Mirror Images: Women, Surrealism, and Self-Representation

Overview

During the 1930s and 1940s, women artists associated with the Surrealist movement produced a significant body of self-images that have no equivalent among the works of their male colleagues. While male artists exalted Woman's otherness in fetishized images, women artists explored their own subjective worlds. The self-images of Claude Cahun, Dorothea Tanning, Leonora Carrington, Frida Kahlo,
Meret Oppenheim, Remedios Varo, Kay Sage, and others both internalize and challenge ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $28.14   
  • New (3) from $195.00   
  • Used (5) from $28.14   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$195.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(164)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$204.50
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(273)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$490.09
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(0)

Condition: New
1998 Paperback New 0262531577. Flawless copy, brand new, pristine, never opened--208 pp. With 88 ills. (19 col. ). 28 x 21 cm.; 0.6 x 10.9 x 7.8 Inches.

Ships from: New Hampton, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

During the 1930s and 1940s, women artists associated with the Surrealist movement produced a significant body of self-images that have no equivalent among the works of their male colleagues. While male artists exalted Woman's otherness in fetishized images, women artists explored their own subjective worlds. The self-images of Claude Cahun, Dorothea Tanning, Leonora Carrington, Frida Kahlo,
Meret Oppenheim, Remedios Varo, Kay Sage, and others both internalize and challenge conventions for representing femininity, the female body, and female subjectivity.
Many of the representational strategies employed by these pioneers continue to resonate in the work of contemporary women artists. The words "Surrealist" and
"surrealism" appear frequently in discussions of such contemporary artists as Louise Bourgeois, Ana Mendieta, Cindy Sherman, Francesca Woodman, Kiki Smith, Dorothy Cross, Michiko Kon, and Paula Santiago.This book, which accompanies an exhibition organized by the MIT List Visual Arts Center, explores specific aspects of the relationship between historic and contemporary work in the context of Surrealism.
The contributors reexamine art historical assumptions about gender, identity, and intergenerational legacies within modernist and postmodernist frameworks. Questions raised include: how did women in both groups draw from their experiences of gender and sexuality? What do contemporary artistic practices involving the use of body images owe to the earlier examples of both female and male Surrealists? What is the relationship between self-image and self- knowledge?Contributors : Dawn Ades,
Whitney Chadwick, Salomon Grimberg, Katy Kline, Helaine Posner, Susan Rubin Suleiman, Dickran Tashjian.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Sue Taylor
...[D]oes deliver myriad new insights and a variety of interpretive approaches....The fundamentalindeed necessaryambivalence of these women regarding surrealism is the overriding theme...which underscores their active agency in constructing feminine subjectivities in the face of their own otherness. —Art Journal
Library Journal
Seven essays are published here, one contributed by Chadwick herself, a well-known specialist on women artists who were part of the surrealist movement. The resulting anthology, which serves as a catalog to an exhibition traveling from fall 1998 through early 1999, is a fairly comprehensive look at the self-portraiture of contemporary women using feminist critical theory. The essayists find strong links between modernist historical Surrealism and contemporary women artists while highlighting the strategies of "displacement, doubling, fragmentation, and fetishizing of the baby" that frequently appear in works by Cindy Sherman, Kiki Smith, Louise Bourgeois, Dorothy Cross, and Ana Mendieta, among others. Of widest interest are the essays on Marcel Duchamp/Rose Selavy, Claude Cahun, and Cindy Sherman and Frida Kahlo. Recommended.--Mary Hamel-Schwulst, Towson Univ., MD
Sue Taylor
...[D]oes deliver myriad new insights and a variety of interpretive approaches....The fundamental, indeed necessary, ambivalence of these women regarding surrealism is the overriding theme...which underscores their active agency in constructing feminine subjectivities in the face of their own otherness.
Art Journal
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262531573
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 4/10/1998
  • Pages: 207
  • Product dimensions: 7.80 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword
1 An Infinite Play of Empty Mirrors: Women, Surrealism, and Self-Representation 2
2 "Vous Pour Moi?": Marcel Duchamp and Transgender Coupling 36
3 In or out of the Picture: Claude Cahun and Cindy Sherman 66
4 Frida Kahlo: The Self as an End 82
5 Orbits of the Savage Moon: Surrealism and the Representation of the Female Subject in Mexico and Postwar Paris 106
6 Dialogue and Double Allegiance: Some Contemporary Women Artists and the Historical Avant-Garde 128
7 The Self and the World: Negotiating Boundaries in the Art of Yayoi Kusama, Ana Mendieta, and Francesca Woodman 156
Selected Bibliography 172
Photo Credits 184
Index 186
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)