Mobile Tech Report 2014 [NOOK Book]

Overview

If you read technology news, you’ll notice it’s not just a story of amazing new product introductions, or even that plus copycat product introductions. All the usual aspects of business are there: fierce competition, new contenders, old survivors, great ideas but business failures, mediocre ideas that somehow seem to succeed and prosper.

As a reporter, commentator and ...
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Mobile Tech Report 2014

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Overview

If you read technology news, you’ll notice it’s not just a story of amazing new product introductions, or even that plus copycat product introductions. All the usual aspects of business are there: fierce competition, new contenders, old survivors, great ideas but business failures, mediocre ideas that somehow seem to succeed and prosper.

As a reporter, commentator and blogger on mobile technology, I’ve collected what happened in the industry in 2013 and make predictions on what will and won’t happen in 2014.

You can read what did happen in the mobile technology in 2013. Often I deliver a comment with the news item and usually there is a link to the web page of the original announcement. This way you can dive into any detail level you desire, read my news feed for the overview or follow the related web link to the longer article.

History is moving so fast now that it is all recorded electronically, but I’m surprised no one else has collected it and presented it for consideration. Here is 2013 from the mobile technology industry for your consideration along with my own observations and opinions about where things are headed.

It’s often overlooked that the technology industry is an industry. By that I mean its main concerns are profit and growth. As consumers we love the new products and unique abilities we are gaining from technology, but it is a business akin to any other, trying to seduce us to pry money out of our wallets. So I cover the horse race aspect of the business, who’s up, who’s down. Is that changing? Is that likely to change?

The longer implications of what the technology industry is doing are vast and social. We are moving to an always on, always connected society where we can communicate with someone instantly and find an answer to any question quickly. The entire database of human knowledge is now available in the palm of your hand whenever you desire it. Everything is there, the good, the bad, right and wrong, hate and love, music and noise. We are obsessed with technology, not in and of itself, but as a means to an end. Technology is the means to satisfy our curiosity or even our desire for self-expression. We are taking photos machine gun-style with our smartphones and choose the few to share. As humans we are gathering ever more data about ourselves and sharing more about ourselves than we probably thought possible.

Bill Gates was once asked why the computer industry had generated so much improvement in its products over a relatively few years. He gave some boring answer about Moore’s Law, but the real answer is that computers are in their teenage years. They are growing and growing. They will not always do so. So too the technology industry is in a state of rapid change. I see the shift to smaller devices as a new paradigm, smashing some businesses and growing others into giants. Their stories are here in the news.

In short here are predictions for what won’t and will happen in 2014 for the mobile technology industry, breakdowns of marketshare figures on the horse race aspect of the business, chapters on Apple, Samsung, Google, Microsoft, Nokia, Blackberry, Amazon, Yahoo, news about social media giants Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, Foursquare, SnapChat and the carriers themselves Verizon, AT&T, Sprint andT-Mobile. You can also review my 2013 mobile predictions and see my track record on predictions.

Finally there are some essays on how all this mobile tech is figuring into our lives.

I’ve divided the news into the subjects it covers, but also put in the appendix all the news as it came out in chronological ordering. You can read the firehose of events in the appendix, or just read about one topic at a time in the earlier chapters.


Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction
Chapter 1: 2014 Predictions
Chapter 2: Mobile Marketshare
Chapter 3: Apple
Chapter 4: Samsung
Chapter 5: Google
Chapter 6: Microsoft
Chapter 7: Nokia
Chapter 8: Blackberry
Chapter 9: Amazon
Chapter 10: Social Media
Chapter 11: Yahoo
Chapter 12: Carriers
Chapter 13: 2013 Predictions
Chapter 14: Essays
Appendix
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940148350088
  • Publisher: Mindwarm Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/10/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 1,022 KB

Meet the Author

Mobile technology is huge in our lives today. You’re probably carrying a smartphone, going to work with a desktop or laptop during the day and web surfing on your couch with a tablet. We’ve moved into a constantly connected, always on, continuously communicating lifestyle. This would not be possible without technology and the tech industry has been going through a big upheaval with the migration to ever more mobile devices.

It all started in 2007 with the introduction of the Apple iPhone, but like most tech products, it was really an evolution based on all that came before it. I can say this because I’ve worked in the technology industry for 30 years and have watched the incredible rise of microelectronic devices in our lives.

In June 2010 I began reporting the tech news I read into my @pdxmobile Twitter account, so named because I live in Portland, Oregon (PDX is the local airport designation) and mobile is where all the technology action is nowadays. I worked in the tech industry because I was an enthusiast for the products. As an engineer I helped design some or helped on equipment used to build others. I feel this gives me insight into how things get put together before they’re made available to the public.

I gather most of my news online now, or at in-person meetings that the tech community love such as Lunch 2.0, CHIFOO (Computer Human Interface Forum of Oregon), Barcamp, Ignite Portland, PDX Breakfast, WebVisions, Dorkbot, Open Source Bridge, Android User Group, PDX Cocoaheads, InnoTech, Drupalcon, Chirp, Beer and Blog, PADNUG and other meetups. It’s a big wild tech world out there and I enjoy being part of it as an engineer, a consumer of tech goodies, a visionary on my blog at pdxmobile.com and just a watcher of all things technological.
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