Miranda and the Movies

Miranda and the Movies

by Teryl Euvremer, Jane Kendall
     
 

Nothing exciting ever happens in Leewood Heights, New Jersey, home of Miranda Gaines. But in 1914 an unusual troupe of characters rents the house next door, and Miranda falls into a scene straight out of silent movie comedies. In fact, her fall from a tree lands her in the middle of the fledgling movie industry and opens up a whole new world to the headstrong preteen.… See more details below

Overview

Nothing exciting ever happens in Leewood Heights, New Jersey, home of Miranda Gaines. But in 1914 an unusual troupe of characters rents the house next door, and Miranda falls into a scene straight out of silent movie comedies. In fact, her fall from a tree lands her in the middle of the fledgling movie industry and opens up a whole new world to the headstrong preteen. Miranda and the Movies introduces Miranda Gaines, an endearing and funny heroine-and offers a colorful look at the early days of American filmmaking. 4-1/2 X 7.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A satisfying tale of villainy renounced, Euvremer's ( After Dark ) latest book stars three thieves: Croc, who steals edibles; Brac, who ``fancies bric-a-brac''; and sturdy Stoc, who could cart a piano across town as easy ``as moving checkers across a board.'' After the shifty trio of animals has practically cleaned out the town of Peck's Pocket, they steal a plant-- captigonia scoundrelis --that first ensnares them in a leafy prison and then reforms them--by subtly instilling in these culprits a passion for gardening. Like jumble in an antique store, Euvremer's distinctive, detailed drawings reward those who look carefully. The thieves' house is piled high with purloined property--quaint figurines, watermelon, teapots, purses, peacock feathers--and the text contains deliciously droll language that surprises at every turn. Ages 3-7. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
Croc, Brac, and Stoc are thieves. Living in the center of a bucolic village, they sleep all day and sneak out at night to strip their neighbors' houses bare. One moonless night, they steal a plant labelled Captigonia scoundrelis and plant it in the yard. It changes their lives, first because they enjoy showering it with attention and care, and then because it seals their house with circling branches and showy purple blossoms. Grateful for freedom after a narrow escape from the cottage, they become gardeners, sharing their produce with any who are in need. This funny, improbable moral tale is Steig-like in its wry humor and slightly off-center characters. Stylized dialogue (`` ` What dazzling delectability! ' sighed Croc. `What a luscious lollapalooza! ' '') punctuates emphatic narration. The book succeeds in part because of contrasts in content and visual style. The robbers--a wolf, a mouse, and a boar--are never threatening, rendered as they are in feathery brush strokes and soft hues. Their loot forms an unmistakably happy clutter. Throughout, full-color pages are alive with activity, light, and vivid anthropomorphic characterizations. This is an attractive tale that will delight read-aloud groups and provide a pocket of good cheer for independent readers as well. --Carolyn Noah, Worcester Public Library, MA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780517573570
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
09/01/1989
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
224
Age Range:
11 Years

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