MMR and Autism: What Parents Need to Know [NOOK Book]

Overview

"Speculation that MMR - the combined vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella - may be a cause of autism in children has provoked fierce controversy and widespread anxiety." "Though medical opinion is overwhelmingly in favour of MMR, the campaign against the vaccine has made many parents worried and confused. Both professionals and parents struggle to cope with the resulting anxieties and fears and find it difficult to get a balanced account of the issues." In MMR and Autism Michael Fitzpatrick, a general practitioner who is also the parent of
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MMR and Autism: What Parents Need to Know

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Overview

"Speculation that MMR - the combined vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella - may be a cause of autism in children has provoked fierce controversy and widespread anxiety." "Though medical opinion is overwhelmingly in favour of MMR, the campaign against the vaccine has made many parents worried and confused. Both professionals and parents struggle to cope with the resulting anxieties and fears and find it difficult to get a balanced account of the issues." In MMR and Autism Michael Fitzpatrick, a general practitioner who is also the parent of an autistic child, explains why he believes the anti-MMR campaign is misguided in a way that will reassure parents considering vaccination and also relieve the continued anxieties of parents of autistic children. At the same time the book provides healthcare professionals and health studies students with an accessible overview of a contemporary health and media issue with significant policy implications.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'Michael Fitzpatrick splendidly demolishes the argument that MMR causes autism by careful review of the scientific and other evidence. He also provides an insightful review of autism and its management, together with the role of risk aversion in health scares like the MMR. Every health worker, parent, politician and journalist concerned with these issues must read this brilliant book.' - Brent Taylor, Professor of Community Child Health, Royal Free and University College Medical School

'Fitzpatrick ... offers a profound and wide-ranging account including politics, philosophy and rationality, science and medicine, the media, the medics, history and autism itself from both sides of the fence and indeed the fence itself. Erudite without obscurity, economical without dryness, I found his book a gripping read - and so did my wife, a non medic.' - Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine

'This book is a tour de force. Extensively researched and impeccably argued.' - Health Watch

'Dr Fitzpatrick's book on the MMR affair goes well beyond the affair itself, and casts a searchlight on our society, indeed on our soul.' - Dr Anthony Daniels, Sunday Telegraph

'Michael Fitzpatrick is a general practitioner and also the parent of a child with autism. Fortunately he is also a very good writer and has produced a readable, well-discussed book about the MMR-autism saga. The book is informative, detailed, and accurate.' - International Journal of Epidemiology

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781134355914
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 8/2/2004
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 232
  • File size: 513 KB

Meet the Author

Michael Fitzpatrick is a general practitioner working in Hackney, London.

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Table of Contents

I Introduction : what parents need to know 1
1 How the risk society turned on its own children 10
2 The MMR debacle 10
3 The trouble with vaccines 18
4 Age of anxiety 39
II How parents turned against MMR 58
5 Autism and parents 58
6 Alternative autism 78
7 The campaign against MMR 101
III The problem of junk science 118
8 The Lancet paper 118
9 Missing links 138
10 The metamorphosis of Andrew Wakefield 157
11 Epilogue : what doctors need to do 177
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2004

    Brilliant study of the 'MMR and autism' scare

    This superb book gives an extremely useful account of the current state of knowledge of autism and its causes. It also shows that parents should allow their children to be immunised with MMR. The author is a London GP, who has an autistic son James. Dr Fitzpatrick reminds us of the dangers of measles, mumps and rubella. In the ten years before the first measles immunisation was introduced in Britain, 850 children died from measles. Since MMR immunisation was introduced in 1988, there have been only four deaths from measles, and 19 from complications. Japan, with a low uptake of MMR immunisation, has 50/100 measles deaths a year. So the government is right to encourage mass MMR immunisation and to oppose the individual choice of separate vaccines, even though its promotion of `individual choice¿ and `personalised care¿ undermines all good NHS policies. The government¿s `faith-based¿ politics - evident in Blair¿s refusal to say whether his son Leo had been immunised - align it against both the medical profession and scientific evidence. The original article that sparked the MMR immunisation scare, by Dr Andrew Wakefield, only raised the possibility of a relationship between MMR immunisation and autism: it put forward no evidence of a causal link, and specified no mechanism of transmission. In the subsequent five years, he has failed to substantiate his claim. Since then, many independent researchers have proven that there is no causal link between MMR and autism, but Dr Wakefield refuses to accept the overwhelming evidence. He even told a US senate committee that the Royal Statistical Society had damned an important study that refuted his hypothesis, although this was not true. He has now moved to a private clinic in Florida run by an evangelical Christian. We still know too little about the neurobiological framework of autism. The one thing we do know is that whatever else causes autism, it is not MMR immunisation. The facts show that MMR vaccine is safe, and that immunisation does not compromise natural immunity.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted May 14, 2009

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