Misquoting Truth: A Guide to the Fallacies of Bart Ehrman's "Misquoting Jesus"

( 13 )

Overview

"What good does it do to say that the words [of the Bible] are inspired by God if most people have absolutely no access to these words, but only to more or less clumsy renderings of these words into a language? . . . How does it help us to say that the Bible is the inerrant word of God if in fact we don't have the words that God inerrantly inspired? . . . We have only error-ridden copies, and the vast majority of these are centuries removed from the originals."

So contends Bart D. Ehrman in his bestselling ...

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Overview

"What good does it do to say that the words [of the Bible] are inspired by God if most people have absolutely no access to these words, but only to more or less clumsy renderings of these words into a language? . . . How does it help us to say that the Bible is the inerrant word of God if in fact we don't have the words that God inerrantly inspired? . . . We have only error-ridden copies, and the vast majority of these are centuries removed from the originals."

So contends Bart D. Ehrman in his bestselling Misquoting Jesus. If altogether true, we have little reason to put our confidence in Scripture. Add to this Ehrman's contention that what we read in the New Testament represents the winners' version of events, twisted to suit their own purposes and not at all a faithful recounting of what really happened, and the case for skepticism and unbelief gives every appearance of being on solid footing.

But are things really so bad off? Were the New Testament documents widely distorted by copyists? Can we in fact have no idea what was in the originals? Do we have no hope of knowing what eyewitnesses said and thought? Are other documents left out of the New Testament better sources for understanding early Christianity? While readily conceding that Ehrman has many of his facts straight, pastor and researcher Timothy Paul Jones argues that Ehrman is far too quick to jump to false and unnecessary conclusions.

In clear, straightforward prose, Jones explores and explains the ins and outs of copying the New Testament, why lost Christianities were lost, and why the Christian message still rings true today.

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Editorial Reviews

Peter Jones
"Dr. Jones has written a first-rate book on an essential and timely subject. Both specialists and nonspecialists will benefit from his honest, polite and clearly explained treatment of issues concerning the reliability of the New Testament text and its authorship. In a day of confusion among non-Christians and Christians alike, this is a must-read."
Craig L. Blomberg
"The most radical wing of New Testament scholarship has gotten a disproportionate amount of press in recent years. As representative as any of this trend today is Bart Ehrman, whose books on textual criticism and noncanonical Gospels make it sound as if we have little idea what the New Testament authors originally wrote or little reason to believe that theirs was an accurate, and certainly the oldest, rendition of the life of Jesus and the gospel message. Timothy Jones sets the record straight in this courteous but direct critique of charges about misquoting Jesus and alternate or lost Christianities. Abreast of all the latest and best scholarship, he nevertheless writes in a straightforward, easy-to-read style that any thoughtful layperson can handle. An absolute must-read for anyone confused or taken in by the revisionist biblical historians of our day."
Gary R. Habermas
"In recent years, Christians have been assailed by a book genre that is increasingly critical of Christian beliefs. Misquoting Truth reminds us that this critical alarm is often sounded in bombastic ways that seldom present the whole picture. Timothy Jones explains why there is no new information in Bart Ehrman's Misquoting Jesus that threatens what Christians believe about the New Testament text. Further, he moves the discussion to a shelf where it is accessible to everyone. Numerous practical teaching pointers help the reader to digest the material. The result is a well-integrated volume that accomplishes what few books do: disarming the critics while at the same time connecting with a large range of readers. Bravo, InterVarsity, for publishing yet another excellent volume that communicates crucial truth to this generation!"
Craig A. Evans
"In Misquoting Truth, Timothy Paul Jones gives Bart Ehrman's Misquoting Jesus and Lost Christianities the debunking they deserve. Jones exposes the bias and faulty logic that surface time and again in these highly publicized books. Misquoting Truth provides a much needed antidote and will serve students and Christian leaders very well. I recommend this book enthusiastically."
D. James Kennedy
"Among many antifaith books you may find Bart Ehrman's Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why. This is a broadside attack upon the Scriptures, and Christians need to be able to rebut it. Thankfully, Dr. Timothy Paul Jones has written Misquoting Truth, a scholarly and gracious (but firm) rebuttal to Dr. Ehrman."
Robert Yarbrough
"Timothy Paul Jones turns the tables on Bart Ehrman's overstated Misquoting Jesus. He applies to Ehrman the same probing logic that Ehrman claims to apply to the New Testament evidence. The evidence turns out to be more believable than Ehrman's strained interpretations of it. It is not the New Testament writers or copyists who depart from history, Jones shows, but a few scholars who invest too much faith in their skepticism. Jones not only checks that skepticism: along the way he equips readers to make their own informed choices about authorship, scribal transmission, and church selection (or rejection) of key New Testament passages and documents--and many writings from outside the New Testament as well. This is a valuable primer for orientation in a discussion that cannot be ignored."
T. Scott Caulley
"It is an unfortunate thing when a scholar uses a technical discipline such as textual criticism to browbeat an unsuspecting public. Timothy Jones's evenhanded approach challenges the overblown claims of Ehrman's sensationalized account of the textual history of the New Testament. Jones agrees with Ehrman at many basic points, but repeatedly challenges his conclusion that the New Testament is untrustworthy, effectively countering each of Ehrman's revisionist claims. In a most readable treatment Jones presents anew the case for the trustworthiness of the New Testament.
"There was a time when F. F. Bruce's little book on the reliability of the New Testament documents was enough. Now new challenges to the integrity of the New Testament have arisen. Timothy Jones rises to meet these new challenges by combining this refutation of Bart Ehrman's book Misquoting Jesus with a thorough primer on New Testament textual criticism. Both authors work with the same evidence and share a good deal of common ground, but they arrive at surprisingly different conclusions. In the process of challenging the conclusions of Bart Ehrman's popular book, Jones investigates several alleged 'significant changes' in the text and finds that none of them requires readers to rethink an essential belief about Jesus or to doubt the historical integrity of the New Testament.
"This book is classic apologetics yet without any hint of rancor. Jones writes in a readable conversational style, combining pastoral concern with excellent activities for beginning students as well as entertaining anecdotes and illustrations. The book is autobiographical to a high degree, which increases its personal appeal.
"Written with troubled believers in mind, Jones begins by borrowing a generous definition of inerrancy--inerrancy means simply that the Bible tells the truth--a definition which, he says, gives plenty of room for the many extant textual variants. In the end, Timothy Jones suggests that Ehrman lost his faith not because he 'peered so deeply into the origins of Christian faith,' but because he gained his understanding of Christian faith in a fundamentalist evangelical context that allowed little (if any) space for questions, variations or rough edges. Jones does not shy away from these 'rough edges,' but he presents a compelling case that the New Testament text as we have it is a reliable witness to the teachings of Jesus and of the first Christians."
Everett Piper
"Dr. Jones reminds us that Christians should never be afraid of open debate. With tradition, experience, reason and Scripture as our final measure we can put all ideas on the table with confidence that in the end we will embrace what is true and discard what is false."
Lief Moi
"Jones clearly refutes in a Christlike manner the claims of Misquoting Jesus. A must-read for those who love to give an answer for the faith!"
James L. Garlow
"Timothy Paul Jones's writings are always engaging, compelling and often humorous. He captivates me with everything he writes. When I read his writing, I have many 'Aha!' or 'I wish I'd thought of that' moments. This isn't the first great book that Timothy's written, and it won't be the last. Make certain you don't miss it!"
Paul D. Wegner
"In Misquoting Truth, Timothy Paul Jones has written an informative, creative book that needs to be read by all serious, thinking Christians. It is as informative as it is entertaining, and it will provide a secure foundation for continuing to trust in the accuracy of God's Word. It answers the basic criticisms leveled at the New Testament by Dr. Bart Ehrman, while at the same time providing a proper understanding of the basics of textual criticism. Jones does not skirt the difficult issues, but deals with them head-on, providing careful and balanced answers. I highly recommend this book to those seeking to find answers to the question, 'Can the Word of God be trusted?' "
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780830834471
  • Publisher: InterVarsity Press
  • Publication date: 5/23/2007
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 1,410,283
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Timothy Paul Jones (Ed.D.) is professor in the School of Leadership and Church Ministry at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. Formerly senior pastor of First Baptist Church of Rolling Hills in Tulsa, Oklahoma, he is the author of Finding God in a Galaxy Far, Far Away; Praying like the Jew, Jesus; Answers to The Da Vinci Code; Prayers Jesus Prayed; Christian History Made Easy and (with James Garlow and April Williams) the bestselling The Da Vinci Codebreaker.
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Table of Contents

Introduction: A New Breed of Biblical Scholar?
Part One: Why the Texts Can Be Trusted
1 Truth About "The Originals That Matter"
2 Truth About the Copyists
3 Truth About "Significant Changes" in the New Testament
4 Truth About "Misquoting Jesus"
Part Two: Why the Lost Christianities Were Lost
5 Truth About Oral History
6 Truth About the Authors of the Gospels
7 Truth About Eyewitness Testimony
8 Truth About How the Books Were Chosen
Concluding Reflections: "It Fits the Lock"
Appendix: How Valuable Is the Testimony of Papias?
Acknowledgments
About the Author
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Customer Reviews

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( 13 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2007

    A reviewer

    Fundamentalist Christians, like this author, perenially tear down other works without valid basis. They rush to publication any 'answer' they can just do 'counteract' the 'Devil.' Don't waste your money on this book. It's just another propaganda tool for unthinking Christians who are unwilling to consider the truth about Bibilical/ Theological history and reality.

    13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2008

    What a waste of time....lame attempt at rebuttal

    I read this to try to get as much information as i could. After reading Misquoting Jesus,I saw this book, so I wanted to be fair....Do not waste your money. This book is ridiculous. It is merely an unintelligent attempt to refute something, but instead of using evidence it uses opinion and relies on the readers ignorance. If you want a well researched book, you would be better off in the fiction section. If you are a faithful follower, you may like it, since you are a member of the choir that is being preached to. If you are open minded....stay away...this is merely fodder for the wanna-be apologists.....I wish I could get my money back!!!!

    11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2008

    A reviewer

    This is a poorly written bit of religious propaganda that should be skipped by anyone with a serious/critical mind.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2009

    Inaccurate

    Very biased, poorly researched

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 13, 2011

    Intellectual dishonesty abounds

    Just came across this in the library. I read it with some interest to see what a worthwhile refutation of Bart Ehrman's work might look like. This was not it. As I understand his 'argument', the bible is inerrant if you decide inerrant does not mean free from error. The 'truth' of the bible (whatever that may mean) is what makes it inerrant. If you like intellectual dishonesty on this scale, then this is the book for you. If you any critical faculties whatsoever then save your money.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2007

    Intelligent and readable textual criticism

    Having read numerous tomes that try to counter the claims of Bart Ehrman, I often at the close feel somewhat disappointed. It's not that the authors did not have sound evidence or posit their points well, it's that they missed Ehrman's true, underlying criticism. But Jones doesn't. he understands what Ehrman is saying about all ancient biographies and critiques Ehrman's work well while fully admitting he has many of his fact correct. really, a wonderful apologetic yet neutral (how often can you find that?) read.

    2 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 27, 2014

    absolute dogma without a clue. Is this the man who gave us man a

    absolute dogma without a clue. Is this the man who gave us man and dinosaur together and proclaimed our gay brethern were "devil spawn"?

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  • Posted December 12, 2013

    Highly recommended.

    Many people are not fans of Bart Ehrman. It's nice to see someone with the proper credentials stand up to Ehrman and expose his inaccuracies.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 2, 2012

    Disappointed in Content and Argument. I did not find this book

    Disappointed in Content and Argument. I did not find this book as well researched as those they are criticizing. The books I have read by Mr. Ehrman have been very well researched and only point out the human errors and “enhancements” that most accept as reality. When I started this book, I was hoping for a factual based argument, but that was not to be. I would not recommend this book to those that are interested in historical studies of scripture and Christianity.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted April 19, 2009

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    Posted January 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted June 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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