Mississippi Bridge

( 5 )

Overview

Jeremy Simms watches from the porch of the general store as the passengers board the weekly bus from Jackson. When several white passengers arrive late, the driver roughly orders the black passengers off to make room. Then, in the driving rain, disaster strikes, and Jeremy witnesses a shocking end to the day's drama. Set in Mississippi in the 1930s, this is a gripping story of racial injustice.

"Taylor, a powerful storyteller, again combines authentic incidents to create a taut ...

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Overview

Jeremy Simms watches from the porch of the general store as the passengers board the weekly bus from Jackson. When several white passengers arrive late, the driver roughly orders the black passengers off to make room. Then, in the driving rain, disaster strikes, and Jeremy witnesses a shocking end to the day's drama. Set in Mississippi in the 1930s, this is a gripping story of racial injustice.

"Taylor, a powerful storyteller, again combines authentic incidents to create a taut plot...Her cry for justice always rings true." —Kirkus Reviews

During a heavy rainstorm in 1930s rural Mississippi, a ten-year-old white boy sees a bus driver order all the black passengers off a crowded bus to make room for late-arriving white passengers and then set off across the raging Rosa Lee River.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The Newbery Medalist reprises the Logan family in telling a powerful story about the segregated South of the 1930s. Ages 7-11. July
School Library Journal
Gr 5-10-- Drawing once again upon her father's stories, Taylor has created a harsh, disturbing tale of racism in Mississippi during the 1930s. Told from the viewpoint of Jeremy Simms, a ten-year-old white boy who aspires to be friends with the black children of the Logan family, this is the story of a rainy day, an overloaded bus, and the destiny of its passengers after the driver has ordered the black travelers off to make room for latecoming whites. Telescoping the injustices faced by blacks on a daily basis into one afternoon drives home the omnipresent effects of racism with a relentless force. This is an angry book, replete with examples of the insults and injuries to which the African-American characters are subjected. Jeremy, the only white character to acknowledge this unfairness, is brought to task by his father for ``snivelin' '' after the Logans. The book's climax is a catastrophic accident in which the bus crashes off a bridge, killing the passengers. When Jeremy asks a black rescuer how such a thing could happen, he is told, ``the Lord works in mysterious ways.'' This is a disturbing explanation, not for its implication that the white passengers are being punished for the sins of their race so much as for the logical extension that the black characters were saved because they were kept off the bus in the first place. Well written and thought provoking, this book will haunt readers and generate much discussion. --Anna DeWind, Milwaukee Public Library
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780606005289
  • Publisher: San Val, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/1/1992
  • Series: Logan Family Series
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Pages: 62
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Mildred D. Taylor is the author of nine novels including The Road to Memphis, Let the Circle Be Unbroken, The Land, and Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry. Her books have won numerous awards, among them a Newbery Medal (for Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry), four Coretta Scott King Awards, and a Boston Globe—Horn Book Award. Her book The Land was awarded the L.A. Times Book Prize and the PEN Award for Children’s Literature. In 2003, Ms. Taylor was named the First Laureate of the NSK Neustadt Prize for Children’s Literature.
                Mildred Taylor was born in Jackson, Mississippi, and grew up in Toledo, Ohio. After graduating from the University of Toledo, she served in the Peace Corps in Ethiopia for two years and then spent the next year traveling throughout the United States, working and recruiting for the Peace Corps. At the University of Colorado’s School of Journalism, she helped created a Black Studies program and taught in the program for two years. Ms. Taylor has worked as a proofreader-editor and as program coordinator for an international house and a community free school. She now devotes her time to her family, writing, and what she terms “the family ranch” in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. 

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2006

    Blacks Not Equal

    Jeremy Simms is a boy who treats black people right. He doesn't treat them badly like others do. In those days black people are not treated right. Miz Hattie was white and she got to try on a hat when the black girl didn't. Josias and the other black people got thrown off the bus because there wasn't any room for the white people . The bus was going to cross the bridge but it was covered in fog and you could barely see. We thought the bookwas sad but good . It was good becuse it talks about history and how they treated black people .The language was hard to read .

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2003

    every one will love this book!!!!

    If you like books that have happened in earlier in life you will probably like this Book. You should probably read this whole book at one time, so you don¿t forget any parts. Mississippi Bridge (the book) is about four black kids and one white kid who is trying to be friends with the black kids. There is one bus ride that changes every ones life in the story. If you like the type of story that could be real but it¿s not real you will really like this story. If I could give this story more then 5 stars I would give it 500 stars because it is such a surprising and wonderful book. And I guarantee you will like this book. Now if you want to find out what happens in the story you should probably read the book. If you read this book I hope you like it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2003

    outstanding book

    Mississippi Bridge is as sad as it is great. One of the best books I ever read. If I could give this book 1,000 stars I would. This book is historical and suspenseful at the same time. If I could write a second Mississippi Bridge I would. If you like black history this is the book for you. Here¿s the outline of the story. The Login family¿s grandma goes off on a trip. So they start to go back to family friends house when something terrible will happen. Read it to find out what happens.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

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