The Minister's Wooing [NOOK Book]

Overview

First published in 1859, Harriet Beecher Stowe's third novel is set in eighteenth-century Newport, Rhode Island, a community known for its engagement in both religious piety and the slave trade. Mary Scudder lives in a modest farmhouse with her widowed mother and their boarder, Samuel Hopkins, a famous Calvinist theologian who preaches against slavery. Mary is in love with the passionate James Marvyn, but Mary is devout and James is a skeptic, and Mary's mother opposes the union. James goes to sea, and when he is...
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The Minister's Wooing

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Overview

First published in 1859, Harriet Beecher Stowe's third novel is set in eighteenth-century Newport, Rhode Island, a community known for its engagement in both religious piety and the slave trade. Mary Scudder lives in a modest farmhouse with her widowed mother and their boarder, Samuel Hopkins, a famous Calvinist theologian who preaches against slavery. Mary is in love with the passionate James Marvyn, but Mary is devout and James is a skeptic, and Mary's mother opposes the union. James goes to sea, and when he is reported drowned, Mary is persuaded to become engaged to Dr. Hopkins.. "With colorful characters, including many based on real figures, and a plot that hinges on romance, The Minister's Wooing combines comedy with regional history to show the convergence of daily life, slavery, and religion in post-Revolutionary New England.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940029374462
  • Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1896 volume
  • File size: 747 KB

Meet the Author

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, daughter of the Reverend Lyman Beecher of the local Congregational Church. In 1832, the family moved to Cincinnati, where Harriet married Calvin Ellis Stowe, a professor at the seminary, in 1836. The border town of Cincinnati was alive with abolitionist conflict and there Mrs. Stowe took an active part in community life. She came into contact with fugitive slaves, and learned from friends and from personal visits what life was like for the Negro in the South. In 1850, the Fugitive Slave Law was passed, and that same year Harriet’s sister-in-law urged the author to put her feelings about the evils of slavery into words. Uncle Tom’s Cabin was first published serially during 1851-52 in The National Era, and in book form in 1852. In one year more than 300,000 copies of the novel were sold. Mrs. Stowe continued to write, publishing eleven other novels and numerous articles before her death at the age of eighty-five in Hartford, Connecticut.

Susan K. Harris is Joyce and Elizabeth Hall Distinguished Professor of American Literature at the University of Kansas.

Biography

Harriet Beecher Stowe was born on June 14, 1811, in Litchfield, Connecticut, to Lyman Beecher, a Calvinist preacher and activist in the antislavery movement, and Roxana Foote, a deeply religious woman who died when Stowe was four years old. Precocious and independent as a child, Stowe enrolled in the seminary run by her eldest sister, Catharine, where she received a traditionally "male" education. At the age of twenty-one, she moved to Cincinnati to join her father who had become the president of Lane Theological Seminary, and in 1936 she married Calvin Ellis Stowe, a professor at the seminary and an ardent critic of slavery. The Stowes supported the Underground Railroad and housed several fugitive slaves in their home. They eventually moved to Brunswick, Maine, where Calvin taught at Bowdoin College.

In 1850 congress passed the Fugitive Slave Law, prohibiting assistance to fugitives. Stowe was moved to present her objections on paper, and in June 1851 the first installment of Uncle Tom's Cabin a appeared in the antislavery journal National Era. The forty-year-old mother of seven children sparked a national debate and, as Abraham Lincoln is said to have noted, a war.

Uncle Tom's Cabin: Or, Life Among the Lowly met with mixed reviews when it appeared in book form in 1852 but soon became an international bestseller. Some critics dismissed it as abolitionist propaganda, while others hailed it as a masterpiece. The great Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy praised Uncle Tom's Cabin as "flowing from love of God and man." Stowe presented her sources to substantiate her claims in A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin: Presenting the Original Facts and Documents Upon Which It Is Based, published in 1853. Another antislavery novel, Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp, appeared in 1856 but was received with neither the notoriety nor the success of Uncle Tom's Cabin.

Stowe fueled another controversy in The True Story of Lady Byron's Life (1869), in which she accused the poet Lord Byron of having an incestuous love affair with his half sister, Lady Byron. She also took up the topic of domestic culture in works that include The New Housekeeper's Manual (1873), written with her sister Catharine. Stowe died on July 1, 1896, at age eighty-five, in Hartford, Connecticut.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of Uncle Tom's Cabin.

Good To Know

After its publication in 1852, Uncle Tom's Cabin sold more copies than any other book up to that point, with the exception of the Bible.

When it was becoming a sensation around the world, Uncle Tom's Cabin was smuggled into Russia, in Yiddish to evade the czarist censor.

Between 1853 and 1859, Stowe made several trips to Europe, and forged friendships with fellow writers George Eliot and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Christopher Crowfield
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 14, 1811
    2. Place of Birth:
      Litchfield, Connecticut
    1. Date of Death:
      July 1, 1896
    2. Place of Death:
      Hartford, Connecticut

Table of Contents

The Minister's Wooing

I Pre-Railroad Times 7

II The Kitchen 20

III The Interview 34

IV Theological Tea 46

V The Letter 70

VI The Doctor 87

VII The Friends and Relations of James 101

VIII Which Treats of Romance 118

IX Which Treats of Things Seen 135

X The Test of Theology 149

XI The Practical Test 165

XII Miss Prissy 178

XIII The Party 202

XIV Aaron Burr 208

XV The Sermon 229

XVI The Garret-Boudoir 239

XVII Polemics in the Kitchen 266

XVIII Evidences 276

XIX Madame de Frontignac 285

XX Tidings from Over Sea 298

XXI The Bruised Flax-Flower 307

XXII The House of Mourning 311

XXIII Views of Divine Government 318

XXIV Mysteries 336

XXV A Guest at the Cottage 358

XXVI The Declaration 382

XXVII Surprises 390

XXVIII The Betrothed 403

XXIX Bustle in the Parish 411

XXX The Quilting 420

XXXI An Adventure 438

XXXII Plain Talk 448

XXXIII New England in French Eyes 458

XXXIV Consultations and Confidences 466

XXXV Old Love and New Duty 479

XXXVI Jacob's Vow 488

XXXVII The Question of Duty 496

XXXVIII The Transfigured 510

XXXIX The Ice Broken 514

XL The Sacrifice 522

XLI The Wedding 528

XLII Last Words 538

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 10 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

    Digitized version has a lot of errors

    While I greatly enjoyed the story which is set in New England shortly after the American Revolution, this digitized version contains many typo errors which make reading difficult. There were some entire passages which were unradable strings of charachters.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2013

    Johnna

    *grabs a pepperoni pizz and heads to the tables*

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2013

    Wells

    Got pepperoni pizza

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2013

    PIZZA

    We got any pizza lovers?

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2011

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    Posted March 12, 2012

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    Posted June 14, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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