Mission to Tokyo: The American Airmen Who Took the War to the Heart of Japan

Mission to Tokyo: The American Airmen Who Took the War to the Heart of Japan

4.5 2
by Robert F. Dorr
     
 

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From Hell Hawks! author Bob Dorr, Mission to Tokyo takes the reader on a World War II strategic bombing mission from an airfield on the western Pacific island of Tinian to Tokyo and back. Told in the veterans' words, Mission to Tokyo is a narrative of every aspect of long range bombing, including pilots and other aircrew, groundcrew, and escort

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Overview

From Hell Hawks! author Bob Dorr, Mission to Tokyo takes the reader on a World War II strategic bombing mission from an airfield on the western Pacific island of Tinian to Tokyo and back. Told in the veterans' words, Mission to Tokyo is a narrative of every aspect of long range bombing, including pilots and other aircrew, groundcrew, and escort fighters that accompanied the heavy bombers on their perilous mission.

Several thousand men on the small Mariana Islands of Guam, Saipan, and Tinian were trying to take the war to the Empire—Imperial Japan—in B-29 Superfortresses flying at 28,000 feet, but the high-altitude bombing wasn't very accurate. The decision was made to take the planes down to around 8,000 feet, even as low as 5,000 feet. Eliminating the long climb up would save fuel, and allow the aircraft to take heavier bomb loads. The lower altitude would also increase accuracy substantially. The trade-off was the increased danger of anti-aircraft fire. This was deemed worth the risk, and the devastation brought to the industry and population of the capital city was catastrophic. Unfortunately for all involved, the bombing did not bring on the quick surrender some had hoped for. That would take six more months of bombing, culminating in the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

As with Mission to Berlin (Spring 2011), Mission to Tokyo focuses on a specific mission from spring 1945 and provides a history of the strategic air war against Japan in alternating chapters.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"

Dorr has an exceptional understanding of war from the perspective of the individual airman and is a skilled writer who captures this perspective very well. For the reader who wants an appreciation of what air warfare was like for individuals and crews and is willing to overlook factual misstatements, the book is well worth reading." - Air Power History

"Robert F. Dorr’s Mission to Tokyo captures in rich detail what it waslike logistically and emotionally for the airmen who delivered that deadly ordnance and whose efforts helped hasten the war’s end. Mission to Tokyo is a good story well told." - Smithsonian's Air & Space Magazine

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760341223
Publisher:
Zenith Press
Publication date:
09/15/2012
Edition description:
First
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
565,699
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.40(d)

Meet the Author

Robert F. Dorr is an air force veteran (Korea, 1957 - 1960) and the author of sixty books. He has written thousands of articles for publications like Air and Space Smithsonian, Flight Journal, Air Forces Monthly, Air Power History, Aerospace America, and Air Force Times. Dorr lives with his family in Oakton, Virginia.

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Mission to Tokyo: The American Airmen Who Took the War to the Heart of Japan 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Dr_Spaz More than 1 year ago
ONlY downside to this was I had to go to I-Books on ITunes to re-purchase the e-book as B&N was unable to fix the content and it kept giving me an error code This book turned out to be cheaper on ITunes than B&N
moxted More than 1 year ago
this was a well written book and Mr. Dorr has done the the subject justice. Unfortunately, the publisher needs to hire a proofreader or perhaps fire the one they have. when there are many typos it makes me question what else may not be right