Moby Dick (Annotated)

Moby Dick (Annotated)

4.2 128
by Herman Melville

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This edition is annotated, with additional information about Moby Dick. It has also been formatted for your NOOK.

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is a novel by Herman Melville, first published in 1851. It is considered to be one of the Great American Novels. The story tells the adventures of wandering sailor Ishmael and his voyage on the whaleship Pequod,…  See more details below


This edition is annotated, with additional information about Moby Dick. It has also been formatted for your NOOK.

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is a novel by Herman Melville, first published in 1851. It is considered to be one of the Great American Novels. The story tells the adventures of wandering sailor Ishmael and his voyage on the whaleship Pequod, commanded by Captain Ahab. Ishmael soon learns that Ahab has one purpose on this voyage: to seek out Moby Dick, a ferocious, enigmatic white sperm whale. In a previous encounter, the whale destroyed Ahab's boat and bit off his leg, which now drives Ahab to take revenge.

In Moby-Dick, Melville employs stylized language, symbolism, and metaphor to explore numerous complex themes. Through the journey of the main characters, the concepts of class and social status, good and evil, and the existence of God are all examined, as the main characters speculate upon their personal beliefs and their places in the universe. The narrator's reflections, along with his descriptions of a sailor's life aboard a whaling ship, are woven into the narrative along with Shakespearean literary devices, such as stage directions, extended soliloquies, and asides. The book portrays destructive obsession and monomania, as well as the assumption of anthropomorphism.

Moby-Dick has been classified as American Romanticism. It was first published by Richard Bentley in London on October 18, 1851, in an expurgated three-volume edition titled The Whale, and weeks later as a single volume, by New York City publisher Harper and Brothers as Moby-Dick; or, The Whale on November 14, 1851. The book initially received mixed reviews, but is now considered part of the Western canon, and at the center of the canon of American novels.

Moby-Dick begins with the line "Call me Ishmael." According to the American Book Review's rating in 2011, this is one of the most recognizable opening lines in Western literature.

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Bronson Tweed Publishing
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Moby Dick 4.2 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 128 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After reading the previous reader reveiws, I'll be brief and to the point. This book should not be read by eighth graders or other persons who are not at the top of their game with regard to their ability to read dificult text. I am over 50 years old and chose to read it for myself, although I found it very intimidating to start. The importance of the detail is when one considers Moby as God or nature the details are an attempt to understand the whale aka God and it can't be done. Now do you get it? Nobody can understand God and consequently nobody can understand the symbol of God as portrayed in this miraculous novel. I will indeed miss reading it.
Jesop More than 1 year ago
The greatest novel in American literature, Moby Dick is as massive and inscrutable as the White Whale of the title. This is a book with the primal logic of a dream and the timelessness of myth. The characters themselves have become legend; the restless sailor Ishmael, the noble savage Queegueg, stalwart first mate Starbuck, and Captain Ahab, a man of fearful determination and charisma. Ahab stands as one of the great tragic heroes and he is characterized with the emotional grandeur and raw force of Hamlet or Lucifer. I will note that no one says or does anything that remotely resembles what a normal person would do or say. The dialogue and narrative is instead presented in complex, stately, refined, and operatic terms. It is clear that Melville intended this to be an epic. The characters are appropriately larger than life. I will say that this book is not for everyone, and many complain that it is boring and ponderous. Be forewarned that Herman Melville spends half the chapters describing the minutiae of life on a 19th century whaling ship. Yet even these plot-less chapters on such topics as rendering blubber to oil contain philosophical depth and striking grace. Have patience and you will be rewarded. It seems Melville sought to encompass everything in his novel; all of humanity can be found on board the Pequod. We drift through our days and nights on the immense unknowable sea of life, driven forth by those in power, hunting elusive goals for reasons we cannot define, all of us doomed men. It should be noted that this review covers the Modern Library hardcover edition of this book. I cannot praise it enough. It is simply and handsomely presented, sturdy, and contains all of Rockwell Kent's striking and detailed 1930 line drawn illustrations. This book is a fine edition to any personal library.
Guest More than 1 year ago
We have all heard the story of the infamous encounter between Captain Ahab and his nemesis Moby-Dick. I understood it to be a classic and began to read it even though I already saw the movie. The first few chapters had that ominous feeling (Melvilles' brilliant foreshadowing) and purported to promise better things to come. Well, they didn't. Instead Melville drolls on frivolous topics for countless chapters; he literally fills 3/4 of the book with chapters the reader can skip over and still not lose any of the story plot. It took me months to get through his book and it was not until the last three chapters that I realized why this book was a classic. The ending had such a profound impact on me that I have decided to reread Moby-Dick...though not for a long while.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is perhaps one of the best I have ever read. If for sheer style alone this book is awe inspiring. The narative talent of Melville is like that of Hugo, supurfluous yet strikingly beautiful. An emotionally compelling read there is so much depth to be found within these pages and so much to learn of human nature, and put so eloquently. Melville truely does have a silver pen!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I can't put it down!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Seems silly to comment on a classic, but it's nostalgic to re-read something like this and see how great writing remains great.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
this book is full of detail and i love how it was written my favorite charecter in this book is captain ahab once you read the book from start to finish you will see why i love and cherish this book that is a great work of art
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I haven't actually ready this particular copy, edition or what have you. It was one I grabbed for the cover for my e-library. I read Moby Dick awhile back in hard cover form from the local library. I never read it in school and always prided myself for getting out of reading book assignments.(so many regrets) Moby Dick is a great book. It is a bit long, and I always joke you could take 200 pages out and still have a good story. It is a famous classic that will live on forever. There are some great quotes in the book. Two of my favorate have even made it into Star Trek shows and movies. Gene Roddenberry was a fan of the book and references to Moby Dick are found thoughout the Star Trek universe. If you've never read it, read it. If you haven't got time or patients read an abridged version. Melville can be a bit wordy but then with out words books would be just blank paper. The characters are good and there has been much discussion about some of the scenes and what if any thing Mevlille was implying.
Anonymous 17 hours ago
Pads in and leaves a bundle made out of leaves. The bundle moves around and mews pitifully. The cat moves on, never to be seen again.
Anonymous 18 hours ago
Anonymous 5 days ago
March on up to my chemical romance and thank MCR for all that they have done stay srong my killjoys
Anonymous 6 days ago
[ I haz returned! ] <p> The older tom slipped in, his once bright eyes flickering around.
Anonymous 6 days ago
She watches,twitching her wings,then pads out. "Um. May i jion? I cant fly,but i can still be at good use. Im 7 moons old."
Anonymous 12 days ago
Hello i am a new kit but i dont know my name please help
Anonymous 14 days ago
The white shecat pads in, looking over the cats. "Hello?" She mewls.
Anonymous 16 days ago
Flies down to a tree and sits on it
Anonymous 18 days ago
I replye to you at the gathering place... (empty storm) -pads out
Anonymous 3 months ago
The stunning bright ginger she-cat padded in. She flexed her large wings that were tipped in gold and white. "Hello, little one," she mewed softly, gazing into the eyes of Twilightkit. "I'm Firebird." <p> A dark pelted tom followed the she-cat. He sat behind her and looked at Twilightkit. "Hey ... I'm Raveheart."
Anonymous 5 months ago
Slowly walks into the territory hoping to be accepted
Anonymous 6 months ago
The cream tabby pads in and looks around cautiously with bright green eyes. "May I join?"
Anonymous 6 months ago
So this is where this place went.
Anonymous 7 months ago
I have come back you guys probably don't remember me,see my nook broke in about February it is good to be back looks like activity in rp is high well its good to be back)Lightshadow : wondered what has changed since his absence in the Clan. Bravepaw :she padded in next to Lightshadow looking at the new camp
Anonymous 8 months ago
Hey guys....its been a while huh?
Anonymous 9 months ago
Lands on the ground