Mission of Honor (Honor Harrington Series #12)

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Overview

Honor Harrington is Back. The New York Times Best-Selling Series Continues.

3.8 Million Honor Harrington Books in Print

7 Million David Weber Books in Print

17 New York Times Best Sellers

The Star Kingdom of Manticore and the Republic of Haven have been enemies for Honor Harrington's entire life, and she has paid a price for the victories she's achieved in that conflict. And ...

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Mission of Honor

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Overview

Honor Harrington is Back. The New York Times Best-Selling Series Continues.

3.8 Million Honor Harrington Books in Print

7 Million David Weber Books in Print

17 New York Times Best Sellers

The Star Kingdom of Manticore and the Republic of Haven have been enemies for Honor Harrington's entire life, and she has paid a price for the victories she's achieved in that conflict. And now the unstoppable juggernaut of the mighty Solarian League is on a collision course with Manticore. The millions who have already died may have been only a foretaste of the billions of casualties just over the horizon, and Honor sees it coming.

She's prepared to do anything, risk anything, to stop it, and she has a plan that may finally bring an end to the Havenite Wars and give even the Solarian League pause. But there are things not even Honor knows about. There are forces in play, hidden enemies in motion, all converging on the Star Kingdom of Manticore to crush the very life out of it, and Honor's worst nightmares fall short of the oncoming reality.

But Manticore's enemies may not have thought of everything after all. Because if everything Honor Harrington loves is going down to destruction, it won't be going alone.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

David Weber's first Honor Harrington novel in five years lived up to the expectations of military sci-fi enthusiasts when first released last year. Mission of Honor pits the battle-tested officer of the Royal Manticoran Navy against enemies that threaten the existence of the entire Star Kingdom. Not even Honor herself knows the sources or extent of the attacks that will confront this brave commander. Now in an inexpensive mass market edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439134511
  • Publisher: Baen
  • Publication date: 6/28/2011
  • Series: Honorverse Series , #12
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 880
  • Sales rank: 170,850
  • Product dimensions: 4.20 (w) x 6.70 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

David Weber
David Weber is a science fiction phenomenon. His popular Honor Harrington space-opera adventures are "New York Times" bestsellers and can't come out fast enough for his devoted readers. Weber and his wife Sharon live in South Carolina.
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Interviews & Essays

CRYOBURN
By Lois McMaster Bujold
November 2010
Baen Books

AFTER A SEVEN YEAR HIATUS, THE CHARISMATIC MILES VORKOSIGAN RETURNS IN A NEW NOVEL BY AWARD WINNING AUTHOR

LOIS McMASTER BUJOLD.

Hear what Barrayaran Imperial Auditor Lord Miles Naismith Vorkosigan has to say about his return in an interview with his creator Lois McMaster Bujold.

(Miles dreams...)

LMB: Miles?

Miles: ...

LMB: Miles...?

Miles (rolling over and snorting): Eh...?

LMB: Miles!

Miles (sleepily): Who's there?

LMB: This is your creator, Miles.

Miles (coming alert): Oh! Uh... hello, Goddess...?

LMB: A proper attitude, at least.

Miles: So, ah... what are you doing here?

LMB: I'm here to interview you.

Miles (growing wary): Why? I thought you didn't like breaking the literary frame. Remember how you bounced off that weird production of Goldini's The Venetian Twins at the Guthrie Theater?

LMB: Yeah, well. Things move along. Speaking of which, how have you been since that adventure with the mad ba?

Miles (getting even more cautious): Busy. Very busy. Much too busy for you. All boring stuff, y'know? Committee meetings at the Council of Counts, domestic scenes, developing the Vorkosigan's District -- well, I've mostly been dumping that on Ekaterin -- all that. Nothing to interest you, I'm sure. I'm not the droid you're looking for. Move along...

LMB: Nice try. How're the kids?

Miles (springing to his feet, white about the lips): You stay the hell away from my kids!

LMB: Easy, there! They are still too young to get into much trouble on their own. Except in fanfiction I suppose. Nothing to support a commercial novel. And I did the kidnapping trope back when you were still a blob in your uterine replicator. You know how I dislike repeating a trope.

Miles (easing back, still suspicious): Well... maybe. (Seized by sly inspiration.) So why don't you go bother my cousin Ivan? Such a slacker, that boy. He could use the exercise.

LMB: You know, you're about the seven-thousandth person to ask that question. His turn may yet come. But he doesn't go with this year's theme.

Miles: Theme? You pick characters to go with your theme? What is this, some kind of interior decorating scheme?

LMB: No, I'm not smart enough for that. I set characters in motion and let them show me the theme. And then I say, Oh. And, My. And, Wait, how did we end up here, again? So, Miles... how's your health holding up these days?

Miles: Adequately, no thanks to you. As well you know.

LMB: Seizures still under control?

Miles: In a kludgy sort of way. (Suddenly interested) You thinking of doing anything about that? New galactic medical technologies, something?

LMB: No, actually. I prefer you the way you are. But regarding galactic medical technologies, I'm glad you brought up the subject. Although, from your point of view, they're hardly new. I was thinking about cryonics. And demographics.

Miles: You've done cryonics, remember? That's how I ended up with the damned seizures. What was that about not repeating a trope? You're not going to kill and freeze me again, are you?

LMB: No, no. Your second death will be your last, I promise.

Miles (muttering): I'm not sure I like the sound of that...

LMB: But I've been musing for a long time over the intersection of cryonics and demographics.

Miles: Other writers have done that.

LMB: Indeed. But this is my take. I've shown the impact of the freeze-the-dead technology as an occasional emergency medical treatment; what happens when it's taken up society-wide, when everyone wants in on the act? With realistic economics? There are people actually trying to start this in my world today; I've met some. The arguments that have promptly followed have been most instructive. Old human nature meets new technology, film at 11. My slice isn't actually when it's new tech, though. I'm looking at it a bit further down the line, at longer-term consequences.

Miles: Doesn't sound like Barrayar. We're barely up to figuring out how to incorporate uterine replicators.

LMB: Yes, that's why I'm sending you to Kibou-daini, a rather more technologically advanced colony planet than Barrayar. Although that isn't saying much. Most places are.

Miles: Hey! Don't insult my homeworld! That's my job. (Thinks fast.) Anyway, I won't go. As I pointed out, I'm busy.

LMB: Actually, Emperor Gregor's sending you.

Miles: Oh. (Long pause) Barrayaran connection, is there?

LMB: That's for me to know and you to find out.

Miles (grumpy): Gee, thanks. I really appreciate that.

LMB: You won't, actually. But it'll be pretty amusing for the onlookers.

Miles: Are you sending me by myself?

LMB: No, you get to take your favorite minion, Armsman Roic.

Miles: Well, that's something, anyway. Good man, Roic. Despite that little incident back when with the bug butter.

LMB: You are getting older and creakier, you know.

Miles: Hey! I'm just turned 39, I'll have you know!

LMB: It's a hard-used 39. You need reliable help, I acknowledge that. And Roic is practically a Boy Scout, or at least a Canadian Mountie. Quite a change from old Sergeant Bothari. Have you noticed how your minions are getting saner and saner as you age? Why is that, I wonder?

Miles: Sampling artifact. If you're starting with Bothari, there's nowhere to go but saner.

LMB: Point. But we digress. Society-wide cryonics, what happens next? That's the question.

Miles: And what's the answer?

LMB: You know I don't do answers. Didactics are so not my thing. Let a hundred flowers bloom -- and then study and classify them. Besides, I have to leave you some free will.

Miles: It all sounds a trifle morbid.

LMB: Oh, it's all of that. An extended meditation on people's relation to death must have a certain amount of darkness built-in. But it's all in the tone, y'know. There will also be comic relief.

Miles: I'm not sure I like the sound of that any better. I'm still traumatized from that damned dinner party you put on.

LMB: You put that party on yourself, Miles. I merely didn't stop you.

Miles: (inarticulate growl.)

LMB: Actually, you are only just now of the age -- middle -- where you could tackle this theme properly. Miles in the middle, caught between the last generation and the next, and the only Barrayaran Imperial Auditor with such an intimate personal experience of what cryonics tech can do -- your whole life for the past decade has been its gift, as you will point out.

Miles: I will, will I? To whom?

LMB: No spoilers.

Miles (wheedling): Ah, c'mon, you can spoil me...

LMB: I already do.

Miles (tartly): Not so's I've noticed.

LMB: You should have seen the outtakes.

Miles (tempted pause): No, this nightmare is weird enough already.

LMB: Wise man.

Fin.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 34 )
Rating Distribution

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(17)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 24, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Fans of military science fiction will be euphoric with the return of Harrington

    The seemingly endless war (a dozen books worth) between the Star Empire of Manticore and the Republic of Haven is finally drawing to a conclusion. The Manties have all but won. However, the Empire leadership believes they must further cripple the enemy as they distrust the idea that the other side wants peace as they would not if the situation was reversed.

    Admiral Honor Harrington is almost all alone amidst the top brass in her belief that the Republic wants to end the conflict. She leads a group to the Havenite system to negotiation the terms of peace. However, the peace in our times is devastated when a sneak attack on the Manticoran worlds occur while the Solarian League flexes its muscle at the same time as they distrust the apparent winner of the war especially when they claim the Manties have provoked them with vicious attacks.

    Fans of military science fiction will be euphoric with the return of Harrington who struggles with political and military leaders and bureaucracies as too many of those chicken hawks in charge who never left the office cannot see passed their ambition to the horror of battle (think Cheney vs. Eisenhower). Fast-paced from start to finish, Honor works on a peace agreement when new conflations erupt. Once again David Weber provides a strong winner in one of the top sub-genre series as the aptly titled Mission of Honor takes readers on quite a spin.

    Harriet Klausner

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 4, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    The culmination of the last 5 Honorverse books.

    This book is like a train-wreck. You can see it coming a mile away, but know it is too late to stop. The plot revolves around the titular Honor Harrington FINALLY being dispatched to Haven to bring the Manticore/Havanite war to an end. As the war is wrapping up, the Mesan Alignment's long term plans start to unfold.

    I cannot truly recommend this novel at this time. Only half the story is here, and it feels truly incomplete. Just as with the 2 novels dealing with Honor's internment, this novel would be best read with the yet unpublished follow up novel. It is really part of a duo, not a stand alone novel at all.

    Fans of the series can likely predict every major plot item in the book, from Honor being absurdly good at her job, to minor characters being killed off for emphasis.

    I rate this 3 stars for fans of the series, but only a single star for non-fans.

    6 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 7, 2010

    The Story Continues - Slowly

    If you've been a fan of the series you'll read the book. If not, start at the beginning of the epic. As other reviewers have commented this is half a novel and leads up to what one assumes will be at least a partial finale with respect to the simmering and far too long undiscovered Manpower/Mesan conspiracy - a finale that can't come too soon as far as I'm concerned. This volume was frustrating to me simply because the first 2/3 of the book moved at a glacial pace and violated the first rule of writing: show, don't tell. There were just too many discourses and I found myself torn between putting the book down for a day or so and wanting to throttle it.

    David Weber is one of my favorite writers and the last hundred or so pages demonstrated to me why I like him, but it took such a long time to get there. Perhaps he was tying up loose ends for the next volume but I'd be grateful if he now told himself that part was done and gave us action and visceral satisfaction in the sequel.

    I used to work with a guy who hated to make a decision and when asked for his opinion always replied that he didn't have enough facts to formulate one. No matter how much additional time you gave him the answer was always the same,"I need more facts." Eventually the rest of us just voted and moved on. We have all the facts we need from what Weber's already given us so let's just move on.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2010

    Disappointing

    I've been a fan of David Weber's work for a very long time, but this book missed the mark. Where Weber frequently has major characters that he trades in and out from one book to the next, for some reason he felt the need to include major characters from his "Shadows" series, even though they had little to no bearing on the story. We're forced to follow Abigail Hearns as she leads a Search and Rescue party through the ruins of a ship for no purpose whatsoever, as well as having to read through Helen Zilwicki and Gwen Archer, when none of those story lines had anything to do with the plot itself. It was window dressing that didn't need to be there.

    Further more, Weber takes what used to be my favorite thing about his writing style and turns it around. While he does an outstanding job with his technical descriptions, as well as his character background descriptions, we often find ourselves spending thirty pages getting through five seconds of conversation because Weber takes us on tangent after tangent.

    In addition, the book is rife with spelling and grammatical errors, even simple things that should have been caught with a Spell Check, much less an editorial process.

    In all, however, the book ends with something I've wanted to see since the beginning of "War of Honor," and I stand ready to read the next installment of the series.

    But please, Mr. Weber, leave the "Shadows" characters in the "Shadows" series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 18, 2013

    I like strong female leads in books and David Weber¿s Honor Harr

    I like strong female leads in books and David Weber’s Honor Harrington is one of the strongest. I always look forward to the next novel in this series and have thoroughly enjoyed most of the spin off books as well. The political situation greatly enriches the military one and Weber always provides enough acts of heroic daring and dastardly infamy to keep me happy. My one complaint is that the later novels in the series have run too long and this lessens both the tension and the impact of the great action scenes. I’d like to see Weber try to reduce his word count by about twenty percent and give the reader a tighter story. Not that I won’t anxiously read the sequel however long it is.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2011

    highly recommend

    I have been waiting for this book for a long time . excellent book keeps me wanting for more. david weber is a very good writer as was c s forester.

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  • Posted November 9, 2011

    Highly Recommended

    This book was awesome!! I could not put it down!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2011

    Highly recommended

    Fans of the series will not be disappointed. Some may not like the slower pace of this book, but there are many events transpiring at this point in the story. The resolution of the Manticore Haven war (we hope) the building conflict with the Solarian League, and the emergence of the Mesan Alignment. Mr. Weber also takes us through the polics that drive the military decisions. This is what gives the series so much depth. Without this, all we'd have is a shoot 'em up. As usual I'm left wanting more.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2010

    Not his best in the straight "Honor series".

    I think he jumps around to much for a Honor Harrington book.

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  • Posted July 6, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Weber does it again

    David Wever has done it again. He has written another great Honor Harington nove. In the one he has taken all of the honorverse storys that have come out in the last couple of years and brought them together. He begins to end one story almost as if he were about to end the series but by the end you will know it is anything but the end. It is a book I couldn't put down and look foward to the next installment in fact I almost wish I could read as fast as he writes it. Anyone who likes miltary scifi I would strongly suggest you read any of David Webers Honor Harrington novels and if you just enjoy great story telling try some of his other novels also.

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  • Posted July 4, 2010

    Ends Too Soon

    I just finished reading Mission of Honor. I loved the book. It ended too soon, but then all of his books end too soon since you want them to go on forever. It just keeps building and building and building. Yes, there is a cliff hanger at the end of the book. I really, REALLY wish that the sequel would come before it probably will come out.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted August 8, 2010

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