Miss Mousie's Blind Date

Miss Mousie's Blind Date

4.0 1
by Tim Beiser, Rachel Berman
     
 

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A second book from the award-winning author/illustrator team, Tim Beiser and Rachel Berman. As charming as BRADLEY MCGOGG, we think this story will sell at least as well, but possibly even better!
 
A charming story about self-acceptance, and love lost and found, told through the eyes of a dear little mouse, and her possibly-not-so-handsome suitor

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Overview

A second book from the award-winning author/illustrator team, Tim Beiser and Rachel Berman. As charming as BRADLEY MCGOGG, we think this story will sell at least as well, but possibly even better!
 
A charming story about self-acceptance, and love lost and found, told through the eyes of a dear little mouse, and her possibly-not-so-handsome suitor, Mole. Chramingly illustrated, cleverly told, the message is timeless, and the illustrations endearing.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Like a bizarre cross between Beatrix Potter and Ugly Betty, this tale of romance from the team behind Bradley McGogg: The Very Fine Frog involves adorably dressed characters and some crass sentiments. Dowdy Miss Mousie is lovestruck when she spies Matt Labatt the rat in the deli, but he’s a cad. “Hey, Mole,” he says to the deli owner after Miss Mousie coyly drops her handkerchief, “tell that fat girl by the door/ to pick her hankie up.” Miss Mousie is devastated, but her hopes spring anew when she receives a mystery invitation. She disguises herself, hoping to appear exotic rather than banal; the mystery date turns out to be the deli-owning mole, who’s as insecure as she is—cue the happily-ever-after theme music. Berman draws Miss Mousie’s long gowns and dainty furnishings with tender care, and Beiser never cheats on rhyme or meter. But the story gets its biggest laughs from making fun of Miss Mousie’s weight and the mole’s poor eyesight—far from a compassionate portrait of disability, it’s an inexplicable lapse in judgment. Ages 3–6. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
Finalist - 2013 Governor General’s Literary Award (Children's Illustration)
 
“…Miss Mousie’s Blind Date is a timeless tale about inner beauty … an adorable story of mouse love, with a quirky, dramatic main character that children will find funny…. The story rolls off the tongue … Berman’s illustrations are adorable, in a classic muted colour scheme style reminiscent of Frog and Toad….”
—Recommended, CM

“…Beiser's sprightly text has warmth, heart and a valuable lesson. Berman's pictures, in watercolor and gouache on rag, suggest Beatrix Potter, ably matching the crisp elegance of the story. Wonderful.”
—Starred, Kirkus Reviews

“The text surrounds delicate watercolor and gouache paintings reminiscent of Beatrix Potter, which add plenty of charm to this winsome rhyming tale. …[A] lesson in true love from wise animals.”
Booklist

“Written in verse and accompanied by cunning and detailed illustrations, this picture book shows children that it is always wise to be yourself. With plenty of gentle humor throughout, the story demonstrates beautifully how badly things can go wrong if you try to be someone you are not.”
—Through the Looking Glass Children's Book Review

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Spring "makes our furry woodland friends go cuckoo for romance." Jolly rhymes tell the tale of how Miss Mousie's knees turn to jelly at the sight of Matt LaBatt, the water rat. He, however, thinks she is fat. Unhappy back at home, Miss Mousie receives a mysterious invitation to dinner. She decides to disguise herself, but a fall in the rain on the way leaves her a mess. She still goes to the dinner address. To her surprise, her host turns out to be Mole, the owner of the deli where she had admired Matt. Disguised as Matt, and not seeing well ("blind date" indeed) Mole blunders around until Miss Mousie, laughing, urges him to put on his glasses and be himself. They both agree, for a romantic happy ending. Deftly drawn and painted anthropomorphic characters along with costumes and settings add to the charm of the telling. On the jacket/cover, an appealing Miss Mousie dances as she dresses in her elaborate disguise; the reverse of the jacket is an attractive poster. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Kirkus Reviews
Spring fever strikes even the rodents. And who knows where the heart leads? "Spring is such a funny thing--it wakes up all the plants / And makes our furry woodland friends go cuckoo for romance." Indeed. One day, when Miss Mousie is shopping at the mole's deli, her heart stops at the sight of rakish Matt LaBatt (the water rat), who looks suave (and très Français) in striped shirt and kerchief. She can barely speak...or squeak. "Her little legs went weak." When she drops her hankie to catch his attention, Matt calls her fat, which brings tears to her eyes and sends her to bed for a day. What brings her out of sadness is an anonymous invitation to dinner; of course she knows just who it is! She dresses to the nines, and all the animals applaud her as she walks excitedly to her date. But the would-be suitor is not Matt the water rat; it's the kind mole who owns the deli. He tries all manner of slick techniques to woo her, and they fall comically flat. But in the end, he pledges to be himself if she will do the same. Her reply? "Oui-oui." Beiser's sprightly text has warmth, heart and a valuable lesson. Berman's pictures, in watercolor and gouache on rag, suggest Beatrix Potter, ably matching the crisp elegance of the story. Wonderful. (Picture book. 5-8)
School Library Journal
Gr 2–4—Rhyming verse follows the absurd tale of Miss Mousie, who, while at the local deli, becomes infatuated with a rude rat (he calls her fat), ruining her day and making her take to her bed in tears. An anonymous invitation to a date perks her up, and, still feeling fat and unattractive, she dolls herself up in a bizarre ensemble and heads off to meet her suitor. He turns out to be none other than the owner of the deli, a mole who eschews his glasses to make himself more attractive. Between Mousie's ridiculous attire and the mole's inability to see, the date turns quite silly, and, in the end, both agree to be themselves. The watercolor and gouache illustrations, with animals dressed in sumptuous clothing, are whimsical and reminiscent of the work of John Goodall. The text is amusing, but some discussion may be needed to remind students that name-calling can have unfortunate consequences.—Sharon Grover, Hedberg Public Library, Janesville, WI

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781770492516
Publisher:
Tundra
Publication date:
10/09/2012
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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