Mining

Mining

by Jane Drake, Ann Love, Pat Cupples
     
 

This book in the Canada at Work series tells an informative and accessible story about the people, machines and environmental concerns surrounding mining in Canada.See more details below

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Overview

This book in the Canada at Work series tells an informative and accessible story about the people, machines and environmental concerns surrounding mining in Canada.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
The processes used to mine ore and fuels are discussed, as is what is being done to reclaim mining wastelands. The labeled pictures help younger children to follow along. This entry is colorful, descriptive, and detailed ?
Children's Literature - Sharon Salluzzo
Jamie and Trish, brother and sister, are going to play in the Junior Miners' Hockey Tournament. When Trish asks if steel for hockey skates comes from a factory, their mother and father begin to explain how steel is made. Fascinating and up-to-date information begins with the search for a mine site where the geologists take core samples from the earth. Readers will be intrigued by today's process of removing the minerals and metals from the mine. Comprehensible explanations are provided about the formation of fossil fuels, and how oil and gas are extracted. There is a discussion of pollution and the environmental changes caused by mining and drilling followed by a reminder to the reader to practice the "4 R's"--reduce, reuse, recycle and refuse. The last page shows a hockey rink and lists 24 items for the reader to find that are made from steel or oil. Nicely done and accessible, this is part of the "America at Work" series. Hockey creates a good "hook" to get the reader into this informational book.
Library Journal
Gr 2-4-In Mining, Trish and Jamie's upcoming hockey tournament prompts their parents to show them how the steel blades for ice skates are made. First they take a tour of mom's workplace, an underground mine shaft, and then of the steel mill where dad works. There, the children see how ore is changed into various usable metals, including stainless steel. The processes used to mine ore and fuels are discussed, as is what is being done to reclaim mining wastelands. In Fishing, Grandpa takes his granddaughter to his fish farm on the Maine coast. Readers learn about large trawlers that use underwater nets to catch fish as well as how they are hatched, grown, and sold. The girl then travels back to the West coast where her father, a fish and wildlife officer, describes his job and gives her a tour of nearby streams and rivers. Environmental issues such as overfishing are also discussed. While Drake and Love have chosen subjects and a format reminiscent of those by Gail Gibbons, the smaller text size, detailed explanations, and terminology in these two books are better suited to slightly older readers. The labeled pictures help younger children to follow along. These entries are colorful, descriptive, and detailed; the cheerful watercolor illustrations make otherwise dry subjects interesting.-Kit Vaughan, J. B. Watkins Elementary School, Midlothian, VA Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This America at Work entry features cartoon illustrations of a smiling family on a trip "out east" to a Junior Miners' hockey tournament. The mother works in a molybdenum mine, the father works in a steel mill, and parental offers to take their twins to work meet with great approval. Even readers unfamiliar with the series may surmise, rightly, that this is going to be a wordy ride through material that may or may not be useful in writing school reports. Cutaway charts intended to support the hackneyed premise do little to clarify the goings on in an underground mine; two miners in hard hats who are "making the roof safe," for example, shore up a shaft with what appear to be automatic weapons with tiny flying buttresses set on the shaft's floor. The topic-driven trip includes visits to a steel mill, an airplane ride, an oil well, a toxic dump, a picnic in a park that was once a coal pit, and ends in a hockey arena, with the kids asking all the right questions to keep the facts flowing. They count things made from steel or oil in an "interactivity" befitting the automaton-like nature of progeny who actually let their mother get away with lecturing, "At a smelter, the bits of molybdenum ore are heated and refined to form a powder of pure molybdenum." (index) (Picture book. 7-10)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781550749205
Publisher:
Kids Can Press, Limited
Publication date:
02/01/2001
Series:
Canada at Work Series
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

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