The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

( 694 )

Overview

Once, in a house on Egypt Street, there lived a china rabbit named Edward Tulane. The rabbit was very pleased with himself, and for good reason: he was owned by a girl named Abilene, who treated him with the utmost care and adored him completely.

And then, one day, he was lost.

Kate DiCamillo and Bagram Ibatoulline take us on an extraordinary journey, from the depths of the ocean to the net of a fisherman, from the top of a garbage heap to the...

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Overview

Once, in a house on Egypt Street, there lived a china rabbit named Edward Tulane. The rabbit was very pleased with himself, and for good reason: he was owned by a girl named Abilene, who treated him with the utmost care and adored him completely.

And then, one day, he was lost.

Kate DiCamillo and Bagram Ibatoulline take us on an extraordinary journey, from the depths of the ocean to the net of a fisherman, from the top of a garbage heap to the fireside of a hobies' camp, from the bedside of an ailing child to the streets of Memphis. And along the way, we are shown a true miracle -- that even a heart of the most breakable kind can learn to love, to lose, and to love again.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
It all starts simply: A china rabbit, a house, and a girl. And then one day, the rabbit, who is named Edward Tulane, disappears and begins a miraculous journey. Newbery medalist Kate diCamillo and artist Bagram Ibatoulline have created a piercingly beautiful story about love, loss, and the power to love again.
Michael Patrick Hearn
DiCamillo's latest novel, The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, may well be her best. It is an elegant volume of creamy pages with a handsome typeface and generous margins in a pale green binding. Bagram Ibatoulline's haunting color plates and sepia illustrations at the beginning of each chapter evoke the era of Andrew Wyeth, Howard Pyle and Maxfield Parrish. The novel is set in the storybook land of no specific time or locale. There are no annoying cellphones or Starbucks cafes. Not even the pictures give a clue to the exact period covered by the events. It could be the America of the Great Depression reconstructed on a vast Hollywood back lot.
— The New York Times
From The Critics
From the author of the bestselling The Tale of Despereaux and Because of Winn-Dixie comes another flawlessly written beauty of a book. Separated from his owner, a handsome but arrogant china rabbit named Edward is taken in by a series of people, including a fisherman, a hobo, and a seriously ill child. Edward's journey is both physical and emotional, as he learns how to love and then to love again after loss. Counseled by another doll to "be awash in hope. You must wonder who will love you, whom you will love next," Edward finds his sorrow displaced by a joyful reunion. Short chapters (also great for reading aloud) are interspersed with lovely sepia-toned and full-color illustrations that are just as evocative as this masterfully told tale. (Ages 8 to 12)
Child magazine's Best Children's Book Awards 2006
Publishers Weekly
Equal parts fantasy and old-fashioned heart-tugger, DiCamillo's (Because of Winn-Dixie) timeless tale about the adventures of a china rabbit proves fine material for family listening in the capable hands of actress Ivey, who brings deeper hues of emotion to an already colorfully original script. China rabbit Edward Tulane is a dapper, rather full-of-himself fellow, never appreciating the love heaped on him by his 10-year-old owner Abilene. But when Edward is tossed overboard during a trans-Atlantic voyage with Abilene's family, he discovers that his own complicated journey is just beginning. Ivey provides a stalwart, straightforward narration and additionally proves an agile player, delivering the accents and voices of the variegated cast that drifts in and out of Edward's life. As Ivey brings Edward's travels full circle, listeners will wholly believe his subtle yet magical transformation. Ages 7-up. (Feb.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
This is the somewhat improbable story of Edward Tulane, the china rabbit adored by young Abilene, who finds himself tossed overboard during a sea journey that becomes far more than a mere ocean crossing. Edward's fate is to be passed from person to person, sometimes loved, sometimes hated. Along the way Edward begins to understand what love and caring for someone means as he sees what life is like with it and without it. This circular story may appear a bit contrived, but it is more an allegory than a straightforward fantasy. The prose is spare and considered, and the characters are fully drawn and complete. A further treat is Bagram Ibatoulline's artwork throughout the text. Lush and elegant, it lends Edward the dignity he so richly deserves. 2006, Candlewick, Ages 7 to 10.
—Joan Kindig, Ph.D.
Jennifer Stevens
Edward Tulane is not your ordinary, garden-variety rabbit. He is a china rabbit, made of the finest porcelain. He wears custom-made silk clothes and carries a small, golden pocket watch. Edward is the much-loved birthday gift of Abilene Tulane, 10, who includes him in all of the family's dinners and outings. However, Edward has a heart made of that same, cold china; he is conceited and selfish and doesn't seem to understand what love is. That is, until he is lost, having been thrown overboard by some rambunctious boys during the Tulane family's ocean journey. From there, Edward bounces from home to home, from one life to the next, as the book progresses. From lying on the ocean floor to traveling with a hobo to lying in the arms of a sick child, Edward learns about love and loss and why hope is always important to have. This is a brilliant story about the importance and challenges of true love and friendship. Newbery-Award winning author Kate DiCamillo presents a riveting plot that is wonderfully complemented by illustrator Bagram Ibatoulline's exquisite illustrations.
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-This achingly beautiful story shows a true master of writing at her very best. Edward Tulane is an exceedingly vain, cold-hearted china rabbit owned by 10-year-old Abilene Tulane, who dearly loves him. Her grandmother relates a fairy tale about a princess who never felt love; she then whispers to Edward that he disappoints her. His path to redemption begins when he falls overboard during the family's ocean journey. Sinking to the bottom of the sea where he will spend 297 days, Edward feels his first emotion-fear. Caught in a fisherman's net, he lives with the old man and his wife and begins to care about his humans. Then their adult daughter takes him to the dump, where a dog and a hobo find him. They ride the rails together until Edward is cruelly separated from them. His heart is truly broken when next owner, four-year-old Sarah Ruth, dies. He recalls Abilene's grandmother with a new sense of humility, wishing she knew that he has learned to love. When his head is shattered by an angry man, Edward wants to join Sarah Ruth but those he has loved convince him to live. Repaired by a doll store owner, he closes his heart to love, as it is too painful, until a wise doll tells him that he that he must open his heart for someone to love him. This superb book is beautifully written in spare yet stirring language. The tender look at the changes from arrogance to grateful loving is perfectly delineated. Ibatoulline's lovely sepia-toned gouache illustrations and beautifully rendered color plates are exquisite. An ever-so-marvelous tale.-B. Allison Gray, John Jermain Library, Sag Harbor, NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Once again, DiCamillo harkens back to an older storytelling style, filled with magic and the transformational power of love. Edward Tulane is a china rabbit-dapper and serious and more than a little superior. His mistress, Abilene Tulane, loved him and "thought almost as highly of Edward as Edward thought of himself." Edward is interested in little beyond his own comfort and beauty. Indeed, everyone except for Abilene's grandmother, Pellegrina, condescends to him. She commissioned his making, ordered his dapper clothing and smart pocket watch and, in the end, demanded a good deal more of Edward than he thought he wanted to give. Her warning, "You disappoint me," thrusts Edward into the adventure that becomes his life. He learns about love, loss and consequences. Somewhere between fairy tale and fable, DiCamillo spins the tale of Edward, transformed by the lives he touches. The reader will be transformed too. Sumptuous gouache illustrations complement the old-fashioned, dramatic narrative. Keep the tissues handy for this one. (Fiction. 7+)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763625894
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication date: 2/14/2006
  • Pages: 228
  • Sales rank: 89,614
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 700L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.25 (w) x 8.38 (h) x 0.83 (d)

Meet the Author

Kate DiCamillo

KATE DICAMILLO is the author of THE TALE of DESPEREAUX which received the Newbery Medal; BECAUSE of WINN-DIXIE, which received a Newbery Honor; THE TIGER RISING, which was named a National Book Award Finalist; and, most recently, the MERCY WATSON stories. She says, "One Christmas, I received an elegantly dressed toy rabbit as a gift. I brought him home, placed him on a chair in my living room, and promptly forgot about him. A few days later, I dreamed that the rabbit was face-down on the ocean floor - lost, and waiting to be found. In telling THE MIRACULOUS JOURNEY OF EDWARD TULANE, I was lost for a good long while, too. And then, finally, like Edward, I was found."

BAGRAM IBATOULLINE is the illustrator of CROSSING by Philip Booth; THE NIGHTINGALE by Hans Christian Andersen, retold by Stephen Mitchell; THE ANIMAL HEDGE by Paul Fleischman; HANA in the TIME of the TULIPS by Deborah Noyes; and THE SERPENT CAME to GLOUCESTER by M. T. Anderson. He says, "It was a singular and most pleasurable experience to work on the illustrations for EDWARD TULANE and to be there with him on his journey. I must admit, I'm a bit wistful now that I've come to the end of this very special book."

Biography

Kate DiCamillo was born in Philadelphia, moved to Florida's warmer climate when she was five years old, and landed in Minneapolis in her 20s.

While working at a children's bookstore, DiCamillo wrote her first novel, Because of Winn-Dixie (2000). It was inspired by one of the worst winters in Minnesota, when she became homesick for Florida after overhearing a little girl with a southern accent. One thing led to another, and soon DiCamillo had created the voice of Opal Buloni, a resilient ten-year-old girl who has just moved to a small town in Florida with her father. Opal's mother abandoned the family when she was three years old, and her father has a hard time explaining why.

Thoug her father is busy and she has no friends, Opal's life takes a turn for the better when she adopts a fun-loving stray dog, Winn-Dixie (named after the supermarket where she found him, out in the parking lot). With Winn-Dixie as her guide, Opal makes friends with the eccentric people of her new town and even convinces her father to talk about her mother. Through Opal, readers are given a gift: a funny and heartrending story of how one girl's spirit can change her life and others'. Critics loved the book as much as readers, and in 2001, Because of Winn-Dixie was named a Newbery Honor Book.

DiCamillo's second novel, The Tiger Rising (2001), also deals with the importance of friendships, families, and making changes. Twelve-year-old Rob Horton and his father are dealing with grief, anger, and isolation after moving to Lister, Florida, six months after Rob's mother succumbs to cancer. Rob's father has a job at a motel (where they both also live), but it barely pays the bills. Struggling through the loss of his mother, Rob stifles his many confusing emotions as he battles bullies at his new school, worries about a rash on his legs, and copes with living in poverty.

In many ways, The Tiger Rising is a darker, more challenging story than Because of Winn-Dixie, but there is a similar light of deliverance in this beautiful novel: the healing power of friendship. Two meetings change Rob's life. First, he encounters a caged lion in the woods. Shortly thereafter he meets Sistine, who has recently moved to Lister after her parents' divorce. Sistine and Rob are polar opposites -- she stands up to the school bullies and lets out every bit of her anger at her parents' divorce and her relocation. Through Sistine, Rob recognizes himself in the caged lion, and the story of how the two children free the beast is one of the most engaging reads in contemporary young adult fiction. With the lion free, Rob is free to grieve the loss of his mother and move on with his bittersweet new life in Lister. A National Book Award finalist, The Tiger Rising is hard to put down as it overflows with raw, engaging emotion.

In 2003, DiCamillo's third novel, The Tale of Despereaux, was released to the delight of readers and critics alike. This odd but enthralling fairy tale also touches on some of the topics from her first two novels -- parental abandonment and finding the courage to be yourself. The hero, Despereaux Tilling, is a mouse who has always been different from the rest of his family, and to make matters worse, he has broken a serious rule: interacting with humans, particularly Princess Pea, who captures his heart. When Despereaux finds himself in trouble with the mouse community, he is saddened to learn that his father will not defend him. Characters in the tale are Princess Pea, whose mother died after seeing a rat in her soup; King Pea, who, in his grief, declares that no soup may be served anywhere in the kingdom; Miggery Sow, a servant girl who dreams of being a princess after being sold into servitude by her father after her mother dies; and Roscuro, a villainous rat with a curious soup obsession.

The story of how the characters' paths cross makes The Tale of Despereaux an adventurous read, reminiscent of Grimm's fairy tales. In the spirit of love and forgiveness, Despereaux changes everyone's life, including his own. As the unnamed, witty narrator of the novel tells us, "Every action, reader, no matter how small, has a consequence." Kate DiCamillo's limitless imagination and her talent for emotional storytelling earned her one of the most prestigious honors a children's author can receive -- in 2004, she was awarded the Newbery Medal.

Good To Know

DiCamillo wrote The Tale of Despereaux for a friend's son, who had asked her to write a story for him about a hero with large ears.

In our interview, DiCamillo shared some other fun facts with us: :

"I can't cook and I'm always on the lookout for a free meal."

"I love dogs and I'm an aunt to a very bad dog named Henry."

"My first job was at McDonald's. I was overjoyed when I got a nickel raise."

"I'm a pretty boring person. I like reading. I like eating dinner out with friends. I like walking Henry. And I like to laugh."

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    1. Hometown:
      Minneapolis, Minnesota
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 25, 1964
    2. Place of Birth:
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, University of Florida at Gainesville, 1987

Read an Excerpt

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane


By Kate DiCamillo

Candlewick Press

Copyright © 2006 Kate DiCamillo All right reserved.
ISBN: 0-7636-2589-2


Chapter One

Once, in a house on Egypt Street, there lived a rabbit who was made almost entirely of china. He had china arms and china legs, china paws and a china head, a china torso and a china nose. His arms and legs were jointed and joined by wire so that his china elbows and china knees could be bent, giving him much freedom of movement.

His ears were made of real rabbit fur, and beneath the fur, there were strong, bendable wires, which allowed the ears to be arranged into poses that reflected the rabbit's mood-jaunty, tired, full of ennui. His tail, too, was made of real rabbit fur and was fluffy and soft and well shaped.

The rabbit's name was Edward Tulane, and he was tall. He measured almost three feet from the tip of his ears to the tip of his feet; his eyes were painted a penetrating and intelligent blue.

In all, Edward Tulane felt himself to be an exceptional specimen. Only his whiskers gave him pause. They were long and elegant (as they should be), but they were of uncertain origin. Edward felt quite strongly that they were not the whiskers of a rabbit. Whom the whiskers had belonged to initially-what unsavory animal-was a question that Edward could not bear to consider for too long. And so he did not. He preferred, as a rule, not to think unpleasantthoughts.

Edward's mistress was a ten-year-old, dark-haired girl named Abilene Tulane, who thought almost as highly of Edward as Edward thought of himself. Each morning after she dressed herself for school, Abilene dressed Edward.

The china rabbit was in possession of an extraordinary wardrobe composed of handmade silk suits, custom shoes fashioned from the finest leather and designed specifically for his-rabbit feet, and a wide array of hats equipped with holes so that they could easily fit over Edward's large and expressive ears. Each pair of well-cut pants had a small pocket for Edward's gold pocket watch. Abilene wound this watch for him each morning.

"Now, Edward," she said to him after she was done winding the watch, "when the big hand is on the twelve and the little hand is on the three, I will come home to you."

She placed Edward on a chair in the dining room and positioned the chair so that Edward was looking out the window and could see the path that led up to the Tulane front door. Abilene balanced the watch on his left leg. She kissed the tips of his ears, and then she left and Edward spent the day staring out at Egypt Street, listening to the tick of his watch and waiting.

Of all the seasons of the year, the rabbit most preferred winter, for the sun set early then and the dining-room windows became dark and Edward could see his own reflection in the glass. And what a reflection it was! What an elegant figure he cut! Edward never ceased to be amazed at his own fineness.

In the evening, Edward sat at the dining-room table with the other members of the Tulane family: Abilene; her mother and father; and Abilene's grandmother, who was called Pellegrina. True, Edward's ears barely cleared the tabletop, and true also, he spent the duration of the meal staring straight ahead at nothing but the bright and blinding white of the tablecloth. But he was there, a rabbit at the table.

Abilene's parents found it charming that Abilene considered Edward real, and that she sometimes requested that a phrase or story be repeated because Edward had not heard it.

"Papa," Abilene would say, "I'm afraid that Edward didn't catch that last bit."

Abilene's father would then turn in the direction of Edward's ears and speak slowly, repeating what he had just said for the benefit of the china rabbit. Edward pretended, out of courtesy to Abilene, to listen. But, in truth, he was not very interested in what people had to say. And also, he did not care for Abilene's parents and their condescending manner toward him. All adults, in fact, condescended to him.

Only Abilene's grandmother spoke to him as Abilene did, as one equal to another. Pellegrina was very old. She had a large, sharp nose and bright, black eyes that shone like dark stars. It was Pellegrina who was responsible for Edward's existence. It was she who had commissioned his making, she who had ordered his silk suits and his pocket watch, his jaunty hats and his bendable ears, his fine leather shoes and his jointed arms and legs, all from a master craftsman in her native France. It was Pellegrina who had given him as a gift to Abilene on her seventh birthday.

And it was Pellegrina who came each night to tuck Abilene into her bed and Edward into his.

"Will you tell us a story, Pellegrina?" Abilene asked her grandmother each night.

"Not tonight, lady," said Pellegrina.

"When?" asked Abilene. "What night?"

"Soon," said Pellegrina. "Soon there will be a story."

And then she turned off the light, and Edward and Abilene lay in the dark of the bedroom.

"I love you, Edward," Abilene said each night after Pellegrina had left. She said those words and then she waited, almost as if she expected Edward to say something in return.

Edward said nothing. He said nothing because, of course, he could not speak. He lay in his small bed next to Abilene's large one. He stared up at the ceiling and listened to the sound of her breath entering and leaving her body, knowing that soon she would be asleep. Because Edward's eyes were painted on and he could not close them, he was always awake.

Sometimes, if Abilene put him into his bed on his side instead of on his back, he could see through the cracks in the curtains and out into the dark night. On clear nights, the stars shone, and their pinprick light comforted Edward in a way that he could not quite understand. Often, he stared at the stars all night until the dark finally gave way to dawn.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamillo Copyright © 2006 by Kate DiCamillo. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.


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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 694 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(564)

4 Star

(83)

3 Star

(18)

2 Star

(16)

1 Star

(13)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 698 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2008

    Awesome book!

    I am a 5th grade teacher and this book was recommended to me by our librarian. I have two classes and this is my second year reading this book. (which means I have read it a total of 4 times). Each time I read it, I get more attached to the characters. The best part about this book, my students both boys and girls LOVE it. I am already looking forward to being able to share this book with my son. It's such a great book!

    79 out of 83 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2008

    Wonderful story for everyone to read

    I bought this for my 8yo daughter to read during a transatlantic flight. I was shocked to wake up from my nap to find her crying. She is a prolific reader for her age and I have never seen a book touch her like this one did. I had to read it for myself and, of course- I cried too! It is a heartwarming book. Be warned though, it does deal with death and can be a little much for some young readers.

    52 out of 59 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2009

    Not just for kids

    As I perused the bookshelves of Barnes & Noble one Saturday afternoon, the cover of this little book caught my eye. I started reading it and didn't stop until I was done pausing only briefly to purchase the book and drive home. I loved the story and the wonderful pictures at the beginning of each chapter. I read and reread the final chapter several times and each time it evoked the same swell of emotions. This book has a timeless quality and I envision reading and rereading it many times over.

    37 out of 40 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2008

    Awesome!

    I am an elementary teacher and this book was recommended by my school librarian so I bought it at the school book fair. I read it within two days on and off. There was moments where I laughed, others where I cried. My students would see me reading and were intrigued by the book so this coming school year we are going to read it as a class. I hope they feel the same way about the book as I did.

    26 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2012

    Amazed

    This book can break your heart and make you cry tears of sadness but it can also make you smile and surprisr and make you cry tears of joy. This book is a little bit of a love story in it but it als ha adventure and mystery and always makes you question whats going to hapen next. This is a good book to read a second or third time. Maybe even a fourth time. This is why i am giving this book give stars. It is also so well put together. I really do reccomend this to people age 8 and up

    25 out of 28 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

    Love Edward!

    This book inspired me to write my own stories. The love and passion put into this book has literally made me tear up every single time I have read this story. This is my most favorite fiction story I've ever read. I insist others to read and find out about Edward's journey!

    15 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 16, 2010

    Beautiful and touching...

    Such a sweet, moving story for children to discover on their own, to make adults think, or to share with your kids (or even your bookclub!) and discuss. Brilliant character development and lovely illustrations. It was refreshing to experience a well-written children's book containing strong characters that so aptly depicted the value of true friendship, acceptance and love. It is the perfect balance of emotion and restraint; the story moves along at a good pace, spending the right amount of time at each point in the plot. There are some 'heavier' scenes and elements, but they are handled well. This was my first Kate DiCamillo book and I am anxious to read more.

    14 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2012

    Great book

    This is a sweet heart-touching book!!I think it is a great bed time story for all ages!!!But it is a little sad but still a GREAT book to read!!! :D

    13 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2008

    What you don't learn from your parents. . .

    You learn from your kids. And from an amazing rabbit and the people who love him! What a wonderful book. Keep writing, Ms DiCamillo! I adore your work!

    11 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2012

    BEST BOOK EVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Everyone who can should defenly readthis book!
    Read this book
    I tell you READ it, now
    This book is for all ages
    It is completey apropriote
    And its the best book ever

    9 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2011

    Great book BUT slow pace.

    Great it was sad, touching, some time a litle slow but great if you like these things in a book, this book is great for you. BUT!!! if youan't stay with a book because it is slow pace like me this is NOT!!! the book for you (,)__(,) ( ' . ' ) bunny is so cute! (o o) O O

    8 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2005

    A Bittersweet, yet adorable story

    This story is about an incredibly vain china rabbit, Edward Tulane, who is very pleased with himself until one day he is thrown overboard a ship and is lost. Edward is taken on a miraculous journey and learns what it really feels like to love, especially to feel emotion for someone besides himself. Edward's story teaches a valuable lesson, after what seems like a loss equivalent to 'the end of the world', it is still possible to love again.

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    I love this book! it's so great!

    I love this book! it's so great!

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2012

    Edward

    This book is really good my school had to read it for March is reading month. I recomend it to any body!!!!!

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2012

    Heartbreaking

    This story was heartbraking and loving and great i look for more books by this author!!!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2012

    Great story

    I am in 6th grade and i read it in 4tj and i still give it 5
    Stars!!!!!!!!

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2012

    Person

    Awsome book lve it

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2012

    Awsome

    I love this book it is the best book i had read in my whole life

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2012

    Wow

    I read this book to my 6 yearold it is now my favorite book

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2006

    Depressing!

    I bought this book for my 10 year old. I am sorry. We read it togethor and she asked me at the end why did it have to be such a sad book. I think we forget that our kids are not ready to handle some of the emotions childrens books are selling. I think we are trusting others to decide what is a childs book for our kids. I have learned from this book, and a few other children's books clearly not meant for children, to read the book first before I give it to my child. I miss the days of well written fun books for kids. We seem to have alot of deep emotional books out for our 12 and under kids. Why? Isn't life emotional enough for our kids without having them get more of it when it is time to sit and enjoy a good book? The books message is a great one, for adults. I would save it to give as a gift for an adult friend.

    6 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

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