Mitten : An Old Ukrainian Folktale

Mitten : An Old Ukrainian Folktale

4.7 4
by Alvin Tresselt, Yaroslova, Yaroslava Mills

Deep in the woods on the coldest day of winter a little boy drops his mitten. And that lost mitten stretches and stretches — and stretches — to provide shelter for many woodland creatures. A Ukrainian folk tale.  See more details below


Deep in the woods on the coldest day of winter a little boy drops his mitten. And that lost mitten stretches and stretches — and stretches — to provide shelter for many woodland creatures. A Ukrainian folk tale.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble Staff
A little boy, gathering kindling in the snow doesn't notice when his furry mitten falls off. A mouse finds the mitten and decides to make it a cozy home. Just as the mouse gets comfortable, other forest dwellers, including a big brown bear, ask to squeeze in. Alas, when a little cricket wants in too, the mitten finally bursts, and the animals tumble out onto the snow. The animals' clothing reflects the Ukrainian origin of the story.

Product Details

HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
Edition description:
Sales rank:
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 9.87(h) x 0.00(d)
AD840L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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Mitten : An Old Ukrainian Folktale 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Gardenseed More than 1 year ago
This is a good book for reading aloud to young children, as I used to do when I was a children's librarian in New York City.  There is plenty of suspense: what will happen as more and more animals crowd into the little mitten?  The brightly colorful pictures are easily seen from a distance and are well suited for displays. You can read this in any season or to celebrate a snowy day!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Mitten is a colorful, entrancing, and amusing tale of a lost mitten and the delightful adventures it goes through. Narrated by a young child relating the tale of his grandfather¿s lost mitten, The Mitten begins and ends on a rather mysterious note. The simple but appealing illustrations and jacket design display a color preference that draws the eye towards the central object on each page, and the straightforward plot includes simple vocabulary, causing the book to be appropriate for young readers. The book starts out with a child collecting firewood for his grandmother who happens to be knitting him a new pair of mittens. As he heads home, one of his mittens slips unnoticed off his tiny hand into a snowdrift. Animals begin to nestle in the lining of the worn mitten for warmth. The animals increase in size and proportion until a mighty bear decides to squeeze into the already filled mitten. With great difficulty, he wedges himself in and at that moment, an old cricket comes along. She places no more than one foot in the mitten when it explodes. When the young boy comes back to collect his mitten, he is confused at why it consists of several ragged pieces. Shrugging, he picks up the pieces and heads home to where a newly knitted pair of mittens awaits him. Suitable for grades K-3, The Mitten fits the various age levels in a few different ways. Kindergarteners and first graders will giggle at the idea of so many animals fitting into such a small place. The mental picture of the explosion of the mitten might also be thrilling to this age level; children typically love loud bangs and detonations. Older and more mature readers will start to digest the message of the book - friendship and generosity. Although the message subconsciously sinks in for infantile booklovers, older readers may start to relate the message to themselves and the world around them. The second and third graders may actually learn more from this book, for they not only understand the moral but also can practice their reading skills by reading it aloud to a parent or older child.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is amazing and fun, and great for children of all ages. Years ago (more than I'd like to recall) when I was in kindergarten, we read this story and the teacher had the students engage in an activity afterward in which we all brought in our own mitten to leave outside and see if any forest creatures should happen by. I couldn't get enough of this book as a child, nor today.