Minorities and the Juvenile Justice System: Research Summary

Minorities and the Juvenile Justice System: Research Summary

by U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Carl E. Pope, William Feyerherm
     
 
Since the publication of this document in December 1993, the Office of Juvenile
Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has continued its work in addressing the disproportionate rate with which juveniles from racial or ethnic minorities become involved in the juvenile justice system. National data sources, research studies, and individual State analysis over

Overview

Since the publication of this document in December 1993, the Office of Juvenile
Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has continued its work in addressing the disproportionate rate with which juveniles from racial or ethnic minorities become involved in the juvenile justice system. National data sources, research studies, and individual State analysis over the past 2 years have documented the fact that minority offenders are also overrepresented in secure facilities across the country. While minority juveniles make up 32 percent of the juvenile population, the most recent Children in Custody Census shows an increase in the percentage of minority juveniles in secure detention and correctional facilities from 53 to 63 percent in the 6-year period from 1987 to 1993.

This report focuses on the official processing of minority youth and does not
deal with the conditions that can lead minority youth into contact with the
juvenile justice system. Disproportionate representation may be accounted for
by some combination of selection bias on the part of the juvenile justice system
and the nature and volume of offenses committed by minority youth. In the
latter case, structural and economic factors associated with the urban underclass may result in an increase in the type and number of crimes committed by youthful offenders. Thus, differential involvement in youth crime may, in part, account for the increasing number of minorities coming into contact with the juvenile justice system. However, differential involvement in crime is a different issue from what happens to youthful offenders once they enter the juvenile justice system.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013140608
Publisher:
1001 Property Solutions LLC
Publication date:
07/27/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
4 MB

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