Mixing Races: From Scientific Racism to Modern Evolutionary Ideas

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$17.16
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $5.83
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 70%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (14) from $5.83   
  • New (6) from $7.10   
  • Used (8) from $5.83   

Overview

This book explores changing American views of race mixing in the twentieth century, showing how new scientific ideas transformed accepted notions of race and how those ideas played out on college campuses in the 1960s.

In the 1930s it was not unusual for medical experts to caution against miscegenation, or race mixing, espousing the common opinion that it would produce biologically dysfunctional offspring. By the 1960s the scientific community roundly refuted this theory. Paul Lawrence Farber traces this revolutionary shift in scientific thought, explaining how developments in modern population biology, genetics, and anthropology proved that opposition to race mixing was a social prejudice with no justification in scientific knowledge.

In the 1960s, this new knowledge helped to change attitudes toward race and discrimination, especially among college students. Their embrace of social integration caused tension on campuses across the country. Students rebelled against administrative interference in their private lives, and university regulations against interracial dating became a flashpoint in the campus revolts that revolutionized American educational institutions.

Farber’s provocative study is a personal one, featuring interviews with mixed-race couples and stories from the author’s student years at the University of Pittsburgh. As such, Mixing Races offers a unique perspective on how contentious debates taking place on college campuses reflected radical shifts in race relations in the larger society.

Johns Hopkins University Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Midwest Book Review
Mixing Races is a fascinating look at how evolutionary science has changed alongside social beliefs.
New Scientist
The history of natural history can rarely have been as succinctly told as in Paul Lawrence Farber's 129-page Finding Order in Nature... It is an odyssey beautifully told.
Choice

Books like this one will open the dialogue about social barriers and group identities. A must read for undergraduates, students, faculty and administration, and parents. Essential.

PsycCRITIQUES
It provides a succint, well-organized review of 20th-century scientific research and thinking relevant to notions of race that may assist in our understanding of many of the racial issues that we continue to face as a nation.

— Vetta L. Sanders Thompson

PsycCRITIQUES - Vetta L. Sanders Thompson
It provides a succint, well-organized review of 20th-century scientific research and thinking relevant to notions of race that may assist in our understanding of many of the racial issues that we continue to face as a nation.
Journal of the History of Biology - Garland E. Allen
Farber’s short book (110 pages of actual text) traces both historically and sociologically the changing attitudes on race-mixing (miscegenation) in western culture, though the focus is on the United States... Mixing Races is a clear, well written and useful book. Particularly unique are the personal experiences that the author brings to the story... The documentation is inclusive without being overpowering, and the extra readings at the end of each chapter provide ample opportunities for further exploration.
Choice
Books like this one will open the dialogue about social barriers and group identities. A must read for undergraduates, students, faculty and administration, and parents. Essential.
Library Journal
Farber studies the concept of race-mixing, going back to campus life in the 1960s and interviewing mixed-race couples. He assesses the shift in attitudes toward race relations in the 20th century.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Paul Lawrence Farber is OSU Distinguished Professor of History of Science, Emeritus, at Oregon State University and author of Discovering Birds: The Emergence of Ornithology as a Scientific Discipline, 1760–1850 and Finding Order in Nature: The Naturalist Tradition from Linnaeus to E. O. Wilson, both also published by Johns Hopkins.

Johns Hopkins University Press

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)