The Minnesota Homegrown Cookbook: Local Food, Local Restaurants, Local Recipes

Overview

This photography rich book is a love song for local food. Through narrating the stories of 31 Minnesota chefs and restaurants, the Minnesota Homegrown Cookbook offers 100 recipes that celebrate cooking with local, sustainably grown food. The passion of these chefs, and the farmers they work with, sings throughout the pages.

This cookbook combines rich traditions and delightful innovations. The mouth-watering fare of world-class bed-and-breakfasts is here, alongside the saucy mix...

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The Minnesota Homegrown Cookbook: Local Food, Local Restaurants, Local Recipes

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Overview

This photography rich book is a love song for local food. Through narrating the stories of 31 Minnesota chefs and restaurants, the Minnesota Homegrown Cookbook offers 100 recipes that celebrate cooking with local, sustainably grown food. The passion of these chefs, and the farmers they work with, sings throughout the pages.

This cookbook combines rich traditions and delightful innovations. The mouth-watering fare of world-class bed-and-breakfasts is here, alongside the saucy mix of cultural cuisines from kitchens at the Twin Cities’ Café Brenda, Spoon River, Lucia’s, Heartland, and the delectable slow cooking of eateries like the New Scenic Café in Two Harbors and Minwanjige Café in Strawberry Lake. Mixing the familiar comfort food of Minnesota’s roots in the culture of Northern Europe with the fine new flavors of world cuisine, these recipes comprise a travel guide through Minnesota, with illustrated profiles of chefs and farmers, of food and farms.

The Minnesota Homegrown Cookbook is the newest release from

Renewing the Countryside (RTC), a Minnesota-based non-profit organization that champions the positive stories of rural revitalization. In additional to developing books, RTC produces educational programming around local foods and sustainable agriculture including the Local Food Hero radio show, the Healthy Local Foods exhibit at the State Fair’s EcoExperience and Green Routes, a sustainable tourism initiative.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780760331422
  • Publisher: Voyageur Press
  • Publication date: 5/15/2008
  • Series: Homegrown Cookbooks Series
  • Edition description: First
  • Pages: 160
  • Product dimensions: 9.50 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Garrison Keillor is a native Minnesotan. His old-style radio variety show, A Prairie Home Companion, has reported on the world of Midwestern winters, Lutherans, and Norwegian bachelor farmers since 1974. He is the author of more than 30 books.

Alice Tanghe is a food writer with more than 20 years experience. She was the publisher of Minnesota Palate magazine, and is now creating an online version supporting the spirit of \u201cCreating Community Through Local Food.\u201d An avid cook, she\u2019s has more than 500 rare cookbooks in her kitchen.Tim King is a Minnesota organic vegetable farmer and agricultural journalist. He's grown everything from organic garlic to strawberries, apples, bell peppers, and herbs. As a journalist he has written hundreds of articles on organic farming and the workings of the organics industry. Tim is also a cofounder of two Twin Cities farmer's markets, past program manager for the Sustainable Farming Association of Minnesota, a founding board member of the Minnesota Institute for Sustainable Agriculture, and a cofounder of the Whole Farm Cooperative. Alice Tanghe is a food writer with more than 20 years experience. She was the publisher of Minnesota Palate magazine, and is now creating an online version supporting the spirit of "Creating Community Through Local Food." An avid cook, she's has more than 500 rare cookbooks in her kitchen.Tim King is a Minnesota organic vegetable farmer and agricultural journalist. He's grown everything from organic garlic to strawberries, apples, bell peppers, and herbs. As a journalist he has written hundreds of articles on organic farming and the workings of the organics industry. Tim is also a cofounder of two Twin Cities farmer's markets, past program manager for the Sustainable Farming Association of Minnesota, a founding board member of the Minnesota Institute for Sustainable Agriculture, and a cofounder of the Whole Farm Cooperative. Alice Tanghe is a food writer with more than 20 years experience. She was the publisher of Minnesota Palate magazine, and is now creating an online version supporting the spirit of "Creating Community Through Local Food." An avid cook, she's has more than 500 rare cookbooks in her kitchen.

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Table of Contents

Table of contents

 

Foreword by Garrison Keillor

Introduction

 

North Shore

Angry Trout Cafe

Dockside Fish Market

            Wild Mushroom-Tomato Bisque

            Blueberry Cream Tart

            Smoked Herring with Cranberry Horseradish Sauce

 

Chez Jude

Wild Acres Game Farm

            Bistro Roasted Chicken

            Herbs de Provence Meat Rub

            Yukon Gold and Root Vegetable Mousse

            Wild Blueberry Maple Crème Brûlée

 

Ellery House Bed and Breakfast

Park Lake Farm

            Joan’s Strawberry Rhubarb Muffins

            Featherbed Eggs

            Jim’s Stuffed French Toast

            Minnesota Chocolate Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting

            Cream Cheese Frosting

 

New Scenic Cafe

Bay Produce

            Northern Waters Smoked Salmon Appetizer

            Roasted Garlic Vinaigrette

            Organic Tomato and Herb Oil Appetizer

            Cilantro Oil

            Bittersweet Chocolate Ganache Fondue

 

Pine and Lake Country

Prairie Bay Restaurant

The Farm on St. Mathias

            Prairie Bay Pizza Margherita

            Wild Mushroom Strudel

            Backlot Bistro Sweet Corn Polenta

 

Brewed Awakenings Coffeehouse

Spica Farm

            Tomato Coconut Curry Soup

            Potato Spinach Soup

            German Potato Stew

 

Country Bed & Breakfast

Steve Anderson Sugarbush

            Budd’s Country Bed & Breakfast Omelet

            Lois’s Buttermilk Pancakes

 

Red River Valley

Caribou Grill

Double J Elk

            Strawberry Spinach Salad

            Corn Chowder

            Barbecue Bacon Elk Burger

 

Loghouse & Homestead on Spirit Lake

Jake’s Syrup and Natural Products

Muskrat Coffee Company

            Wild Rice Sausage

            Spirited Baked Apples

            Spoon Bread in a Mug

            Glazed Apple Slices

            Puff Pancake with Strawberry-Almond Butter

            Maple Pecan French Toast

 

Minwanjige Cafe

Native Harvest

            Oatmeal Molasses Bread

            Corn Posole Bison Stew

            Wild Rice Cranberry Stuffing

 

Minnesota River Valley

The Amboy Cottage Cafe

Whole Grain Milling Company

            Northern Lights Swiss Chard Quiche

            Butternut Basil Soup

            Seeded Oat and Potato Bread

 

Java River Cafe

Dry Weather Creek Farm

            Country Whole Wheat Bread

            Cranberry Multi-Grain Bread

 

St. Peter Food Coop

Shepherd’s Way Farms

            Velvety Yam Soup

            Caprese Salad

 

Bluff Country

Nosh Restaurant & Bar

Rochester Farmers Market

            Grilled Pork Loin with Two-Potato Hash and Elderberry Demi Glace

            Grilled Lamb Chops with Blue Cheese Bread Pudding and Tomato-Cucumber Relish

            Roasted Beet Salad

            Linzer Torte

 

Dancing Winds Farmstay Retreat

Callister Farm

            Chevron Meatloaf

            Asparagus with Goat Cheese and Morels on Fettuccine

            Herb Goat Cheese Quesadillas

            Callister’s Beer Can Chicken

 

The Backroom Deli

Whole Grain Milling Company

DreamAcres

            Back Room Deli Salsa

            Back Room Deli Hummus

 

Scandinavian Inn

Hilltop Pastures Family Farm

            Vegetarian Quiche

            Scandinavian Inn Herb Potatoes

            Danish Rødgrød Raspberry Pudding

            Norwegian Rommegrot Cream Pudding

 

Twin Cities Area

Restaurant Alma and Brasa

Otter Creek Growers

            Sweet Corn Flan

            Seasonal Greens Souffle

            Fennel Gratin

 

Bryant Lake Bowl, Barbette, and Red Stag

Moonstone Farm

            Bryant Lake Bowl Chicken Wings in Barbecue Sauce

            Bryant Lake Bowl Black River Blue Cheese Dressing

            Bryant Lake Bowl Dijon Mustard Vinaigrette

 

Bayport Cookery

Thousand Hills Cattle Company

            Wild Acres Pheasant with Wild Rice Risotto and Dried Cherry Pinot Noir Sauce

            Beef Tenderloin with Garlic Confit, Wilted Spinach, and Braised Oxtail

 

Birchwood Cafe

Riverbend Farm

            Farro Carrot Cakes with Fennel Kumquat Pistachio Salad and Carrot Coulis

            Strawberry Rhubarb Cobbler

            Roasted Pumpkin Hand Pie

 

Corner Table

Southeast Food Network

            Spring Lamb with Oranges, Lemons, Green Olives, and Oven-Roasted Potatoes

 

El Norteño

Whole Farm Co-op

            Enchiladas Suisas

 

Gardens of Salonica

Hill and Vale Farm

Zweber Farm

Roger’s Farm

            Fasolakiia Arni (Lamb and Green Beans)

            Tourlou

            Rizogalo (Rice Pudding)

 

Heartland

Cedar Summit

            Midwestern Cassoulet

            Fresh Vegetable Slaw

            Asparagus-Barley Risotto

            Green Gazpacho with Dill Sour Cream

 

Hell’s Kitchen and Hell’s Kitchen Duluth

Silver Bison Ranch

            Maple-Glazed Bison Sausage

            Bison Sausage Bread

            Mahnomin Porridge

 

Lucia’s Restaurant, Lucia’s Wine Bar, and Lucia’s To Go

Fischer Farm

Riverbend Farms

            Porketta (Garlic-Fennel Pork Roast)

            Beer Batter Walleye Fingers with Maple-Mustard Dipping Sauce

 

Classic Rosewood Inn

Alexis Bailly Vineyard

            Curried Chutney Spread on Crisp Apple Slices

            Apple Cranberry Chutney

            Roasted Green Beans with Sun-dried Tomatoes, Goat Cheese, and Olives

            Wild Rice-Zucchini Pancakes

 

Minnesota Landscape Arboretum and Good Life Catering

            Grilled Gouda Sandwich with Roasted Beets and Arugula

            Three Sisters Salad

            Roasted Vegetable Casserole

 

Cafe Brenda and Spoonriver Restaurant

Mill City Farmers’ Market

            East Indian Potato and Pea Pastries

            Veggie Burgers

 

Trotters Café and Bakery

Northwoods Organic Produce

            Carrot Dill Soup

            Sweet Potato Oat Currant Bread

            Zesty Cornbread

            Triple Fruit Scones

 

Ackowledgments

Glossary

Local Food Resources

Restaurant Directory

Index

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Foreword

Foreword by Garrison Keillor

I grew up a few steps from a half-acre vegetable garden and it pretty much ruined me for fine dining forever after. When you've eaten sweet corn ten minutes removed from the stalk, you've experienced intense sensual pleasure at a young age and what can the great chefs of New York and Paris offer to compete with it?

My father John loved sweet corn and most other fresh vegetables, also raspberries and strawberries, and after Christmas he pored over the seed catalogues with all the varieties with names like race horses, Contender, Kentucky Wonder, Little Marvel, Early Perfection, Silver Queen, Early Prolific, and I recall a broccoli called the Brigadier. And also Detroit Supreme Beets. He was a Minnesota farm boy and even after we moved to the outskirts of Minneapolis, he preferred to butcher his own chickens rather than buy the plastic-wrapped stuff at Super Valu. In the spring, he plowed the half acre and planted the rows - the strawberry beds and raspberry patch lay to the east so he planted melons and cucumbers on the west side of the plot, a regiment of corn to the rear, the pole beans and tomatoes and peas and root crops in the middle - and as we ate the last Mason jars of Mother's canned goods from the shelves in the laundry room and cleaned out the freezer, we awaited the glories of July and August and September.

In sweet corn season, Mother fixed Sunday dinner or weekday supper, got the pot roast or meatloaf or hot dish all set, and had a big pot of water boiling on the stove before we kids were dispatched to pick the corn. We picked an armload and started husking it as we walked to the house and put thenaked ears in the boiling water for a few minutes, the prayer was said, the platter of steaming corn on the cob was brought to the table, we distributed it with tongs and slathered it with butter and salted it and ate it in our hands, chewing the kernels off either in lateral or circular fashion, and we never ever said, "This sure is good sweet corn!" Never. You'd only say that if somebody served you week-old storebought corn, to make them feel better. The ten-minute corn was beyond goodness - it was a spiritual experience, proof that God exists and that He loves you, and there is no need to compliment God on the sweet corn, what's necessary is to love this gift and enjoy it, and we did.

There were six of us children, so labor was cheap, and the soil was good black loam, and the output of that half-acre was just prodigious. Awesome, in fact. The gross yield of forty tomato plants can give you daily salads, bushels of tomatoes to stew and can, and bags of tomatoes to take to relatives in the city. But the greatest prize is for the boy hoeing the tomatoes who reaches down and rescues one and wipes the dust off and bites into it. That is pure pleasure, a privilege offered to few, and after it, you will never be happy with any tomato you buy in a store. You hold it to your nose and there is no tomatoness there whatsoever. It was bred for shelf life and strip-mined in Mexico, or the Imperial Valley of California, and artificially ripened, and now it has no more tomato essence than your shoe. This is why vinaigrette dressing was invented: to provide some flavor for denatured vegetables.

Where I grew up in the late Forties and Fifties, in Brooklyn Park township along the Mississippi five miles north of the Minneapolis city limits, there were truck farms - "truck" here means "miscellany," not the motorized vehicle - that raised vegetables for sale at the Farmers Market near downtown. There was a farm that specialized in radishes and onions and another that mostly raised strawberries. The Fishers had a big asparagus operation, and Fred Peterson raised sweet corn and peas, and there were potato farms north of us along the West River Road and over towards Osseo. A boy could hop on his bike and ride off any summer morning and find work there, put in eight hours picking potatoes and earn 50 cents an hour plus a bag of unsellable scabby potatoes to take home for supper.

My family was in the first wave of settlement after World War II. My dad got a G.I. loan to buy lumber and he built the house himself on an acre of cornfield he bought from Fred Peterson, and other houses sprang up near us, and all of them had big vegetable gardens. That was the beauty of the acre lot: you put a house and yard on half of it and farmed the other half. When the value of land zoomed in the late Sixties, people sold off that back half-acre. It was ironical - the urge to have some land on which to raise a garden led to a land rush that wiped out the gardens - and soon the lovers of sweet corn and tomatoes had to settle far from the city and endure long commutes.

And most of us children who grew up on fresh tomatoes went off to live lives that did not include a garden. All but one of my father's siblings - Lawrence, Jim, Eleanor, Elizabeth, Bob, Josephine - had vegetable gardens of considerable breadth and variety, and none of my five siblings raise their own food and neither do I. We all became city dwellers and had better things to do with our time. We went to the movies. We stayed late at the office. We dashed from home to a meeting and then back to the office and en route, hungry, we saw the golden arches and drove up to the intercom and got the burger and fries and ate it as we drove. There was no McTomato or McCorn on the menu.

The co-op movement of the Seventies placed a premium on Local and Organic and that has led us back toward the garden. In my neighborhood co-op I can occasionally find tomatoes that smell of tomato and if I drive over to Wisconsin in the summer I will eventually find a pickup truck parked by a field and a big sign SWEET CORN and a boy sitting in the shade. And if my wife and I go to the right restaurant, we will find a menu that tells where the salad comes from and where the fish was caught and who raised the cow who provided the strip steak, which is always of interest.

I can never be a boy again standing barefoot in a garden on a sunny day and holding a ripe tomato in my hand - don't really want to be him anyway - but this lovely book gives me hope that something beautiful that I thought had passed away has actually come full circle and that other people in Minnesota share this same longing for fresh food. Back in my childhood, the Sunday paper sometimes ran stories about What The World Will Be Like In The Year 2000 and, in addition to travel by rocket cars and living in glass-domed houses, the futurists agreed that people in 2000 would take their meals in the form of pills. This did not strike us as something to look forward to. The futurists were thinking only of convenience - we are a restless people and notoriously impatient and so you might assume that we'd prefer to have dinner in the form of capsules, gulp them down, save ourselves the trouble - but in fact we have a secret longing for pleasure too. We are some of the hardest working people on the planet, and we deserve a little reward now and then. A fresh tomato, sliced, with chilled cucumber and pepper and onion. An ear of corn. Six small red potatoes, boiled in their skins. All of it homegrown. From this, one can regain faith in divine providence and restore a sense of the kindness and beauty of the world and resolve to rise up tomorrow and try to do what needs to be done.
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