Mischa Maisky and Martha Argerich in Concert

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Scott Paulin
They may have been the three greatest Russian-born composers of the 20th century, but Igor Stravinsky, Serge Prokofiev, and Dmitri Shostakovich traveled in very different musical directions. A cross-section of their output -- say, each composer's principal work for cello with piano -- suffices to reveal the diversity of their genius, and that's precisely what Mischa Maisky and Martha Argerich did in the April 2003 Brussels concert presented on this disc. Maisky and Argerich are frequent collaborators and kindred spirits; each brings an unpredictable fire to their performances, yet they play off each other's inspiration as if bonded by a shared sense of intuition. ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Scott Paulin
They may have been the three greatest Russian-born composers of the 20th century, but Igor Stravinsky, Serge Prokofiev, and Dmitri Shostakovich traveled in very different musical directions. A cross-section of their output -- say, each composer's principal work for cello with piano -- suffices to reveal the diversity of their genius, and that's precisely what Mischa Maisky and Martha Argerich did in the April 2003 Brussels concert presented on this disc. Maisky and Argerich are frequent collaborators and kindred spirits; each brings an unpredictable fire to their performances, yet they play off each other's inspiration as if bonded by a shared sense of intuition. Stravinsky's Suite italienne is an arrangement of several movements from the ballet Pulcinella; this version for which the composer had Gregor Piatigorsky's help exploits the cello's full range of colors and techniques and shows Maisky and Argerich at their most playful. Prokofiev's Cello Sonata, a relatively late work from 1949, emphasizes the instrument's lyrical side. The warmth of Maisky's tone is well-suited to realizing the music's eloquent potential -- he's a master of unusually expressive pizzicati -- while Argerich darts around the cello's melodies like quicksilver. As the listener may expect, Shostakovich's 1934 Cello Sonata is the darkest of the three works: Beautiful tone is less important here than dramatic intensity. Maisky's recording of this composer's two Cello Concertos is one of his finest achievements, and he's equally in tune with the Sonata's often troubled waters: It's easily the most gripping performance in the recital. Having traversed an astonishing variety of moods, Maisky and Argerich return to perform a waltz from Prokofiev's ballet The Stone Flower as an encore, more lighthearted but no less captivating than the rest of this most engaging program.
All Music Guide - James Leonard
This disc is the reason that recordings exist: to preserve great performances of great music in transparent sound. This April 2003 recording made in Flagey Hall in Brussels of performances by cellist Mischa Maisky and pianist Martha Argerich is certainly among the best performances ever made of this repertoire. Indeed, only the Rostropovich and Shostakovich performances can compare with them and, even there, it is arguable that Maisky and Argerich's are equally convincing. And equally original: while Maisky is a supreme technician, he is also the most fervent living cellist; while Argerich is beyond virtuosity, she is also the most passionate living pianist; and while there have been great, even definitive, recordings of all these works before, Maisky and Argerich are so commanding and so compelling and so overwhelming that comparisons are pointless. Superbly programmed and translucently recorded, this disc certainly should be heard by anyone who loves great performances of great music.
Gramophone - Rob Cowan
On one level this is an amazing recital, the ultimate demonstration of how two artists with individual ideas and the technical wherewithal to realise them in practice can tease, cajole, pull or push the line, toy with dynamics, experiment with rubato, in a word (all senses) really play.

On one level this is an amazing recital, the ultimate demonstration of how two artists with individual ideas and the technical wherewithal to realise them in practice can tease, cajole, pull or push the line, toy with dynamics, experiment with rubato, in a word (all senses) really play.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 3/8/2005
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • UPC: 028947753230
  • Catalog Number: 000404702
  • Sales rank: 100,874

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Suite Italienne, for cello & piano (after Pulcinella, transcribed with Gregor Piatigorsky) - Martha Argerich & Igor Stravinsky (17:36)
  2. 2 Sonata for cello & piano in C major, Op. 119 - Martha Argerich & Sergey Prokofiev (23:26)
  3. 3 Sonata for cello & piano in D minor, Op. 40 - Martha Argerich & Dmitry Shostakovich (25:38)
  4. 4 The Tale of the Stone Flower, ballet, Op. 118: Waltz - Martha Argerich & Sergey Prokofiev (2:15)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Martha Argerich Piano
Mischa Maisky Cello
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