Missing Beauty

Missing Beauty

by Teresa Carpenter
     
 

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Originally published in 1989, this true crime thriller brilliantly reconstructs one of the most extensive murder investigations in recent years the disappearance of Robin Benedict, a beautiful commercial artist and moonlighting prostitute, and her relationship with the suspect, the eminent Dr. William Douglas.  See more details below

Overview

Originally published in 1989, this true crime thriller brilliantly reconstructs one of the most extensive murder investigations in recent years the disappearance of Robin Benedict, a beautiful commercial artist and moonlighting prostitute, and her relationship with the suspect, the eminent Dr. William Douglas.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Perhaps not wanting to waste a footnote of her assiduous research, Carpenter, a Village Voice journalist, endlessly leads us into blind turns with insignificant information and further slows unfolding horrific events by supplying a curriculum vitae for seemingly everyone who had even the most incidental brush with the ``missing beauty.'' The case, as described by an attorney assessing its publicity potential, involves ``a professor killing a hooker who had a black pimp.'' The professor is William Douglas, researcher at Tufts University medical school in Boston, middle-aged, married, father of three children; the prostitute, 21-year-old Robin Benedict, from a middle-class Hispanic family, who died one March night in 1983 after being bludgeoned with a sledgehammer by Douglas at his suburban home. The body has never been found, although Benedict's killerat trial he copped a manslaughter plea and is serving an 18-20 year sentencemaintains that he discarded it in a dumpster in Providence, R.I. (Douglas is also serving a concurrent five-year sentence for embezzling tens of thousands of dollars from Tufts, spent on Benedict, his steady hooker.) Had the overlong book been trimmed to bring the case into sharper focus, this study of moral corruption, of police investigation at its most persistent, could have been a classic of its type. Notable nonetheless, it will reward the most dogged readers. Photos not seen by PW. (July)
Library Journal
One of the decade's most intriguing murders involved a victim and a killer who were not what they seemed: Ruth Benedict was the dutiful, loving daughter of a middle-class family and a Boston prostitute; William Douglas, an eminent scientist and extortionist. Tension is maintained throughout the author's extensive coverage of the investigation and trial. A terrific work of crime reporting (despite a reference to ``Mavil'' Dewey of the decimal code). Sally G. Waters, Stetson Law Lib., St. Petersburg, Fla.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393332230
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
06/01/1988
Pages:
484
Sales rank:
819,344
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.08(d)

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