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Miss Brooks' Story Nook (where tales are told and ogres are welcome)
     

Miss Brooks' Story Nook (where tales are told and ogres are welcome)

by Barbara Bottner, Michael Emberley (Illustrator)
 

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A hilarious companion to the New York Times bestselling Miss Brooks Loves Books! (and I don’t) about the power of stories and storytelling.
 
Missy loves her librarian, Miss Brooks. And she loves to go to Miss Brooks’ before-school story time. But to get to Story Nook, she has to pass Billy Toomey’s

Overview

A hilarious companion to the New York Times bestselling Miss Brooks Loves Books! (and I don’t) about the power of stories and storytelling.
 
Missy loves her librarian, Miss Brooks. And she loves to go to Miss Brooks’ before-school story time. But to get to Story Nook, she has to pass Billy Toomey’s house—and she does not love Billy Toomey.
 
Billy always tries to steal her hat and jeers, “I’m going to get you!” It’s vexing. Then one rainy (and hatless) day, Miss Brooks changes story hour to storytelling hour. She teaches the kids about characters and plot and action and satisfying conclusions and encourages them to make up their own tales.
 
And that’s when Missy has a brainstorm. She sees a way to use her made-up story to deal with her real-life bully.
 
In this terrifically funny ode to inventiveness and ingenuity, Barbara Bottner and Michael Emberley celebrate the power of stories and how they can help us to rewrite our own lives.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
07/14/2014
Bottner and Emberley shift focus from reading to storytelling in this wickedly funny companion to Miss Brooks Loves Books (and I Don’t). A power outage makes it too dark to read during Story Nook time, so Miss Brooks guides her students through the art of storytelling. Initially reluctant to invent a story, heroine Missy eventually unspools a tale about an ogre whose escaped snake makes quick work of Missy’s “exasperating” neighbor, Billy Toomey: “It wraps around him and squeezes so hard, his eyes pop out.” While introducing the ideas of plot, characters, problem-solving, and “satisfying endings,” these collaborators demonstrate in no uncertain terms just how much real-life power stories can have. Ages 5–9. (Aug.)
Children's Literature - Elizabeth Fronk
Missy eagerly anticipates Miss Brooks’ story time, but she must walk past Billy Toomey’s house first. Billy bullies Missy so she prefers going the long way to school. As she arrives for Story Nook, a storm knocks out the power. Much to Missy’s dismay, Miss Brooks suggests telling stories. Missy prefers to read stories but Miss Brooks remains undaunted. She explains that stories can begin with a problem that needs a solution. Missy does not want to talk about her real problem so she begins a story about a neighborhood ogre. Miss Brooks encourages Missy to tell more about the ogre with Missy’s classmates contributing. Missy needs an ending to her story; she finds a good way to both solve her Billy problem and end her story. Fans of Bottner’s first book about Miss Brooks, Miss Brooks Loves Books! (And I Don’t), and new readers can enjoy this sequel. Emberley’s pen and watercolor illustrations add a light touch to the various situations. Missy’s solution may be a little lost on preschoolers and it may appear too simple for older readers; however, Miss Brooks’ enthusiasm more than makes up for it. For preschool and early elementary, this title can serve as an introduction to storytelling. Reviewer: Elizabeth Fronk; Ages 4 to 7.
Kirkus Reviews
2014-05-19
Energetic, book-loving Miss Brooks is back, as is Missy, the grumpy, stumpy, hat-wearing reluctant reader-turned-bookworm who is her biggest fan (Miss Brooks Loves Books (and I don't), 2010).This time around, though, there's a new wrinkle: a boy named Billy who likes to torment Missy and steal her precious hats. Missy mostly manages to avoid him, but sometimes she can't help but pass by his house, and that's where the trouble always occurs. When a storm knocks out the lights at school one morning, Miss Brooks decides to take advantage of the atmosphere and have the kids tell stories instead of listening to her read aloud. Although her classmates suggest focusing on aliens, kittens or ghosts, Missy finds herself unexpectedly brainstorming a solution to her problem while concocting a semi-scary story about a neighborhood ogre named Graciela and her very large boa constrictor. Over-the-top silliness in Emberley's appealing illustrations contrasts with Bottner's deadpan delivery to amplify the humor, while clever details in the pictures reward close examination. Characters come alive with distinct voices and appearances, and the twin plots flow smoothly, if purposively, to the requisite "happy ending."While sequels can sometimes be disappointing, readers and listeners who enjoyed Miss Brooks' first appearance will likely be very happy to find out what happens next—and they just might be inspired to create some tall tales of their own. (Picture book. 4-8)
School Library Journal
05/01/2014
K-Gr 2—When a power outage strikes during story time, the school librarian invites her students to create a tale. Due to conflicts of preference—ogres, snakes, kittens, or ghosts—the students create their own endings to the tale of Graciela the witch. The narrator, a charmingly disheveled young girl, decides to rev up the horror in her tale in order to intimidate the class bully. Emberley's cartoons detail imaginary reptiles and fearful children with equal panache. The story introduces some elements of fiction writing, such as plot, action, and endings. Elementary-aged readers will identify with the classroom dynamics.—Gay Lynn Van Vleck, Henrico County Library, Glen Allen, VA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780449813287
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
08/05/2014
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
730,304
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.20(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD510L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 9 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

BARBARA BOTTNER studied painting in Paris, worked as a set desinger, toured as part of an acting ensemble, and made animated shorts for Sesame Street before turning to writing and illustrating children's books. She is the author of more than 36 books, including Miss Brooks Loves Books! (and I Don't) and Bootsie Barker Bites, illustrated by Peggy Rathmann.

MICHAEL EMBERLEY has been writing and illustrating children's books since 1979. He has more than 20 books to his credit, and he has a sister and father (Rebecca and Ed) who also make children's books. His hobbies include bicycle racing, bike riding, cycling, mountain biking, and avoiding driving.

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