rosette
    • Florette
    • Star Wreath
    • 8-Point Star
    • 6-Point Star
    • Button Flower
    • Button Flower Ornament
  6. Tatos and Paper Pockets
    • Layered Pocket
    • Surprise Package
    • Standing Pocket
    • Pleated Triangle
    • Pinwheel Tato and Toy
    • Flower Tato (2 versions)
  7. Folded Cards
    • Pinwheel Card
    • Leaf Notecard
    • Bird Card
    • Star Card
    • Flower Note

    Picture Index and Resources
    Acknowledgments


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Preface

Introduction

If you are new to origami, welcome to a wonderful world of clever paper creations, made from simple materials and the most basic of tools — your own two hands! The transformation of a sheet of plain paper into fanciful form is truly magical.

Origami is probably a lot easier to do than you might have imagined. As with learning anything new, a little patience and perseverance will serve you well. Here are some additional things to keep in mind when folding; even experienced folders may find useful tips here.

Learn the basics
Take a few moments to study and become familiar with the origami symbols, terms and techniques at the beginning of the book.

Start simple!
Each model is rated according to its level of difficulty for a beginner:

  • Simple
  • Low
    Intermediate
  • Intermediate
  • Challenging

If you are a beginner, start with the simplest models and work your way toward those that are a little more difficult. If you are an experienced folder, you should have no trouble with any of the designs, even those rated as challenging.

Practice paper
The first time you fold a model, think of it as practice. Usually your second and third attempts will come out much better. Use practice paper when learning a model; packaged origami paper, colored on one side and white on the reverse (see page 8), is excellent.

Point to point, line to line
Line up all edges am corners as carefully and precisely as you can. Make a soft fold to start with, check your alignment, make a slight adjustment if necessary then set your crease sharply. Good lighting is the key to folding neatly and precisely.

Sharp, flat folds
The flat surface of your fingernail is a great folding aid, even better for making neat folds than the edge of your nail. If you prefer to use a folding tool to sharpen your folds, you can purchase a bone folder, or use a less expensive alternative such as a tongue depressor or an old credit card.

Colorful contrast
It is a good idea to work on a smooth, dean, flat surface, especially when you are first learning origami. The color of the folding surface is also important. It is easier to line up edges and corners if the color of the folding surface contrasts with the color of both sides of the paper.

Look ahead to get ahead
When following origami diagrams, always look ahead to the next drawing; it will show you what you should be aiming for in the step you are working on.

Mountains are better guides
Mountain creases are easier to see, making them better guidelines than valley creases (see page 11).

Take a break
Perseverance and patience are very important when learning a new model, but if you get stuck on a step, frustration may hinder your progress. Take a break and come back to the model later. A fresh mind will often make the learning process a lot easier.

Practice!
Your first attempt at a model may go slowly as you work your way through the step-by-step instructions. If you repeat the same model right away, you will notice how much easier it is, and by your third try, you may be able to fold with little or no help from the instructions, plus your finished model will probably be a lot neater!

Note to readers
Important information on each model is provided on the colored side bars and at the end of each project. The creator of the origami fold has been provided unless it has a more complicated history, in which case "various" has been given. Information on the origin of each fold, whether from a traditional or more contemporary source, has been added when appropriate. Unless otherwise specified in a caption, all card designs are by the author.

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Introduction

Introduction

If you are new to origami, welcome to a wonderful world of clever paper creations, made from simple materials and the most basic of tools -- your own two hands! The transformation of a sheet of plain paper into fanciful form is truly magical.

Origami is probably a lot easier to do than you might have imagined. As with learning anything new, a little patience and perseverance will serve you well. Here are some additional things to keep in mind when folding; even experienced folders may find useful tips here.

Learn the basics
Take a few moments to study and become familiar with the origami symbols, terms and techniques at the beginning of the book.

Start simple!
Each model is rated according to its level of difficulty for a beginner:

  • Simple
  • Low Intermediate
  • Intermediate
  • Challenging

If you are a beginner, start with the simplest models and work your way toward those that are a little more difficult. If you are an experienced folder, you should have no trouble with any of the designs, even those rated as challenging.

Practice paper
The first time you fold a model, think of it as practice. Usually your second and third attempts will come out much better. Use practice paper when learning a model; packaged origami paper, colored on one side and white on the reverse (see page 8), is excellent.

Point to point, line to line
Line up all edges am corners as carefully and precisely as you can. Make a soft fold to start with, check your alignment, make a slight adjustment if necessary then set your crease sharply. Good lighting is the key to folding neatlyand precisely.

Sharp, flat folds
The flat surface of your fingernail is a great folding aid, even better for making neat folds than the edge of your nail. If you prefer to use a folding tool to sharpen your folds, you can purchase a bone folder, or use a less expensive alternative such as a tongue depressor or an old credit card.

Colorful contrast
It is a good idea to work on a smooth, dean, flat surface, especially when you are first learning origami. The color of the folding surface is also important. It is easier to line up edges and corners if the color of the folding surface contrasts with the color of both sides of the paper.

Look ahead to get ahead
When following origami diagrams, always look ahead to the next drawing; it will show you what you should be aiming for in the step you are working on.

Mountains are better guides
Mountain creases are easier to see, making them better guidelines than valley creases (see page 11).

Take a break
Perseverance and patience are very important when learning a new model, but if you get stuck on a step, frustration may hinder your progress. Take a break and come back to the model later. A fresh mind will often make the learning process a lot easier.

Practice!
Your first attempt at a model may go slowly as you work your way through the step-by-step instructions. If you repeat the same model right away, you will notice how much easier it is, and by your third try, you may be able to fold with little or no help from the instructions, plus your finished model will probably be a lot neater!

Note to readers
Important information on each model is provided on the colored side bars and at the end of each project. The creator of the origami fold has been provided unless it has a more complicated history, in which case "various" has been given. Information on the origin of each fold, whether from a traditional or more contemporary source, has been added when appropriate. Unless otherwise specified in a caption, all card designs are by the author.

Read More Show Less

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